Are the NGK CR8EIX any better?

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by Balsta, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. Balsta

    Balsta Been here awhile

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    #1
  2. PABiker

    PABiker Anywhere but here

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    I'll let you know, I have 3 sitting on the bench right now. 2 for the 950 and one for the DRZ. Just haven't got off my ass to put them in yet.
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  3. MookieBlaylock

    MookieBlaylock Long timer

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    i noticed that the bike runs really smooth for 2 or 3 hundred miles after new plugs. I thought it was the iridiums at first. Too bad the front plug isnt as ez to change as the rear
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  4. Stobie

    Stobie Mr. Motivated

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    I put one in my 640 Adv, and it noticeably started better, idled smoother, and accepted throttle better at low rpm. Above 2000-2500 rpm I couldn't tell a difference.

    I put them in my 950SE and didn't notice a difference. I'll use them again anyway, because they really should be a better plug, and when you're changing them every 10k miles, the cost difference is negligible.
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  5. firebolter

    firebolter Been here awhile

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    I run that plug in my Husky SM610. Works good, no major noticeable difference I can tell.
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  6. Zander

    Zander Been here awhile

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    I currently run NGK CR8EK on my 950.

    I'm currently performing winter maintenance and was wondering if it is worth it to go to Iridium NGK CR8EIX ?
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  7. David P.

    David P. Been here awhile

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    Bilke will run a lot smoother and it will start a lot easier so very noticeable difference!
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  8. AdvGa

    AdvGa Long timer

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    ...in addition, they have a Better Designed Core and last about 3X the normal plug.

    ...and you don't Gap them (they are pre-gapped in the Box)
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  9. Zander

    Zander Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the feedback. I'll get some iridium plugs tomorrow. :thumb
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  10. Tangai

    Tangai Been here awhile

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    I use them in mine, but I can't tell any difference at all. They are supposed to last a lot longer.
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  11. AdvGa

    AdvGa Long timer

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    Post back at about 30k miles and let us know how they worked out...



    Here are some more benefits:

    Why NGK Iridium?

    More Durability and a Higher Melting Point compared to Platinum,

    better center electrode anti-oxidation and anti-erosion,

    improved ignition,
    superior anti-fouling,
    lower required voltage,
    new metal shell plating process for better anti-corrosion.
    http://www.shopwiki.com/ngk-iridium-spark-plugs

    http://bikeadvice.in/ngk-ir-iridium-spark-plugs-motorcycles/


    [​IMG]
    A spark plug firing end temperature must be kept low enough to prevent pre-ignition, but high enough to prevent fouling. This is called “Thermal Performance”, and is determined by the heat range.
    Plug Replacement Time: Unfortunately, there is no fixed answer to this. As spark plugs grow older, they lose their sharp edges as material from the centre and ground electrodes are slowly eroded away. As the gap between these two points grows, the voltage required to bridge the gap increases proportionately. Even the best ignition systems will be strained to supply enough voltage to completely burn the fuel.
    #11
  12. TheMuffinMan

    TheMuffinMan Forest Ranger Magnet

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    I put iridiums in my 950 2,500 miles ago and I definitely notice a difference starting and on the low to mid-range. It's worth the money in my book.
    #12
  13. gefr

    gefr Life is a trip

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    My mechanic said they have a thinner point so more prone to damage, due to high motor temperatures. I now use NGK CR8EK.
    #13
  14. bikyto

    bikyto Dans le doute...gaz!

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    I didn't see/feel any difference either
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  15. V-rider

    V-rider Been here awhile

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    In an attempt to slow the spread of misinformation...

    I think your mechanic may be confusing two different possible issues. "Damage" and durability are two different things.

    A precious metal (platinum or iridium), fine electrode spark plug design was created to be more durable under high temperatures than the common nickel plug design. That's one major reason why they are made! Auto and powersport manufacturers prefer to use this design if their bean-counters will let them.

    If someone has "high motor temperatures" then they have more to worry about than the firing end design (or material) of their spark plugs.

    If your cylinder temperatures are too high then your spark plug firing end temperature could also be too high. It doesn't matter which design of plug you have in there - regular or fine electrode - both will be damaged if you experience pre-ignition (not to be confused with knock). (By the way, the term "detonation" is sometimes used interchangeably with knock, but knock is the more correct term. Knock is different from the phenomena called pre-ignition.) Your engine will most likely suffer severe damage if you experience pre-ignition.

    The firing end ceramic insulator shape is what mainly determines the heat range of the spark plug. The heat range is the most important factor to consider when replacing your plugs. Just don't install a heat range hotter than what is recommended - you will risk pre-ignition.

    The metal electrode shape or material really has nothing to do with the heat range - but the precious metal, fine electrode design will last longer.

    Along with durability, the fine electrode design also provides better ignitability.

    Most engine designs will respond favorably to a plug with better ignitability. If you don't notice a difference using your five senses - then probably only a gas analyzer will show the improvement. If that is the case, and you don't care how long it is between your plug replacement intervals, then don't bother spending the extra money.

    I run NGK iridium plugs. I get them cheap because I am a Test Engineer for NGK (not bragging - just throwing that out there to lend credibility to my words.)

    OK. Nuff said. Thanks for reading.
    #15
  16. bikyto

    bikyto Dans le doute...gaz!

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    Thanks v-rider for the explanation
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  17. Zander

    Zander Been here awhile

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    Great explanation. Thank you for taking time to write it. :thumb
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  18. gefr

    gefr Life is a trip

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    In an attempt to slow the spread of misinformation...

    A precious metal (platinum or iridium), fine electrode spark plug design was created to be more durable under high temperatures than the common nickel plug design.

    If your cylinder temperatures are too high then your spark plug firing end temperature could also be too high. It doesn't matter which design of plug you have in there - regular or fine electrode - both will be damaged if you experience pre-ignition (not to be confused with knock). But iridium spark plugs withstand better in high cylinder temperatures if yjere is no pre-ignition?
    (By the way, the term "detonation" is sometimes used interchangeably with knock, but knock is the more correct term. Knock is different from the phenomena called pre-ignition.) Your engine will most likely suffer severe damage if you experience pre-ignition. I am not familiar with these terms. I thought detonation is what happens at the exaust reason being very poor mixture, knock caused by too much advance for the given gas and pre ignition is???

    The firing end ceramic insulator shape is what mainly determines the heat range of the spark plug. The heat range is the most important factor to consider when replacing your plugs. Just don't install a heat range hotter than what is recommended - you will risk pre-ignition. So what is the heat range of a spark plug. Is it related to the temp the spark plug can endure or the length of the spark or what?

    Along with durability, the fine electrode design also provides better ignitability.
    #18
  19. charlie264

    charlie264 Long timer

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    Welcome.
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  20. Zander

    Zander Been here awhile

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    Great discussion. From what I gather, it seems to makes sense to install iridium plugs. Or am I wrong ?
    #20