Anybody have a Moto Guzzi V7?

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by MotorCade, Oct 20, 2012.

  1. pilot

    pilot Slacker Moderator Super Moderator

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  2. Threewheelbonnie

    Threewheelbonnie Long timer

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    That one in the brochure looks like a V7 stylee small block with the same tank the Nevada has had for years and new bits like the rear mud guard.

    Typical Guzzi IMHO; if it's in production next year it'll be a true model, if not it's another bitsa.

    I would look at a V7 in the same room. If the wearing mechanicals are the same go for it.

    The 48 vs 50 hHP could be down to either exhaust shape or air box area changes to get the seat height down. That or someone different at Guzzi wrote the PR.

    Andy
  3. pyoungbl

    pyoungbl Colonel Blood

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    Hey Pilot, did you get your forks upgraded? If so, what's the verdict? Exactly what was done?

    I put 100 miles on mine yesterday and think that I have finally gotten the suspension dialed in for my weight and riding.

    Peter Y.
  4. AZ Air Hd

    AZ Air Hd Rider - NOT biker

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    NEVADA; to "cruiserik" for my taste. As the name implies 'nevada', probably a fraud!
    Howbout' a V7 - SCRAMBLER? Would that be cool, or what? !
    If Trumph & Duckie can do it & sell 'em, why not Piaggio Grupo?
  5. Threewheelbonnie

    Threewheelbonnie Long timer

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    They have forks, tanks and seats left over or at least simple to order for a Nevada. It is a cruiser. When I rode my dads I had the exact reaction I did with a Harley Sportster: Great engine, now dump the Village People get up and make it ride like a Bonneville. I got my wish.

    A Scrambler is harder. There are no nice knobblies that fit the 18 inch front wheel (I know I've looked) so they need a wheel and hence a brake type approved. The exhaust would be a design, test and homologation job too.

    Andy
  6. AZ Air Hd

    AZ Air Hd Rider - NOT biker

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    Andy, good reply & perspective. Thnx!
    Guess I'm missing my CL450 from the '70s.
    Ric. in Arizona
  7. pilot

    pilot Slacker Moderator Super Moderator

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    I think so. Hard to tell for sure since the shocks are still harsh. We reset the emulator to one turn out with blue springs and drilled one additional hole in the valve piece. There were two holes, now there are three. I may eventually drill the fourth.

    I left my stock shocks with the suspension guy to play with. He's going to see if there is anything he can do with them. After his preliminary examination, he thinks they may be rebuild-able. If they are he may be able to revalve them.
  8. pyoungbl

    pyoungbl Colonel Blood

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    Pilot, I drilled two holes in the metering rod and two in the emulator. The goal is to get the metering rod totally out of the equation so that all metering is being done by the emulator.

    Peter Y.
  9. Pokeyjoe

    Pokeyjoe Aprilia Dorsoduro

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    That's what I did on mine, too. If you don't, you'll be over damped.
  10. pilot

    pilot Slacker Moderator Super Moderator

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    He did that when he installed the emulators. The holes I'm talking about are in the little brass piece that is under the spring in the emulator. Two holes are drilled, two are started. He drilled out one of the started holes. That acts as a bypass for the little bumps and makes the ride a little nicer. I may still drill the second started hole.

    I'll wait until he can revalve the stock shocks, if possible. He's been working on shocks and forks for a long time. He says the shock is a gas filled shock, so he has to drill a hole in the shock to let out the gas so he can take it apart. If it works, he will install a shrader (sp) valve to refill after the valve is changed.

    If all this works out, I will part with the Hagons I have on the bike now. It would be pretty cool if the stock shocks can be resprung and revalved.
  11. pyoungbl

    pyoungbl Colonel Blood

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    For those who are not sure about the emulator part Pilot and I have drilled out, here's the part:
    [​IMG]
    It comes with two holes drilled, I drilled two more holes where you can see dimples already in place.
  12. pilot

    pilot Slacker Moderator Super Moderator

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    Yep, that's the piece. :thumb If my suspension guy gets good results with my shocks, I want him to post in Vendors. I'm pretty sure he could get a ton of shock work just with V7s.
  13. pyoungbl

    pyoungbl Colonel Blood

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    I understand that much of the guts of emulsion shocks is very similar between the cheapo to super expensive. In other words, it should be possible to take the OEM shock apart and reassemble with higher quality shim stack....maybe better seals too...and not break the bank. You would still be stuck with non adjustable shocks but they would dampen much better.

    Peter Y.
  14. DolphinJohn

    DolphinJohn Caveman

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    Well. I have one!! Drove 3 1/2 hours each way to pick it up.

    Gave it a look and a little loop in the parking lot, loaded it up in my truck and drove 3 1/2 hours home.

    It's late but I couldn't resist at least going around the block.

    The damned right front turn signal is not working. Swapped bulbs with the other side and it's not the bulb. Thought maybe the wires were reversed, but that's not it either. Don't know what to check next. Not driving another 7 hours.

    Maybe the cheap light itself is bad. I'll swap the lights in the morning and try to narrow it down.

    I really don't want to have to take off the tank and chase wires on a brand new bike.

    I blame myself for not being more thorough before I left. I was excited and wanted to get it home.

    Happy and disappointed.

    .
  15. DolphinJohn

    DolphinJohn Caveman

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  16. Penderic

    Penderic Format C:/u

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    More likely caused by a loose connector - check the bundle of wires just behind the headlight shell - one of the smaller connectors.
  17. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin?

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    Point of clarification - with incandescent bulbs the filament doesn't care which way the electricity flows. Reversing the connectors shouldn't make a difference. You have a loose connection somewhere that should be easy to find.

    Look at it this way - you got the whole Italian experience, and now you've paid your dues to the Italian electrical gods :D
  18. pilot

    pilot Slacker Moderator Super Moderator

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    I guess no one told you that when you buy a Guzzi, you become you own service department. The good news is it is really easy to work on. There is a ton of information out there and lots of helpful owners willing to help.

    Don't be disappointed, I had an issue with a fuel line connector when I got mine. Curvy tried to burn it up, or so the story goes. Once I figured out how to operate the connectors, all was fine.

    You would miss the whole Guzzi experience if the bike was perfect out of the box. :lol3

    One more thing. When checking the oil, crank on that oil stick or it will back itself out while riding, spewing oil all over the left side of the bike. And your boot. Just a little snug up with pliers to get it tight.
  19. Super Sneaky Steve

    Super Sneaky Steve B@nned Club :D

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    That black stone sure does look good.
  20. DolphinJohn

    DolphinJohn Caveman

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    Got the turn signal working. As a bonus, I now know how to remove the tank! (ok, only lifted it up a bit).

    A wire pulled out of the connector. Pretty tight, not a lot of slack in that wire. I tried to slacken it the best I could.

    Another question. The manual says there's a cold start lever but I don't see anything on the bike.

    Is there a "choke" for these?

    .