Around South America and beyond

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by cejnys, Sep 26, 2014.

  1. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    I did not stay long in Lombok; the island looked cool but nothing special. I was more curious about the next few island that were coming after.

    Lombok is pretty small so it took only few hours to get to the port. Ferries were going every hour so it was easy to cross to Sumbawa. Due to its frequency ferries are not overloaded

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    We met many people on the ferry and everybody was extremely friendly. Before we left we had few recommendations what to see and what to do in Sumbawa. Even though many people in Bali and Lombok suggested that Sumbawa was boring I started to have slightly different feeling.

    It was extremely easy to find the first camp spot in Sumbawa; the first impression from the island was really cool. Everybody was chilled and there were not that many people. It kind of looked like empty place comparing to Bali and Lombok.

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    In the morning when I was packing my stuff I realized there were many palm trees with coconuts on them. That was all I needed to accept my own personal challenge; I had to get one of these coconuts for breakfast. To be honest it looks much easier than it actually is.

    My first attempt was pretty pathetic but I learned quite a bit from it

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    Good thing was that I started to think about the climbing technique slightly differently. Few more tries and suddenly I had an arrangement that allowed me to lock my legs around the tree so I could actually go up. I used one strap from my hammock and connected both legs. Then kept the strap on closed side of the tree and wrapped my legs around the tree. The hammock strap surprisingly locked on the tree and I could push my whole body up. Then I had to hold myself with my arms only and move the legs up and repeat it again and again.

    Not sure how tall the tree was but I would think between 10 - 15 meters.

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    I was really happy ho get my first coconut

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    Locals, which were extremely entertain by my performance lent me a machete to get inside of the coconut

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    It tasted really good

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  2. DunkingBird

    DunkingBird Been here awhile

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    A Coconut likes to travel as well :-)



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  3. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Hey Radim I don't know if it's too late, but if you want to relax by the beach for a while and have a go at surfing. Lakey's beach down south is pretty damn good. We spent 3 or 4 nice lazy days down there.
    cejnys likes this.
  4. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    Hey Graeme, good hearing from you and thatns for the recommendation! I'm still a bit behind with this rr, but I actually visited Lakey's beach and stayed for few nights. It was really cool spot. You probably felt like home while there, many Aussie guys around.
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  5. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    Many small islands in Indonesia are totally empty or with few small villages around their coast.

    I really wanted to see one of these islands and Sumbawa island was just perfect for this type of adventure. The island I wanted to see was called Moyo. Apparently there was a secret resort which hosted many celebrities, I believe that somebody said that princess Diana liked it there. Except of the resort there was noting, no infrastructure, only few villages around.

    I wanted to enter from the south side, make it through the island and leave on the north side close to Tambora volcano. On a piece paper it sounded easy, in reality it was a bit more challenging. The first part was to find a boat that would take my 990 and Matthias's GS to the island. I believe that no other bikes than a small scooters were ever brought to the island.

    First we rode to the closest point to the island and found very small fisherman village and started asking about possible transport to Mayo island. Everybody was interested in our bikes but nobody was willing to take us there.

    This was the top boss of the village and even he was very worried when looking at our bikes

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    To be totally honest their boats were extremely small; I would still go for it but there was nobody around who was willing to take us there. On this photo you can see the type of boats they had. Moyo island was very close but still very far for us

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    Then another guy showed up and told us that we should go back to Sumbawa Besar and try the main port. Apparently there were some boats going to Moyo every day. One hour later we were there. We found few boats and they were much bigger than the ones in the village. It looked very promising. Then we started talking to their captains and we were back to square one. They knew we wanted to go on the island and they were asking for loads of $$$$. I left disappointed because nobody wanted to negotiate the price. At that point all looked pretty bad.

    Then I looked at the google maps again and spotted a diving shop not far away from the port. I knew that divers are using bigger boat and thought that they may help us to get to the island.

    When we arrived we found a small bamboo hut on a beach with very cool guy who could speak excellent english. After 10 min of conversation my hope was back up. Apparently there was a boat that was coming from Moyo island the next day and that they would be willing to take our bikes. And the price he asked for was 10 times less than the people at the port. I felt like we just scored a jackpot. Also he offered that we could stay in his house until the next day.

