Around the States in 60 Days....ish.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Bambooda, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. Bambooda

    Bambooda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Oddometer:
    75
    Location:
    Toronto
    Yellowstone:

    Now that we had completed those 2 roads, it was time to head into the park. Since we camped near Red Lodge it was just a short drive into the park. We heard the campsites fill early so we drove as quickly as we could. We arrived in the park shortly before 10am. It seems that we weren't even close to showing up in time, as when we arrived at the entrance to the campground (Slough Creek) the sign out front showed full. Despite this, we decided to drive into the campground. Lucky for us, we managed to snag 1 of the 2 open sites which people had just vacated. We've got horseshoes, baby. As we were setting up our tent we saw vehicle after vehicle pull in, drive around, and then leave after discovering no open sites. If I were to do it again, I would try to book a site in one of the private campgrounds well ahead of time. However, this would have put a heavy constraint on the earlier days of the trip.

    YELLOWSTONE, DAY 1:

    Since we arrived so early on the first day, we had some time to do some exploring in the afternoon. For those of you that don't know, Yellowstone has a series of highways that roughly make the shape of an "8" which connect a lot of the major highlights of the park. We took the northwest road out to mammoth springs. Certainly, one of the most unique landscapes I've seen in my life, for Chelsey it was reminiscent of the Pamukkale Travertines in Turkey.

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    After leaving the Mammoth Springs, we headed east back towards our camp, however, we split off the main loop road to take 1 of the remaining 2 dirt roads left in Yellowstone. The Blacktail Plateau Drive is a one way, 6 mile drive, which follows one of the old Indian trails through the park. It is a common road people take early in the morning or in the evening in order to see wildlife. It was nice for us just to get out of the traffic from the main road. Yes, traffic...

    It was a very pleasant road that goes through some great scenery that any bike could do if the road is dry. We would recommend it if you're planning a visit. :thumbup

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    Once returning to the main loop rd and heading back to our campsite, we were greeted by some very ominous looking clouds in the distance. I'm assuming that's what put snow on Beartooth.

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    On one of our "test trips" before leaving on our big one, we had rain for the entirety of one of the days. It was then that it occurred to us that we didn't have any practical shelter options. On my solo trip to Alaska, my 2 person tent had sufficient room to lay out gear, use my laptop, and keep all my stuff sheltered when it rained. With 2 bodies and twice the amount of gear, we need a new solution. After a quick bit of research it seemed a tarp would be the most versatile, economical option. So of course, as soon as we got back to the camp, we exercised our sweet new tarp skills. Of course, our initial setup was less than....elegant, but we got it up and it worked like a charm. It rained all evening and we had space underneath to stretch out, cook some food, and enjoy watching the rain come down.

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    As you can see, we have a second, cheapo blue tarp. This is a MUST BRING for anyone! It's light and can be strapped anywhere on the bike. It doesn't need to be protected. We toss our gear on it every night, fold up the edges, fold it over and either peg it down or put some rocks on it. No bugs, dew, rain, or dust gets to it; it's very well sealed and requires almost zero setup. We call it the "Gear Taco".

    Of course, once it stopped raining, it got COOOOOOLLLLDDDDD. Like, stupid cold. It all FROZE!

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    It was that night I realized that I had, in fact, not prepared properly for the cold. I had put on almost all the layers I had brought, (which was a lot) but the sleeping bag I brought just wasn't suitable. I even busted out the space blanket, which helped marginally. I've been avoiding buying a proper sleeping bag for quite a while... Looks like it might be time to go shopping...especially since it looked like we would have a few more days to deal with the cold. :vardy Maybe if I had one of these, I would have been okay.....

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    Chelsey on the other hand... She was fine. :jkam

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    YELLOWSTONE, DAY 2:

    Our second day in the park was a full day to tour around the park and visit some highlights. The speed limit of 45 mph (73kph) gives you a good excuse to take it easy and enjoy the extremely scenic roads of the park. And besides, with so many people there, you're lucky to approach the speed limit sometimes. To be honest, I think it could be the most hazardous place we've driven so far. And remember, we went through Chicago! Forget the wildlife, the other drivers are the thing you've got to watch out for! One second you're cruising 40mph next thing you realize, there's an RV STOPPED around the corner taking pictures of a deer, or a buffalo, or maybe they saw a formation in the rock that looks like Brad Pitt or something. People are crazy. :fpalm Speaking of Buffalo, one of the things we learned in Badlands NP is that the technical name for Buffalo is "Bison Bison", and really that they're not Buffalo at all. Buffalo are what you find in Africa.

