Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. Pablo83

    Pablo83 Sleep, Wrench, Ride

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    I would suggest you think about what types of projects are in your future and if they're mostly steel, go with MIG; if they're mostly Alu, go with TIG. If you don't have any TIG experience and you buy a TIG machine to do all your steel and alu projects, you are looking at a steep learning curve that might really inhibit your ability to complete projects.
  2. Pike Bishop

    Pike Bishop Pull Down the Ponzi.

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    The nice thing about many or most TIG machines is that you can also stick weld with them, so you effectively get two machines in one.

    If you want to weld aluminum with a TIG, be sure to get one with AC.
  3. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    man, I'm late to the game, but they did make and I have run into 7" pipe.

    We were able to special order a hunk and a fitting. It was about 10 years ago. If I can remember it was schedule 40 and was normal wall thickness, so 7 5/8" OD?
  4. xcflyn

    xcflyn Long timer

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    You thief ! You did steal that. Those big pigs will be around for another 60 years still running. Great deal !
    Now you can weld up some fenders for that trailer :rofl
  5. redprimo

    redprimo Been here awhile

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    that trailer belongs to my neighbor and it seems like every time I borrow it I have to repair the lights. This time I repaired one of his chainsaws in exchange for using the trailer. I've got two more saws to go.
  6. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    Sounds like a good first project : strengthen the light mounts!

    Sent from my MB886 using Xparent Green Tapatalk 2
  7. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    Folks- had this all banged out on weldtalk, but they suddenly seem to want to moderate. :shrugs:...

    I need a utility wagon, mainly to move my engine hoist and other heavy/unwieldly shit from the garage to the back shed- BUT, will also need to transport a 600+ pound engine back there at some point as well.

    Looking to go about 18"X36" for the loadbed, wheels directly under the assembly (ie: the widest point is the loadbed).

    I have a good bit of scrap 2X2X1/8" wall tubing as well as angle and such, from past 4X4 suspension and bumper builds. I have no problems or questions re the building of the frame...

    What has me flumoxed is the steering, and appropriate axle for the fixed and steering axles.

    Basically, want this: http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/wagon-made-from-scrap-steel.html

    It looks like he used solid rod for the fixed axle, and steering knuckles for the steering bit. I don't think the solid rod is up to this sort of stress unless I go larger diameter. I do, however, think that welding grade-8 bolts to the frame itself would work just fine. Yes, they will loose some strength from the heat and welding- in that case, second thought I could through-bolt through the frame (dropping the frame down another few inches to allow this, of course), leaving enough length on the bolt to properly affix my wheels (which will have bearing-equipped hubs). So I don't think the rear axle is such a big deal- anything I am missing here?

    The front axle, though: I am flumoxed. I have no idea where to obtain the steering knuckles. I could make the entire front assembly pivot, but this seems like it would be a weak point of the structure, and would make the cart more tippy. I don't want "Radio Flyer" single-pivot wagon steering, looking for something more like a solid-axle equipped truck's steering (ie, the pivots are at each wheel, a la "kingpins" on a Dana axle).

    I realize box-section tubing is overkill on this project. I will use expanded steel for the load deck, or perhaps wood if consensus says this would be better. I am using box section because I have a lot of it that's going to rust if it's not used, so this is a $0 supply. I can buy the wheels if I have to, for $10 per- but I already have a source lined up for wheels off an old commercial lawnmower, at $0.

    Costs for the project looks like a bit of hardware (which I probably already have from previous projects- I have a 200-pound case of misc stainless and zinc fasteners), some paint, and whatever the solution ends up being for the load deck and steering.

    Could use your input!

    EDIT: I realize the box section will make this thing HEAVY, that is fine. I have some clevises I plan on welding to the frame for tiedown use as well as hoisting use. Hoisting, as in: to hoist it up into my trailed. I have a milsurp M101A1 trailer that I use behind my S-10 (itself highly modified- Dana 44 solid axles from an 82 Wagoneer are under it, about 12" lift all told), it is of course quite tall. I am modifying it for civvy voltage and 7-wire RV harness, and plan to delete the tiltbed feature and mount a pickup bed hoist in it to allow me to easily load axles, engines, etc. So there are no concerns of keeping this trailer light enough to get into the back of a SUV without throwing my back out. Any finished product under 150 pounds will be fine.
  8. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I have used nuts and bolts for hinges. They will seize from rust, otherwise it works.

    1/2" pipe and 1/2" bolts for king pins and spindles or tie rods.

    You could drill the threads out of a 3/4 nut and use a piece of round stock. Weld the nuts to the frame.

    Most nuts have zinc on them, don't breathe the white smoke.

    For the deck 11 gauge is plenty I use 10 gauge in small dump trucks. You can also use wood with a tubing subframe.