    This is the diving shop; very basic but extremely comfortable

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    The owner was involved in saving sea turtles; he is looking after then until they are bigger so birds don't eat them. I thought that was really cool

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    The next door neighbors had a small kid. He totally loved our bikes and wanted to practice so we went for a ride on his super machine

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  6. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    Surprisingly the next morning everything was happening exactly as we were told by the owner of the diving school the day before. We showed up at the port around 11am and 30 minutes later there was a boat; it looked big enough to fit both of our bikes on it.

    They were totally ready for us; with a small ramp we easily put both bikes on the boat

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    After 30 more minutes we were on our way. Everything was so fast, I did not even believe it was happening. For the first time, I was traveling on a small wooden boat together with the bike.

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    For the locals this was just a routine journey back home

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    After about 2 hours we arrived to the island. From the boat the village looked really small. Few houses and one pier.

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    Getting both bike off the boat was as easy as putting them on

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    After getting few supplies we were ready to dive into the jungle. Locals suggested that there should be a very nice waterfall about 10 kilometers inside of the island. One guy showed us a single track which should led us all the way to the waterfall. Yeah it was definitely the first time this size of bike was riding this path

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    After about one hour, with little bit of struggle at the end we finally found the waterfall. Normally I am not excited about waterfalls; this time it was slightly different. The effort we had to use to get there and also remoteness of this place really appealed to me.

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    It did not take long to find a perfect spot for hanging my hammock; I think this was one of the best camping spots I ever had.

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    Waterfall visit would not be complete without refreshing swim; the next morning I just dived in the little pools and it was superbly refreshing. The whole place was just amazing

    [​IMG]
  7. DunkingBird

    DunkingBird Been here awhile

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    That's a heartwearming part of your journey.
    Am I mistaken or show the eyes of the little adventurer some scepticism :D

  8. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    I saw only determination in his eyes. He was even making great 75 degrees V-twin sound. Another adventurer was born that day!
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  9. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    After the nigh at the waterfall I wanted to cross the island and try to get a boat from the other side of the island to Tambora. When you look at the map it only makes sense to do it this way.

    The only challenge was that there were not any roads on any map we had and that locals were not much of a help. The conversations went normally like this:

    me: hey mister, road to north of island
    local guy: yes mister
    me: which way?
    Local guy: yes mister
    me: so you dont know which way
    local guy: yes mister

    Anyway, we set off into the jungle using our GPS to see our location in relation to the whole island. It worked quite well because the island was pretty small. Just to give you an idea about the "roads" we were taking were all like this and much worse. It was more like a path for donkeys, this part was one of the nicer ones

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    One point we had to decide which way to go because the road was splitting in two. After this crossroad we started heading north which was promising. The road was good despite some local challenges

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    After one hour we arrived at the point where the road just finished. In the middle of the jungle, just like this....

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    We tried to find out whether the trail was continuing somewhere else but we were unsuccessful. In radius of few hundred meters there was nothing. We had to turn around and go back until the trail split. The second trail was not going up north but was taking us to the east coast. One point we started to descent towards the coast and a small village. Humans presence was obvious and we were pretty excited because we were hungry and very thirsty. I was at the front and suddenly the bike got a huge hit and I ended up in a fence. I was like wtf have just happened.

    I looked back and the only thing I could see was my right box lying on the path. The first thing was to get my bike out of the fence and then I was trying to find all the parts from the box that flew off

    I could immediately see what happened. There was a big piece of a tree reminder on the right hand side of the path. I saw it and wanted to avoid it. What I did not see was a much smaller piece of an old tree which was about one meter before the big one hidden in a small bush. This was the obstacle that hit with my case and split it from the frame. You cannot see the small tree on the photo, is really well hidden

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    The right case was a bit damaged but nothing serious; medium sized stone put everything back into the shape.

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    The case carrier frame on the bike had a bigger problem

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    one of the main bolts just sheared

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    It took me about 1 hour to make it little bit straighter so the case could be mounted back to the frame. Then we rode into the village to get some water and food. At that point I was quite exhausted because I did not pack enough water for the jungle and for the last 2 hours I did not have any water.