    Chelsey got to see her first Bison Bison! As such, here's a picture!

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    Our first highlight to see that day was the Grand Prismatic Spring. The crisp morning air really accentuated the steam of the various springs and geyers alongside the roadway and nearby rivers. It was almost magical seeing such a different and living landscape. The vibrant colours of the prismatic springs was quite the sight. Unfortunately, the chill of the air created so much steam, it masked the scale of the Grand Prismatic Spring.

    Next stop was the obligatory visit to Old Faithful. Another, very unique, piece of the landscape which is something that is must see. Truthfully, I didn't find it too thrilling and was more entertained by the excitement of the wild mobs which gathered to observe. Sitting in anticipation, listening to the yelps of excitement from surrounding people as the countdown to the next eruption was closing: "oh my goodness! It just bubbled! I saw it!" ... and the geyeser becomes still again... "Oh look! it's about to go!!" (as some extra steam is spit out the top). This carried on sporadically in the 15 min leading up to the eruption. Of course, upon erupting great cries of joy and awe were heard from the crowd. Lastly, as the eruption came to an end... Applause. People applauded the Earth. People are crazy.

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    Our final stop for the day was the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. It certainly lives up to it's name. At it's deepest point it's about 1,200 ft top to bottom, and can stretch to about 4000 ft wide. Something that makes it extra unique are the vibrant, varying colours of the rock produced by the different mineral deposits. Something that becomes very obvious is why the park is called "Yellowstone". The majority of faces of the canyon are nearly a canary yellow. They have many incredible lookout points just off the road you can walk to to get a good view.

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    As we returned to our site again, the sky was becoming thick with smoke. It was apparent the forest fire in the northern part of the park was worsening. We became worried they might close the campground we were in and we would have to pack up and find another place to stay. Luckily, we were assured there was nothing to be concerned about and the fire hadn't jumped the river a few miles away from the campground. However, as the sun set a sinister glow from the fire could be seen over the mountain. Chelsey and I hopped on the KLR and we drove out to get a better view.

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    Luckily, by morning we were still alive so we packed up our stuff and headed out. As the road to the south was still closed, we left through the west entrance and drove south through Idaho to get to Jackson. We still managed to glimpse the Grand Tetons on the way down.

    Sitting in Jackson now being hosted by @pratered, unfortunately, another host we were unable to grab a picture of as he left for a trip early in the morning.

    Next stop: MOAB!
    #41
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  2. Marc LaDue

    Marc LaDue Been here awhile

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    Location:
    Hancock Township, Plymouth County, Iowa
    Great shot of Chelsea all wrapped up! I guess Jeff you'll just have to reminisce about those memorable days in Iowa and think warm. Or, in the alternative, you can project into the future a bit, as you're likely to warm up again in Moab. Enjoy the Schaeffer Switchbacks!

    LaDue
    #42
  3. Mr. Bagel

    Mr. Bagel Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Take the Hummer tour. It's cool.
    #43
  4. JHpowderhound

    JHpowderhound Been here awhile

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    Feb 28, 2014
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    Location:
    Jackson, WY
    Welcome to Jackson!
    #44
  5. LWRider

    LWRider Been here awhile

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    Aug 4, 2011
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    Location:
    Lake Wales, Central Florida
    Good move changing the route to pass through northeastern Utah. I was just up there a couple months ago and loved it between Flaming Gorge and Vernal.
    #45
  6. Carl Stark

    Carl Stark Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Sheridan WY
    So glad you enjoyed Beartooth and Chief Joseph Highway!
    #46
  7. Bambooda

    Bambooda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Toronto
    We're back! Chelsey here:

    Once we headed South from Jackson, it started becoming MUCH warmer and we noticed that civilization was more sparsely dispersed. We drove through Dinosaur, CO on our way and stopped for a picture because dinosaurs are always cool. :nod

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    After Dinosaur, we were continuing along the road when we saw a sign that said "through traffic take the interstate." Normally we try to avoid interstates, and our GPS said to take a left, so off we went to the left onto a secondary paved road. We continued down this road for another 20-30 miles or so, and the road began to turn left while the GPS told us to go right - which was very odd as there was no clear road to the right. We then noticed this narrow sandy opening in the road which was labelled "Kokopelli Trail" and was very clearly an ATV off-road route. Did google maps (the basis for Furkot and our trip) really pick this road for us to drive? We were - quite literally - in the middle of no where and this wasn't exactly the ideal circumstances to test our off-road chops at 2 in the afternoon with the sun beating down on us with the nearest town 60 miles away.

