Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. ROUNDSTOCK

    ROUNDSTOCK Been here awhile

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    I do some side work that involves chopping about an inch off of a subaru steel oil pan and then weld a 1/8 plate back on for offroad cars,I usually use ER-70-6 but have seen silicone bronze used, what do you suggest?The er-70-6 takes more talent and fitment ,but the silicone bronze is faster but looks cheap.....Steve
  2. MikeyT

    MikeyT Krusty Olde Pharteâ„¢

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  3. hayduke357

    hayduke357 hayduke357

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    I have a ready welder works off car batties, it has worked well for the offroad stuff, but i was wondering if i could set up my old cj5 with a 24v set up and just step down the rest of the stuff like the guages that work and the lights. what ya think? then i could just leave the jeep running while welding and not have to worry about power drop? That is once i have some money just saying.
  4. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    The ER70S-6 is classified as a mild steel wire with 70,000 pounds per square inch of tensile strength. Silicon bronze wire has much less tensile strength. The good thing about Silicone Bronze welding wire (SiBr) is that it is great for arc brazing very thin sheet metal. It is very forgiving since you actually braze the metal together rather than melting the parent metal. Typically I see a lot of MIG welding with Silicon Bronze filler wire in situations where you are welding two sheets of mild steel that are less than 1.2mm thick. Since it is forgiving you can get away with not burning through the parent sheet metal.

    And for the downside. Silicon bronze wire's strength comes from having a large surface area of the weld to gain it's strength. Since the tensile strength of a SiBr weld is say 1/10 the strength of steel you would need a 10X size weld. So you don't see alot of use of silicon Bronze weld wires for heavy or thick material. For a gas tank or other cosmetic application it works great. I would not use it to fix my kids swing set or build a skyscraper if you know what i mean.
  5. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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  6. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    Wait a few weeks and the 300 Amp version will be out in the market. That will be the one to get. It will have all of the features of the 205T but will go to 350 amps.:evil
  7. perrybwell

    perrybwell Hit it

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    i'm thinking about welding some plate steel on my factory pegs,after taking the rubber part off of course.Oh yeah i own a klr 650 so if anyone knows what i should do that would be great
  8. openboatt

    openboatt Don't harsh my mellow

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  9. gsweave

    gsweave Yinz, blinkers are on, since 05

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    Hey, at home I just use a lincoln stick welder. Nice cheapsetup. Will do just about everything. Including Alum with practice.

    But I use stick at work often on lots of crazy shit so, it doesn't bother me.


    Many feel mig is easier.:loco
  10. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    I was shortening my centerstand, and after grinding off the paint for about a inch around the area I was going to weld, and then wiping it down with Laquer thinner for good measure, I was having trouble TIG welding it. The puddle seemed to occasionally bubble and spark. I was using ER70S-2 welding rod, a Weldcraft WP-20 torch, 13N09 cup, a 1/16" Lanthanated tungsten, 15 CFH of Argon, a Thermal-Arc 185TSW set for 100A max current, DCEN and foot pedal control. Test welds on 1/8" mild steel seemed to be fine. It would seem like some kind of contamination but I don't know from what. Any clues as to what I was doing wrong?
  11. KLboxeR

    KLboxeR Back in the game again

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    Did you have a hole somewhere to vent gasses? (I'm assuming it was a tubular part you were welding) Is there water trapped in the part causing steam to contaminate? Did you clean the inside of the tubing (If it is tubing)

    Other suggestions would be to raise or lower the AR flow. Too high may be causing turbulence and allowing contamination or too low cfh will cause obvious problems. Did you try re-grinding the electrode in case it's been contaminated?

    That's what jumps to mind anyhow.
    Chris
  12. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    Thanks for the quick feedback. There shouldn't be water in the tubing. They were never wet and I saw no sign of rust. I did sand the area near the weld on the inside of the tubing, but not real thoroughly. I also wiped it down with laquer thinner to remove any traces of cutting oil (though there could have been some deep down in the tube that I couldn't get to. I did try regrinding the electrode a couple of times because the splatter was definitely contaminating it. I didn't have a vent hole, but the problem showed up before the weld was even close to being complete.

