Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. Rd650

    Rd650 Been here awhile

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    Use my little mig 95% of the time, but have the option of arc (stick) with this old dog if need be,
    [​IMG]
  2. Longboardr

    Longboardr Been here awhile

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    south central PA
    I've got not exactly a welding question but you should be the right group of guys to ask.

    I'm looking for a portable rig I can use for those times when I'm in the middle of tearing something down and need to get a fastener red hot. Taking a motorcycle to work's oxy/act rig isn't always feasible when it's half torn down and getting the resulting broken off bolts out has not a bit of fun.

    Is a portable oxy/acetylene rig the most sensible choice? Recommendations for a red hot rig?
  3. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

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    Why not a MAPP gas torch?
  4. dorkpunch

    dorkpunch Oops...

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    My 1/8" plate is now about an inch thick... :lol3 Getting better. I think if I had a smooth surface to start with my beads might actually look half decent. As it is, I get a nice puddle going and then hit a hole and muck it up. Stupid chunk of metal takes forever to get hot enough to carry a puddle and then I can get 2 or maybe 3 passes in before it's too hot. Think I'm to the point now that if I had a pedal I could do a lot better job... any suggestions for me? Hows it lookin?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  5. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I suggest you visit a scrap yard and find some more aluminum.

    Looking good, Keep it up.

    David
  6. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    I had a similar problem, my 4x4 building has gotten to the point where I had to have the ability to quickly remove stuck or stripped fasteners. I kept an eye out on craigslist and found a portable oxy/acetylene torch for 50 bones.

    Something you may want to consider: oxy/propane. You will be able to use the same torch and will be able to get fuel gas easily at any place that sells propane for bbq grills. You won't be able to weld with it, but it actually cuts faster than acetylene and is much safer to store in a residential setting.

    With very little practice you will be able to heat to red hot, and if necessary, 'wash away' the bits of steel you don't want. I have actually saved a few bolts by washing off the stuck nut without damage to the threads.



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  7. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Once you get the hang of it, you can weld, braze or cut with the torches. All you need are the proper tips. My first welder was a set of "Metal Master" torches. I used them until I bought an engine drive.

    Its by far the best way to learn to weld. Once you master torch welding, stick and tig are easy.

    Torches new cost me about $300 plus tank rental or purhase depending on your gas supplier. Things can be had much cheaper from harbor freight or tractor supply. I think both even sell tanks.

    30 years later I am still using those torches.

    David
  8. Pablo83

    Pablo83 Sleep, Wrench, Ride

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    Considering the surface you're working on and that you don't have a pedal, it looks great. I don't see any grease smudges on your work either; did you find a new pair of gloves?

    My scrap guy came recently and cleaned me out. Otherwise I would mail you some more pieces to work on. Hopefully I'll be building an alu skidplate today, maybe I'll have some decent scrap left over...
  9. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    Question for the oxy-acetylene folks: How often should I be taking my torch in to have the o-rings serviced/replaced? Its a Victor set and is only used sporadically for home/hobby use for cutting and heating.

    TIA
  10. kioti

    kioti Cruzinonline

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    Most likely never unless they cause a problem, I bought my first set of Victor Journeymans in 1982 and they are used daily in the shop and have never had the need for servicing.
  11. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    Why would you take them in? Buy replacement orings of the proper sort and do them yourself. It's not rocket science

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  12. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    I have a set from the 1960s, rarely used, and it still has the original o-rings.
  13. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    Thanks all. I guess they will last a good long while. I had read somewhere on the usegroup/newsgroup I hung out on to self-teach myself welding & cutting that it was a prudent thing to do. And I am a little paranoid about OA after some of the stories posted by pros on that group.
  14. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    I can certainly understand your cocerns- look back a few pages and you will see that I had same concerns myself a few back.

    Replacement of the rings is not a bad idea as if they are bad you can get a flashback through the torch body. But other than the rings there isn't much else involved in a torch. Get the proper orings and install them yourself. Honestly it is easy. Not to be blunt, but if you can't handle replacing few orings you are probably gonna want to leave the oxy-fuel torch alone. ;-)
    Oh yeah- install flashback arrestors, at least at the regulator.

    I started with o-a a few months ago, bought a training dvd at Northern Tool for 30 bones.. VERY helpful and I recommend this highly!

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  15. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    So I'm about to make some new stronger pannier rails & a rear rack for the 640, will use 5/8 4130 tubing. First thing will be to machine up some mounting bushes from solid bar.

    Now, I'm probably overthinking this but...:norton the local steel store has 4140 I could use (& the few scraps needed won't cost much), or I have some plain mild steel on hand. Am I likely to get an appreciably stronger joint with the 4140 to 4130 (will TIG weld & post heat treat with the MAP torch if required) or is there not much in it?

    Cheers
    Clint
  16. Pilbara

    Pilbara In the flow...

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    I have searched Lincoln site and googled but cannot locate a wiring diagram for a Lincoln Weldanpower 300+ engine driven welder using a Kubota engine. Code is 1316. Model is WP300+. Made in Australia by the looks of it. Any leads appreciated
    Cheers
    Pilbara
  17. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    This is for your code # kabota engine pipeliner 200.

    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/assets/servicenavigator-public/lincoln3/im844.pdf

    not sure if this is it, code #s have 5 digits.

    David
  18. overlandr

    overlandr Dystopist

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    I have some shipping containers used for storage and need to weld on some steel lock boxes to protect the padlocks from everything but cutter grinders.

    There is a single phase power supply 240vac up to 13amps available. I would like to consider purchasing my own welder to weld these boxes onto the containers as the cost of getting a contractor to do it would mean if I do it myself, I'll save and get to keep the welder for other jobs.

    What welder would be suitable for this job?
  19. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    How thick is the steel?

    Do the math, 13 amps @ 220 volts = 2860 watts

    Stick Welding at 35 volts, you will have 81 amps not counting 25% loss in efficiency.

    I weld 3/32 7018 at 85 amps DC. Not quite enough there.

    Mig welding at 18.6 volts you have 150 amps available using c/25. still not counting loss.

    Does this help?
  20. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    I am going to have to offer my non-professional opinion, born of experience here:

    A 120vac MIG is more than up to the job for welding lock boxes to connex-container steel doors.

    I built three jeeps I have beat the hell out of with my Lincoln 3200HD, welding from 1/16" high-tensile steel sheet (jeep Cherokee monocoque) to 1/4" structural sub frames and OEM chassis (S10 solid axle swap, bumpers and axle bracketry). I have had no problems at all using (flux core E71T-GS) and (ER70S-6 with CO2).

    Metallurgically speaking, I am sure this is likely not optimum, but I have never had a problem with these builds and have winched many times without problems, several hard pulls.

    Also, used a Lincoln AC225 for some parts of these builds, using 6013, but those welds are by far in the minority since I don't have ready access to 220vac.

    Since the OP is new to this and just wants to get a task done and then play with/learn a skill, I would lean toward the stick machine and look for one used on craigslist. I paid $125 for my AC225. Recommend staying away from the Harbor Freight welders as they can be hit/miss.

    Also, since presumably the OP doesn't have the ability to do these welds in flat position, I suspect the hardest part will be dealing with the out-of-position nature of this welding task. I think I would run them uphill to keep the slag out of the joint, and clean well with a grinder first. Probably not strictly necessary owing to the rod selected, but you can never clean a weldment too well before burning in.

    My experience, and again I am not a professional welder but I have actually welded onto this material at work with the MIG mentioned above.

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