    The village was really small and everybody was very interested in us. They never saw a bike like ours and probably they never saw any westerner either. We found a small shop selling water and noodles but we could not find a place that would sell prepared food. We were hungry so we started cooking ourselves in the middle of the village

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    After the delicious instant noodles we went to the port to see what kind of boats they have. It was a bit disappointing look because all the boats were very small.

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    At that point a guy showed up who could speak decent English and assured us that the next morning there would be a much bigger boat coming which would take our bikes. Then he offered his house for u to stay over the night.

    It was a decent and comfortable house

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    He probably invited half of the village, but it was fun to hang out with locals

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    After the tea I started fixing the panniers frame; with a little help of a local guy I made it nearly perfect. Well it was definitely much better than before the hit. This was the village mechanic who was helping; he definitely did not like to smile, even for the camera

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    I was really tired after fixing the bike but happy that all worked well at the end. The guy who hosted us even offered some food

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    The next morning we had to be at the port at 6am. Apparently the tide should be high so we should be able to load our bikes on the bigger boat. When we made it to the port we were speechless. There was not any bigger boat; two of them that were leaving were pretty small but the captains were willing to take our bikes after they return back later that day. Also the price they were asking for was high. It sounded that the guy who promised the bigger boat was just making everything up.

    [​IMG]
  10. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    At that point it looked like we did not have a way how to transport our bikes to Tambora. In my mind I was thinking whether we can put both bikes on the boat that was available in this village. They were very small boats but it looked like both bikes should fit on them.

    When the two morning boats with local people left for Tambora I could see that there was one more boat that stayed in the port. Many people came to say good bye to their family members while leaving the village. That was good for us because one of them was a guy who could speak okish english and mainly he knew a captain of the third boat. He asked us whether we wanted to talk to the captain about taking our bikes to Tambora; I was like yeah, bring him here; I was curious to see his reactions when he sees our bikes.

    20 min later the captain showed up; it was obvious he was quite nervous when he looked at the bikes and our "translator" told him what we wanted to do. Then he walked on the pier from one side to another for about 15min and looked a bit worried. To be honest I did not have a good feeling from it. Then he came to us and draw a price into sand. It was quite expensive. I looked at Matthias and he was not impressed with the price either. The thing was that we did not have many options and the captain knew it.

    We had nothing to lose if we barter the price; I turned back to the captain and told him that I would accept half of the price he asked for few minutes ago. Surprisingly he agreed and we shook our hands.

    At that point we had a deal but nobody knew how to put our bikes on the boat and mainly how to put them off. One thing which was not helping was the tide. The water was slowly disappearing and therefore we could not load the bikes from the pier. I found on the internet that the next high tide which would reach the pier would be the next day at 3am.

    While I was talking to Matthias about possible ways how to put our bikes on the boat, the captain pushed his boat about 2 meters away from the pier and disappeared.

    It is hard to see the boat on this photo because its before the pier just under the bikes.

    [​IMG]
  11. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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  12. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    While everybody disappeared and the boat was just slowly starting to hit rocks at the sea bottom I started to see what the captain wanted to do.

    When the tide was at its lowest point the boat was on its belly and rocked towards the pier. The space between the boat and pier was mostly dry so it would be ok to drive our bikes there.

    Because the communication was a bit of challenge we had no clue whether the captain will help us to load he bikes, so we started to prepare our own plan. On a beach I found an old ship wreck and managed to get a piece of it to our boat. It was partially rotten but I believed that it would hold our bikes if supported in the middle.

    Matthias was not sure whether it can hold his GS

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    Few minutes later the captain showed up with two long and solid pieces of wood. Suddenly it was obvious that he actually had a plan and was getting ready to make it happen

    after using the wood that the captain brought it was easy, I would even say very easy to put both bikes on the boat.

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    all loading took about 20 minutes and then we just had to wait for the sea to go up again

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    I dont remember exactly, I think it took 2 to 3 hours to get enough water so we could start our return journey to Sumbawa island.