    First thought: "Oh crap." Second thought: "Here goes nothing..."

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    This was the point in the trip where the "bootcamp" that Jeff put me through before the trip on off-road routes and tougher unmaintained roads was clearly both necessary and beneficial.

    We set off on the trail and encountered some deep ruts, sandy patches (and let me add that sand and I are in a rather unhealthy and complicated relationship at the moment) and spots where the trail dissappeared completely and we were driving right next to the railroad track.

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    We finally saw the route open up into a more defined gravel road and we felt a wave of relief that we made it through with no issues. It was not the most difficult trail that either of us have driven, but as we were in the middle of nowhere with no civilization in sight, we were really glad that nothing went wrong! :ricky

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    After we found our feet back on the pavement, we landed in Moab. We stopped at the KOA Campground to ask how much it would be per night and they quoted us $37.50/night!!! :eek2 Definitely above our budget. I remembered seeing an RV park with a sign for tentspace, so we drove back and they quoted us $10/night - sold! It wasn't much (basically a picnic table at the back of an RV parking lot) but they had toilets, showers and laundry so we were happy and we settled in for the next 4 nights.

    Day 1 in Moab was the first day that Jeff and I went our separate ways - Jeff went to drive the white rim trail (more on that later) while I went in to Canyonlands Island in the Sky district to do some hiking trails and explore the area. We both woke up early at about 5:15am (Jeff to beat the heat and my goal was sunrise pictures in the park) and set off for Canyonlands. After wishing Jeff good luck, my first stop was Mesa Arch which is a famous sunrise spot in the park. I was a few minutes late and there was already a crowd that had set up their cameras at the Arch - more than expected for 6:30 in the morning! I was able to get some really nice pictures of the Arch.

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    After Mesa Arch, I drove to the Grand View Point Overlook and opted to do the 2 mile hike. While I was on the trail, I heard a faint "vroooooom" in the distance and quickly switched to my zoom lens while Jeff drove by me many miles below. Let's play "Where's Waldo":

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    Once Jeff was out of sight, I continued along to the end of the trail and was rewarded with some spectacular views of Canyonlands.

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    I then set out to the Upheaval Dome overlook trail, another 1 mile round-trip hike. The upheaval dome is a geological mystery - they are not quite sure how it was formed. The two main theories are that it is a salt dome pushed up out of the rocks over millions of years, or an eroded impact crater due to the circular nature of the dome. The blue rocks were quite beautiful.

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    Jeff and I had decided to meet at the McDonalds in Moab for an easy meeting location - and amazingly 5.5 hours later - we arrived within 10 mins of each other. I was happy to see him arrive since I didn't have enough time to worry about whether something went wrong on his ride. Stay tuned for Jeff's report on the white rim trail! :clap
    #47
  8. Hoodcounty

    Hoodcounty Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    209
    Great adventure so far!

    Could you tell me where those side cases came from, they look interesting.
    #48
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  9. ThePackTrack

    ThePackTrack Been here awhile

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    May 22, 2015
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    Sydney, Australia
    Great write up, keep them coming.

    Sent from my GT-I8200L using Tapatalk
    #49
  10. Mr. Bagel

    Mr. Bagel Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
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    15
    Happy Birthday, Jeffrey. Hope you guys had fun. Please check texts.
    #50
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  11. LookingHard

    LookingHard Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2011
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    53
    Location:
    USA
    #51
  12. Bambooda

    Bambooda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Oddometer:
    75
    Location:
    Toronto
    Moab day 1 for Jeff: The White Rim Trail!!!!! (Sorry @Marc LaDue , I couldn't resist doing the whole thing. I wanted to beat myself up on a trail for hours. Don't you remember, I'm one of those crazy enduro riders!!!)

    WOW! Before I get to any specifics or details, I'll just say it's an incredible ride. The scenery is outstanding, and the trail is very interesting. As Chelsey mentioned, I got up early to try and beat the heat (unsuccessfully) and I got some great views of the scenery during sunrise.