    When I did practice welds on some steel tubing I bought to practive on, they were much better than the ones on the center stand, so it seems more likely contamination, than gas flow issues, but I'll tinker with that next time I am having trouble.

    It is typical to drill a hole in tubing assemblies and weld it shut at the end of the welding process? I didn't see any sign of this on the centerstand as it was orginally built with the tubes all sealed.
  13. KLboxeR

    KLboxeR Back in the game again

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    Yes, it is typical to drill a small vent hole then tack it shut and grind to finish. You probably wouldn't see it on a factory assembly because they finish it off or robotics and such may preclude the need. If the part fit-up is really good, you may have enough of a seal to cause problems right from the start. Condensed water could be present in the part even though it was sealed frm new. I might cut it again and do a more thorough cleaning internally. If you still have trouble, try it with stick or MIG because part of the problem could be the inability to back purge the weld with Ar for the TIG weld.

    Chris
  14. KLboxeR

    KLboxeR Back in the game again

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    Might want to double check cup size, electrode extension and ground while you're at it. Make sure you're not picking up contaminants from the wheel yuo're using to grind the electrode as well.......just some other thoughts.

    Chris
  15. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    Thanks for your ideas.

    My electrode extension is about .25".

    The cup size is about 3/8" diameter. I used a fairly small one because I had some fairly tight places to get into because the tubes met at an angle less than 90 degrees.

    I checked my ground connection with an ohm meter because I was concerned about it, before I started welding and measured it <0.1 ohms.

    I have been using the side of the grinding wheel to sharpen the electrode (to avoid contamination and to get straight scratches along the length of the rod) and then clean it off with 320 grit Silicon Carbide paper. I have not heard of using sandpaper on electrodes, but I could not justify a dedicated diamond wheel for the small amount of welding I do.
  16. LoFlow

    LoFlow Been here awhile

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    Are you Just rewelding the foot on or welding the tubes together? If welding the tubes together I always make a small sleeve to go between the tubes. That gives your joint a good weld backing.

    As KL says drill a small hole in the bottom of the foot to let the gases out. You will be surprised the differance that will make. Sometimes I get lazy and don't and I always regret it. Also if you get a stubborn porosity hole you can try a little stainless rod for that spot on a non critical joint. bye
  17. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    The joint is between the vertical tubes and the U shaped tube. I tested it on the bike, and in spite of the crummy welds it seems secure enough, with lots of bouncing and rocking etc. I guess the welds are not that highly stressed because of the geometry.

    In the process of getting the tubes to fit, I ground away enough material so I needed to add the 1/4" feet on the bottom to get the length right.
    [​IMG]

    Thanks for the help, I am sure I will be asking more questions on my next welding project.
  18. crooked roads

    crooked roads I'm back

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    What is aluminum type/alloy used in most casted bike parts???? Suzuki, honda.....
  19. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    Try using a gas flow rate of 25CFH of 100% Argon. Porosity is usually caused by contaminants like paint, oils, or water. Or your shielding gas is not protecting the molten metal.

    Turn off any fans in the room and keep drafts away from where you are welding. Sometimes a gas regulator will give you a false reading. I would recommend a flow meter with the ball indicator for the best accuracy in gas regulation. Or if you are in doubt turn your gas flow up. Just be carefull not to crank up the flow rate too high or it will stir up the air around the weld and that will cause porosity problems also.
  20. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    It depends on the part and the casting process that is used. If it is sand cast, or diecast, etc.

    One thing for sure most cast aluminum parts have a tendency to have many pores throughout the microstructure. These pores tend to show themselves when you remelt the casting and the pores bubble out of the weld depending on the density of the casting.

    In most cases cast aluminum will be more difficult to weld then an extruded or solid billet of aluminum. If the casting can be welded you can use a 4043 or 5356 series aluminum filler metal.

    Here is a great book on Aluminum welding

    http://content.lincolnelectric.com/pdfs/products/literature/c8100.pdf