Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    5356 has a higher tensile strength than 4043.

    Use 5356.
  2. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    Nice job!
  3. djborden

    djborden Been here awhile

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    No shit... Nice work man!
  4. Epictetus70

    Epictetus70 Been here awhile

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    This thread is simply AWESOME.....thank you all you have knowledge in this area and willing to share it with those unfamiliar such as myself.

    Yet another reason why ADV rider forum kicks A$$!! :clap
  5. LexLeroy

    LexLeroy Chief Mansplainer

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    I don't know squat about MIG or TIG welding - just bought my first TIG outfit and haven't yet struck an arc. Here's a pic, however, of the output-side gauge of the Victor AF210-580 flow meter that came with the welder.

    [​IMG]

    Note that it's marked with an orifice size, in this case .032 of an inch. I did some reading after I opened the box and found a dual-gauge regulator rather than the expected floating-ball type of flow meter. Seems that the orifice size is paired with gas type to give a certain flow at a given pressure. Where's the orifice? With this regulator it appears to be in the outlet fitting, but your's might be different.

    David R's advice sounds pretty good to me - fiddle with it until you get decent welds and call it a day.

    But again, take what I'm saying with a grain of salt 'cause I don't even rate as a n00b at this point.
  6. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Lexleroy, Everyday you own a new tig welder and do not use it is a sin.

    I like your regulator. It must be made by a company that sells gas.

    I use 15 cfh for mig or tig and usually its plenty. There are times I use more like with Aluminum tig. Other times I Can use less especially with a 3/8 (#6) gas cup mig or tig.

    This does not make me right. My Harris Flow regulator with a ball and glass says its calibrated for a .050" orifice. No need to ever change it or even see it. As long as you get the proper amount of shielding.

    My first Mig was a Lincoln SP100 in about 1985. It came with a fixed 35 cfh regulator. I burned through an 80 cf bottle in the first day. I exchanged the regulator for an adjustable one when I got the tank filled. I still have that regulator.

    Enjoy your machine. I want to see pictures of your welds.

    David
  7. LexLeroy

    LexLeroy Chief Mansplainer

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    Tell me about it. I'm holding the new TIG, a Thermal Arc 185 Arcmaster, over my own head as an incentive to finish the bicycle that I started for my daughter. I'm down to the final braze-ons and bridges between the stays, but I got distracted this summer with my dirt bike. The poor V-Strom also suffered some serious neglect as well.

    Here's the daughter's bike so far - brass fillet brazing for some of the lugs and then silver brazing the lugs to the tubes. The thing behind the bike is the frame fixture that I built to hold all of the pieces together for pinning and brazing.

    [​IMG]

    And here's two of the home-made fillet brazed lugs, shown with a production investment cast lug, prior to being silver brazed into the bike.

    [​IMG]

    Brazing with oxy-fuel is fun but I'm pretty stoked about learning TIG... looking forward to lots more conversations in this thread.
  8. NitroAcres

    NitroAcres MotoBiggots Suck

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    BeerCap shown only for size relationship....:lol3
  9. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    LexLeroy, those are some beautiful had made parts.

    Nitro Acres, nice welds. I got no rhythm......

    My son and I have a job shop. We tig as much as we can.

    David
  10. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    So you remember those oxy-fuel cylinders I came across a couple months ago? Yeah- I also scored two sets of portables, cheap.

    I hae been an oxy-acetylene cutting FOOL over the last month. Trying to figure out brazing now- I blew through an oilpan I was trying to braze a fitting onto. I think I should have used a welding tip, not the cutting head (duh!). To my credit, I didn't activate the cutting jet.

    I still have to go get the big bottles filled. That's going to be a pain in the ass- local shops won't fill them if you don't have a pickup bed to put them in.

    Did the gent that was trying to use a pressure reg on a Lincoln 3200HD ever get the code broken on settings and such? I would like to give gas-MIG another shot.
  11. DiabloADV

    DiabloADV Semi-Occasional

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    I've got a Hobart 110v wire feed welder (with gas). I'm looking to weld up some exhaust pipes. I am NOT a highly skilled welder.

    I'm looking for technique tips on welding mild steel pipes together. I found this YouTube vid that seems to make a lot of sense to me, at my skill level. Rather than try to lay a bead, the guy makes a series of tack welds around the tube. This strikes me as a way to really control what I'm doing.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_v_6jsUDOsc&feature=related

    Thoughts on this approach? Better suggestions...?
  12. LexLeroy

    LexLeroy Chief Mansplainer

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    Flux is your friend. When it turns glassy w/ no bubbles then it's hot enough to melt the filler metal - too much heat and you roach your flux. Use a flux that wets out at the right temp for your filler. For bronze or nickel silver I use Gasflux type "B" - similar to Harris #17 (that blue paste stuff).
  13. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    A true tack weld is made to break off if needed or hold things in position to be welded.

    A series of tacks would be a series of welds made to break off.

    I weld exhaust with an SP100 turned down C 3 .
    I start at the top and make my way down. One pass each side.
    Make a dry pass to see where the gun will fit if its on the car.

    David
  14. fxstbiluigi

    fxstbiluigi crash test dummy

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    David:
    A 'tack' also needs to be strong enough to hold the parts in alignment and withstand the pressure of coaxing the rest of the weldment into alignment. And withstand the stresses of welding once the fit-up is complete.
  15. DiabloADV

    DiabloADV Semi-Occasional

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    What I mean is to use a series of short welds rather than a long bead.
  16. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    This will work fine, it's how I built the exhaust on my Jeep. Butt-welded tubes and short tacks. It's been bounced off of rocks and, while the tube has been squashed in areas, the welds have NOT failed.

    Sent from my MB886 using Xparent Green Tapatalk 2
  17. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    What I am trying to say is learn the machine. Set it so you can run a bead. It is the right welder for the job. .023 ER70S-6 wire and c/25 gas. I do a lot of exhaust.
    If its too hot and you continually have to stop then turn the machine down. If you are almost blowing through then the heat is right.

    Have fun and enjoy the machine.

    Sent from the phone in my shoe. Maxwell Smart.
  18. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    eh, don't confuse the two. You tack pieces together and give them a smack, maybe too. But a third or fourth time or too much movement and your pieces are going to be laying on the ground.

    In other words, tacks hold together only when subjected to a small force. And when the gap isn't right, the fitter will simply break the tack and have the welder start over.
  19. larryboy

    larryboy Chopper Rider

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    It's fine for exhaust, don't weld a roll cage like that or anything your life depends on. We call that WyoWelding(Wyotech teaches that and it's technically wrong), the weakest part of a weld is the start when it's the coldest and that technique gives you a full weld of cold starts...wrong, but fine for exhaust.
  20. NitroAcres

    NitroAcres MotoBiggots Suck

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    If a Tack was a Weld, it wouldn't be called a Tack....Tacks are to hold stuff together till you Weld it....a bunch of tacks stacked ontop of each other is Not a Weld.
    :norton