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    As far as difficulty, the vast majority of the trail is easy going dirt/sand/gravel with some slickrock scattered throughout which could be ridden through on something like a Triumph Bonneville. However, I would say that there are spots that are challenging enough that I wouldn't want to be out there on an adventure bike bigger than my KLR. If you consider yourself an excellent rider and have considerable off-road experience, getting through unscathed on a GS 1200 is doable. From doing research online and talking to other people about their experiences, it sounds like the condition of the trails can vary depending on when the trail was last cleaned up, washed out, ripped up by a 4WD, etc... On a good day, it sounds like you can just putt up the hills in first or second gear without any fancy maneuvers. Myself, I ended up coming around a tight, steep, gravelly, switchback right into a drainage rut with loose rocks where I had to think fast to pop the bike up a ledge 10-12" high in order to maintain momentum. If I had gotten off the bike and looked ahead first, I could have picked a better line. But where's the excitement in that?!?!

    Here's what the trail is like for a lot if the ride.

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    Stuff like this keeps the KLR from going too fast... Those squishy little forks have a hard time holding up 20+ liters of gas and a bigger guy like me on big bumps like that. I was smacking the fork brace on the fender quite often.

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    Ok, so details about the ride:

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    My overall time was: 4:51

    I had aimed to do it in 4hrs. As you can see, if I hadn't stopped to take pictures, deal with some bike problems, go to the washroom, etc. I could have done it in about 3:45 (The GPS accidentally shut off for a short while during the ride). Admittedly, I probably went a bit too fast as I was a bit hard on the bike; I bottomed the suspension a few more times than I would like. And I worried about my luggage a bit, I really put it to the test.

    I did the ride pretty much fully loaded. The only thing I had removed was my duffel bag (Tent, sleeping bag x2, mattress x2, tarp, pillows).

    The bike carried:
    Me (210lbs) + gear
    All my tools, clothing, parts that were in the panniers and tool tube
    3L of water in backpack
    4L of water in a starbucks coffee box, bladder, thingy. Put in one of the panniers.
    Full tank of gas (23L)

    Relevant bike mods (or lack thereof):
    Progressive Suspension rear shock
    Eagle Mike Fork Brace
    Engine Ice coolant (more foreshadowing!!!)
    Happy Trails skid plate, highway pegs, and rad guard (not crash bars)
    22 psi front tire
    25 psi rear tire
    Stock front suspension (This is what slowed me down the most)

    So why is the Engine Ice coolant important??? When I bought the bike I had no idea what was in it for cooling. When I rode the bike around during summer, the temp needle would sit comfortably near 1/2, right above the little thermometer. Before winter I drained the mystery fluid and decided to opt for the fancy stuff. Now when I ride around on any day less than 30 deg, at cruising speed the needle only sits at about 1/3 the way to H. Ok, so cool, through some sorcery this fluid actually cools an engine pretty darn well.

    So where does this fit in? Well when I was down there on the trail, it was hot, stupid hot, it had to be 35+ deg C. Here I am cruising up a long, fairly steep grade in probably 2nd gear. You know, just doing my thing. I get to the top and stop to take in the view. I look down at my dash and I see the temp needle just PINNED to the H. I've never seen it go that high. So I shut off the bike.... *gurggle gurggle gurggle slurp gurggle*.... "What the heck is that noise???.... HOLY CRAP MY COOLANT'S BOILING OVER". Engine Ice supposedly boils at 124 deg C. I figure if I just had water in my rad I could have been in serious trouble. So what the frig?!??! Turns out my damn rad fan isn't working again. "NOT THE TIME KLR. NOT COOL". Luckily, now that I was at the top of a hill, I coasted down the other side and was able to get the needle off H. From that point I tried to keep my speed constant and my revs low to keep the temp down until I had a chance to look at what might be wrong.

    Upon seeing a washroom which cast a convenient shadow to work in, I pulled over to have a look at the bike. From those of you who followed along my Alaska journey, you know I had some rad fan troubles then too. http://advrider.com/index.php?threa...o-alaska-and-back.885952/page-4#post-21502485 . I learned some good troubleshooting skills and where all the pieces where concerned with that circuit.

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    Immediately, I yanked the seat and tank to get access to the electrical. Check for broken cables... check grounding the sensor cable to see if I could hear the relay going...nothing. K. try swapping the relay (I brought a spare). Nothing. Damn, must be a bad wire somewhere... how do I get around this???

    I found the power plug for the fan and disconnected it. Perfect, 2 male spade connectors. I had some wire with female spade connectors on it hanging around in the bike that used to be hooked up to a switch to override the fan relay. The switch went bad and I just had the wire left... I chopped a section out, stripped the end opposite the spade connectors and wrapped it around the (+) battery terminal. Took the live spade connector and connected it to one of the open connectors to the fan: *POOF* *Big spark and a wisp of smoke* "WWOOOAAAHHH NOT THAT ONE" Tried the other one: "BINGO, FAN'S RUNNIN', BABY!!"