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    the bikes took most of the loading space of the boat; it was a narrow/long boat so every little wave rocked it quite a bit. We were lucky because the sea was calm that day. On one side I was relieved because we were moving the right direction with both bikes on the boat. Unfortunately there was one unknown, we had no clue how to take the bikes off. The captain was mentioning that the pier in Tambora was very high and that its not possible to use it. At that point I did not care and believed that we would somehow find a solution when we arrive.
  13. MaNDan

    MaNDan 'Old Japanese cycles & '26Chevy truck

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    Once in awhile you say that a small and light bike is the way to go. But
    nobody can say that you guys like to pack light.
  14. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    SHIT SHIT SHIT, why do I have to lose my Klim jacket right now!

    This morning I rode from a hotel to a phone shop to get internet. It was a short ride so I strapped my jacket to my bag. I went into the shop, when I walked out the jacket was gone.

    I'm so pissed off right now! It was my everyday protection for the last 3 years and 130000 km

    Hey guys, does anyone here knows somebody from Klim? I would like to ask them whether they can help me with a jacket. Right now I cannot afford another one. This came in totally worst time ever as Australia is coming!
  15. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    Whoa, crazy flip-flop :uhoh
    First i was elated by how you got the bikes loaded for journey, now bummed that your jacket is gone.
    Best to you in sorting that quickly and smoothly. Wish i could help. Police, surveillance video... ??
  16. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    This is a really good point .......


    There are few main reasons why I am carrying so much stuff. I don't like it and every time I'm cleaning my cases and the soft bags I'm trying to get rid of as many things as possible. Nevertheless there are still many of them that I cannot through away or change for smaller.


    One of the biggest item is my tent. I needed this size when I was traveling with Lauren. Together with my hiking rain coat it's taking half of the space in the touratech big soft bag. The second half of the bag is taken by my sidi boots and Klim pants. Both of them are good products but just way to uncomfortable to use them. I rather wear my hiking boots and Dainese Kevlar riding jeans, even when is raining.


    Another big part of the space is taken by spare parts for my 990; mainly the clutch and all wheel bearings, I believed it would be necessary to change them much earlier. Also I have a small torque wrench, valve shims set and all the tools for the service. I want to be totally independent. I just need a little space and I can do all the service myself.


    The small bag at the top of the touratech big bag holds air mat, sleeping bag and hammock. This is how I sleep these day. It's very easy to pull it out so I can be in my bed within 10 min after arrival. Or I can just grab the bag and walk somewhere where I can set up my bed.


    If I was using small bike, I would do things differently from the beginning.


    I would not have riding and hiking boots, only good quality hiking boots.

    Smaller bike doesn't need as many tools and I would not take spare parts (the spare brake pads would be inside of the bash plate)

    I would take a smaller computer

    I would not take a tent. I would try to get a hammock that can be used as a tent if necessary

    Small compressor - change to a small hand pump (much lighter)

    Levers for tires change (inside of a bash plate)

    My riding jacked would be much lighter than Klim jacket and should be well vented with a rain jacket cover (also usable for hiking) and it would also have a down inner insert against cold (also usable for hiking or normal wear).


    No changes:
    Cooking gear - I'm very happy with it
    Down sleeping bag - maybe a bit smaller than my current
    Air mattress
  17. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    The jacket is gone forever; i went around and offered 1,000,000 rupiahs for the jacket. Nobody was really interested, they just told me to buy another one. It was hard to explain to these people that I don't have $$$ to do it.
  18. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    :waysad
  19. DunkingBird

    DunkingBird Been here awhile

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    This sums up my alterations nicely. Using my old army boots (military service is mandatory in switzerland and so you can buy them really cheap as a second hand) ....
    [​IMG]


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  20. cejnys

    cejnys Been here awhile

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    yeah, these would be perfect. Enough protection for the bike and comfy to walk around and hike. I know that swiss are doing all their stuff really well so they should last for a while.

    Matthias, the swiss biker traveling with me right now just mentioned that they are really well made just not the best in snow; that doesn't really bothers me, I am not planning to visit Himalayas during a winter again!