    The bigger the wheels, the easier it will pull or push.

    Looks like a fun project.

    David
  9. Bokrijder

    Bokrijder Soyez sans que peur

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    Jafco,

    In the old days, pickups (for that matter, autos also) used straight front axles - too wide, you can cut it down.

    I'd poke around old junk yards, older farm equipment dealers, etc. and see what I could track down. You'll find something which you can use - you'll discover something and have an "Ah-ha that's it !!" moment.

    Bokrijder
  10. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    An actual automotive axle is WAY overkill for this... first of all, the tires are only going to be about 13" diameter, and the whole thing will be 18" wide.

    I think I will probably end up going with the pipe and bolt, welded together. I am having trouble picturing what David is saying, though...
  11. Bokrijder

    Bokrijder Soyez sans que peur

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    Thought you were dealing with some weight issues. I'd still think about torching the kingpins off an old lightweight straight axle, if laden weight is a deal.

    Not the case - sounds like what you need is a Chinese made commercial garden wagon which can be picked up in my area for around a hundred bucks at Tractor Supply. Modify as required.

    (edit) Forgot that you want to use your stuff - then go look at the garden wagon. I was thrown off when you stated the box frame would be super duty, assumed that you wanted the weight carrying ability to be up to the frame standard. (edit)


    Bokrijder
  12. tenelson

    tenelson n00b

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    Has anyone ever tried to weld a Guzzi stainless steel fender? The fender for my 850T is cracked, and I'd like to weld. I have a Hobart MIG and 75/25 Argon/CO2 gas. Do I need to get a new spool of wire?
  13. redprimo

    redprimo Been here awhile

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    JAFO, you're over thinking things. 600lbs is only 150lbs/wheel and it looks like the cart in the link would handle that much. I think you could use a piece of 1/4" black pipe (house hold gas plumbing) for the kning pin and and weld a grade 5 or 8 bolt to it for the axle. that would let you connect the king pin to the knuckle by droping a bolt through the pipe.
  14. xcflyn

    xcflyn Long timer

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    I would tig weld it or find someone that can. If you mig that you will need correct wire and gas. If you plan to mig a lot of stainless in the future then maybe it is worth it to you ? For the record, I think with the right set up it will weld very nice and with a little grinding and buffing it can be as good as new. Others here may feel different- my .02
  15. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    i have never welded a stainless guzzi fender. I have done a few countertops. They suck. They warp.

    Tig would be the way to go. It may be easier for you to hire it out.

    If you want to do it, you need gas for stainless and stainless wire compatible with what ever your fender is made out of. There are many kinds of stainless. Does a magnet stick to it? Is it chrome plated?

    If you do it, measure the thickness of the fender and practice on something else the same.

    David
  16. ericrat

    ericrat Long timer

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    You can silver solder (braze) stainless. Real hard silver solder like a jewler uses, melting point over a 1000 degrees.
  17. Stan_R80/7

    Stan_R80/7 Beastly Gnarly

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    Per Miller/Hobart, the gas needed for mig welding stainless steel is a trimix described here: http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/tech_tips/MIG_tips/

    Stainless wire, compatible with the stainless of the fender is needed along with the trimix gas. Getting some familiarity with welding similar thickness stainless would be wise. However, stainless sheet is fairly expensive from sources such as McMaster-Carr. You can do the math, but after swapping out for a bottle of trimix, new wire, and buying stainless sheet of the right gauge to practice with it is likely that finding someone to TIG weld the fender is less expensive.

    I would get good (or decent) at welding stainless sheet before tackling a project such as the fender. Brazing the crack with Safety-Silv 56 is something I would be comfortable doing. Good luck!
  18. tenelson

    tenelson n00b

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    Thanks for the responses. I think it would be more economical to hire it out.
  19. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    Cheers Mate! After further research these really looked like the best value option to get a bigger window & good TIG performance. I ordered one from an NZ engineering supplies store, Machinery House, & got it yesterday. I had to drill some extra holes in the mask for the headband angle adjuster so it would sit right when flipped down but a few test welds last night left me very impressed otherwise. I'll have to think up another excuse for my crappy welding now :lol3

    Cheers
    Clint
  20. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    What is making these little splatters on my TIG welds?

    [​IMG]

    That is a 5/8" .049 wall 4130 tube on a 4140 bush, 1/16" tungsten, 1/16 ER70S-2 filler, about 10 l/min straight argon. I don't get it every weld:

    [​IMG]

    From my pannier rack build: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=865994

    I'm very much a n00b on the TIG & there's lots of things I know I can improve on like keeping a better torch position, balancing the heat better etc, but what it is that causes those splatters I don't know, & I want my welds to be purty dammit :D Any other general critique welcome too.

    Cheers
    Clint