    Man: 4, Gremlin: 0. HAHAHAHAHA

    With my fan running 100% of the time, the engine ran nice and cool and I cruised though the rest of the trail.

    On my way back to camp I bought a $10 multi meter from a Radioshack. I tore the bike down again and started digging.

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    Dead, everywhere. No connection to the battery from any part of the fan circuit back to the battery. Pull out the wiring diagram... What am I missing???.... Following the lines back from the fan to the battery.... wait, what is that.... "OH MAN, I FORGOT THE FUSE". yup. It was just a burnt fuse. That little white capsule behind the right side tank cowling. And conveniently, a spare fuse was sitting right next to it in the little housing. I could've prevented taking anything off the bike in the first place... :baldy. Oh well, going over the bike with the multi meter gave me a chance to ensure there wasn't something shorting out causing the fuse to blow. Turns out it was just an old fuse or something.

    All-in-all, the White-rim was amazing and I'd recommend it to anyone looking for a bit of an endurance challenge during their trip. I've attached the GPS tracks for the ride which also includes most of the washrooms. Feel free to PM me with any questions!

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    Attached Files:

    #52
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  13. Bambooda

    Bambooda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Oddometer:
    75
    Location:
    Toronto
    Hey @Hoodcounty,

    The panniers were introduced to us by @ERTW while they stayed at our house for tent space. They are light, durable, and and can be relatively easily mounted/dismounted to the bike. One of the primary reasons I chose these panniers, is that the design was conducive to fabricating my own luggage racks. No special clips or proprietary hardware required. Being HDPE, they are also weldable. Up until very recently they've been great and worked perfect for us. However, I damaged one. I'm not sure any pannier would have survived what I did to it though... more on that later! Overall I would recommend them. Here's the website: http://acmezoom.com/.

    When we have a lul (if ever) we will try to put a post about the gear and equipment we used during the trip. Feel free to ask about anything specific in the meantime!
    #53
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  14. Byah

    Byah Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Oddometer:
    59
    Location:
    Australia
    Hey guys, Thanks so much for sending the trail map through. Hopefully I can follow in ure footsteps soon!
    #54
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  15. Marc LaDue

    Marc LaDue Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    392
    Location:
    Hancock Township, Plymouth County, Iowa
    Glad to hear disaster was averted in regards to your cooling system! Too bad we're not clairvoyant; I've got three or four of those Harbor Freight Multi-Meters brand-new and unused just sitting in my basement. Oh well, next time maybe.
    Chelsea's pix are awesome, by the way. Hope the next stage is equally memorable. Incidentally, if you run into some crazy Poles, two guys (Yoki & Radek) and one gal (Livia) are right on your heals via a BMW 650 Dakar and a Kawasaki 650 Versus. They spent the night the following Monday here with us. You should be able to tell them apart from your average travelers by their Polish plates.
    Be careful and keep up the good work!

    LaDue
    #55
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  16. Todd157k

    Todd157k Long timer

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,034
    Location:
    Ventura, CA
    Fun reading. Heading to the WWT in a few months with the family. RV there, bikes around WWT and Aches Nat'l Park.
    #56
  17. Bambooda

    Bambooda Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Oddometer:
    75
    Location:
    Toronto
    AHHH we're faling behind! So much to catch up on and so little time!!! :doh

    Chelsey here:

    Day 2 in Moab was our day to go exploring the intricate collection of off-road routes on the bikes. We started the day with Gemini Bridges road, which is one of the main roads that connects to the side trails near Canyonlands. The trail started off with a relatively steep gravel road with some loose potato sized stones in spots and as these large rocky patches were a new experience for me on the XT, I was pleasantly surprised to see just how well Xena could easily roll over these rocks. It was a beautiful road and was very scenic.

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    We also tried our wheels out on Bull Canyon trail which was a bit more challenging than Gemini Bridges, but was also a lot of fun. Xena started getting sleepy though and took a few naps in some spots with deep sand. :snore There were also much longer stretches of large loose rocks and a few steep step ups and step downs. We took a quick break to drink some water and take in the scenery.

