Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. kirkster70

    kirkster70 moto junkie

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    Benesesso, thank you very much for taking the time to write that up. I learn something new every time I visit the garage forum.

    I'm sitting here with "How it's Made" running in the background. They are tempering shovels in an oven while I am trying to glean some knowledge from your post. Pretty awesome! :clap

    No wonder I can't stay off this site. :D I might even have to print that out and hang it on the garage 'fridge!
  2. Benesesso

    Benesesso Long timer

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    Holy cow, You were on Elmer's crew? My hat is off to you. Never met him, but wanted to.

    What are you doing now?
  3. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I was taught to make another pass when welding hardened steel and cast iron to add heat and slow cooling.

    This helps prove why trigger mig welding or consecutive tacks is a poor method.

    David

    Sent from the phone in my shoe. Maxwell Smart.
  4. NitroAcres

    NitroAcres MotoBiggots Suck

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    Same thing as always, fabricating and TIG Welding...That's how I got to be friends with ET, I did alot of work with him and other Fuel guys...some days I miss it, but I stay connected thru Chris Hand (the bike above).
    Elmer was a good Friend and Mentor.

    You and Warren Johnson (NHRA ProStock Car) could carry on a very interesting conversation, he is probably the smartest hands on guy I have ever met when it comes to metals and properties of them...but he also knows when it just takes a sawzall and a welder..:lol3
  5. LexLeroy

    LexLeroy Chief Mansplainer

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    Maybe I'm reading too much into your past few posts, but might this be why some of the sidecar chassis guys use DOM (Drawn Over Mandrel) mild steel tubing rather than chromo for the sidecar subframe and chassis, cost and ease of bending aside - weldability? If that's the case then I have a new-found respect for good old-fashioned mild steel tubing.
  6. Benesesso

    Benesesso Long timer

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    I don't think weldability is much of a factor there. I think it's just $$$$, and the builders aren't too concerned with what it ends up weighing.

    You won't find much mild steel in aircraft, and none at all in rockets.
  7. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

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    DOM is plenty strong enough for the size tubing they use, you have to remember that weight in the side car is not a bad thing.
  8. ridepjride

    ridepjride Migrant

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    Bolt backed out of the rear sprocket and gouged the swingarm. For a proper repair, can this be built up by welding?

    [​IMG]
  9. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Sure, drop it off. :rofl

    Yes it can be welded. Not a problem.

    David

    Edit:
    I have posted pictures of broken bolts. This one was a little tougher.

    88 Suzuki 600 broken exhaust bolt. I welded a few nuts to it with the SP-100 one of the first Lincoln 110 Volt Mig welders.

    No joy, they kept twisting off.

    Today we attached the front wheel to the fork lift and picked the bike up. I used a tig torch and some 316 stainless filler.

    I welded quite a few nuts to the stud before it finally came out. No pics of the bike. It had no body panels or tank on it.

    [​IMG]

    These are far from all the failures, they are all over the floor.

    David
  10. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

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    Were you using a breaker bar or ratchet to turn those nuts? I've found that a T-bar is the way to go when trying to apply torque out near the end of a protruding stud.

    A T-bar doesn't put any bending force into the stud, only torsion. In the situation of turning a nut that's welded-on out at the end of a stud, a ratchet or breaker bar applies both bending and torsion forces. That dual-direction force results in a break similar to how a tube of Pillsbury biscuits breaks open.

    By related analogy, a tire can 100% turn, or 100% stop, but not at the same time.


    <BR>
  11. warewolf

    warewolf Tyre critic

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    Gotta subscribe to this thread so I don't lose it!

    Did my first welding the other day. Spent three hours watching youtube instructional vids amidst another three hours of practising. :lol3
  12. Megadeus

    Megadeus Motorcycles are therapy

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    I'm futzing my way through fabricating a few parts for my sidecar project and I have a question for the masses.

    When butt welding two 3/4" steel rods end to end, do you grind a flat taper on each end to be welded? Or would you grind a conical taper ?

    I can see the ease of welding into a flat tapered void versus a conical. Just pondering the difference.
  13. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Chisel point is easier. after the first weld double check straight. When done and its still hot, check for straight again.

    David
  14. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    I'm far from an experienced welder but I did this for a buddy of mine on a DRZ

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  15. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    The Kiwi summer weather has been pretty good for sheltering in the shed & abusing some metal aye? What sort of machine have you got?

    I've just been busy TIGging together some pannier racks for Nic's XT, tube is a bit fiddly but it's coming out ok for a learner. Not super pretty but I couldn't break my test welds so I must be doing something right.

    [​IMG]

    This is 5/8 dia .065 wall 4130, the larger dia bits are just black pipe.

    [​IMG]

    Lots to work on in terms of technique I know, but for my first serious tube welding project I'm fairly happy with 'strong & looks ok from a distance' :lol3

    Cheers
    Clint
  16. ridepjride

    ridepjride Migrant

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    nice work
  17. mikejohn

    mikejohn Long timer

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    Hoping to get a house with a garage this summer, Which Tig welder is good for home use, looking to weld aluminum , 4130 steet and so on, mostly bike related stuff, I'll get a stick welder for mild steel
  18. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    To tig aluminum you need AC. Mild steel and alloys need DC. Most any DC welder will tig.

    get as big as you can afford. :)

    David
  19. warewolf

    warewolf Tyre critic

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    I did it quite a few weeks ago, I needed to repair my trailer once I got the 200 fixed in order to take it out. If I had a spare minute I'd be happier riding not sheltering no matter the weather. Here it's been quite hot and extended dry so some forests are closed due to drought-induced fire risk.

    Borrowed innathyzit's arc welder to start, but both he and Topo also offered Tig. I think I need Topo's fancy helmet or a different glass, as I just couldn't see where I was aiming to start. Main project next year is to rebuild my trailer, but I do have a couple of little jobs to do on the 640, such as pannier rails like yours.
  20. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    Unless you have a 3phase power supply, its probably better to be looking at an inverter type 240v AC/DC set. I would suggest 200 amp if you want to work with aluminum, and while a Chinese set will probably be fine for occasional use, its worth paying more for a name brand if you are looking at anything other than occasional use. Remember you will also need argon gas, and that using CK "gas saver" front end torch parts, will mean you use quite a lot less gas.