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    The trail started getting a little tough so we continued back to Gemini. We then finally made it to the actual Gemini Bridges, and parked our bikes and hiked out to see them. They are twin bridges next to each other and arch over Bull canyon. It was a pretty spectacular view!

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    The second half of Gemini was much more tame and takes you out to the main highway that runs to Canyonlands. We started to do Horse Thief trail which is apparently very scenic but the first part of the road was quite boring and we were getting tired so we decided to call it quits. I would have to say that these trails were probably some of the most challenging that I’ve driven on Xena so far, but they were beautiful trails and the views were rewarding.

    To end off the day, we went into Arches for some sightseeing and sunset pictures. Our favourite arch was the Double arch and we were in awe of the size.

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    We made it to balancing rock just as the sun was setting and were treated to some beautiful views.

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    Day 3 in Moab was Jeff’s 25th birthday so we decided to rent a Jeep for the day and try not to break it. We started the day with a relatively easy drive just to warm up Jeff’s jeeping skills and took potash road to the Shaffer switchbacks which Jeff had ridden as part of the white rim trail, but I was excited to do the drive as well. We stopped for a photo op on potash road at the place where they launch the car into the canyon in Thelma and Louise.

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    We could see why they picked that location – very beautiful. We then continued on to the Shaffer switchbacks and surprisingly, Jeff seemed skittish driving 4 wheels by the cliffs considering he had just done it on 2.

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    We then did Gemini Bridges road and Bull canyon in the opposite direction – way more bumps and much less comfortable in a Jeep! I was gripping my “oh shit” bar for dear life for the majority of the trail.

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    Once we had done a couple easier routes, we decided to do the Klondike Bluffs trail which was ranked the most difficult ranking in the trail map the rental place provided us. Sounds fun! There was a lot of rock climbing on the slickrock and the path was less defined in some spots but Jeff seemed to be having a blast. I don’t think I let go of my “oh shit” bar the whole ride.

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    The trail also showcased some real-life dinosaur footprints which I obviously stopped to take pictures of, because as I’ve said before, dinosaurs are always cool. :nod

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    Once we made it to the top, we had a choice to turn around and go back the way we came, or take a more difficult trail called Baby Steps (for good reason) which leads into the back of Arches National Park. Naturally we took the more difficult trail. It was not long, but man was it steep and rocky!!! I willingly got out of the car to “take pictures” but really, I just wanted to avoid whiplash.

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    Once we were safely inside Arches, we took the dirt road through the park back to the highway rather than driving on the paved road through the park. It was a really stunning drive and there were a few hidden arches that the majority of people don’t get the opportunity to see.

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    At about 4:30 in the afternoon, we filled ‘er up with gas and took the jeep back to the rental place. We didn’t stop for lunch (devoured some Cliff bars en-route) so with the jeep on the trails for a full 8 hours we were satisfied that we got our money’s worth. Happy Birthday Jeff!

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    Day 4 in Moab was a slow start – I did a load of MUCH needed laundry and Jeff changed his back tire. We then said goodbye to Moab and drove to the Needles district of Canyonlands to do a couple short hikes (sun was too hot for any long ones!). We did the Pothole Point trail, which was slickrock that had developed small craters or “potholes” that would teem with life after a rainfall. Lucky for us, it had rained the night before and we got to see the creepy crawlies thriving in their personal potholes.

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    We also drove to the main Big Spring Canyon overlook and were treated to some lovely views of the Canyonlands.

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    We stayed in the mountains for the night near Monticello, and headed out the next morning for Colorado and some colder weather!
    #57
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  18. EBuck89

    EBuck89 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2014
    Oddometer:
    418
    Location:
    Mansfield , OHIO
    Looks like a great time ! We finished up the white rim trail today at the end of our continental divide ride trip and are now sadly headed back home to Ohio ... Good luck ! Awesome pictures .
    #58
  19. Marc LaDue

    Marc LaDue Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    392
    Location:
    Hancock Township, Plymouth County, Iowa
    Glad you both got to see the Shaeffer Switchbacks; I forgot they were part of the WRT, as we turned off to the left at the bottom. Colorado should be cooler, much like Yellowstone. Hope all continues to be well for you two honorary NUTS!

    LaDue
    #59
  20. Foiler

    Foiler Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2015
    Oddometer:
    62
    Location:
    AZ
    You should at least check out Sedona while in AZ. You could take the 89 south through Sedona to I 17 then hit general crook trail up, head south on the 87 for a few miles to FR 300 across the rim and then out through eastern AZ and the white mountains in NM.
    #60