Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    Yeah, we don't use 7018 here unless it's good, clean metal. In nukes it's all you'll use. Today I had to weld a pipe support from angle that was left outside for who knows long to metal that has been around since 1942.I used 6010, red rod, because that rod really blasts through the crud.

    You are getting it, though. Many people who have spent 5 days in a booth can't do as well as you.


    I haven't struck an arc in 2 months. Had to borrow a hood. No welding gloves, no welding jacket. I had a pair of sleeves in my bag from days gone by. And I had to do it in an ignorant position. You can work is very slow here. Not just because of what they're asking us to do, but because we're doing them.
  2. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    Ok, here's a camera phone pic of something I did last night, 3/32" 7018 at 100 amps. There's some undercutting on the vertical plate. Ignore the crappy vertical weld, that's from a few days ago, I keep cutting pieces up and welding them back together.

    I got a bit of 6011 and 6013 that I'll try when I get a chance.

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/tPUx0FYYwPeYk3BGVq_zye4BpFZPVMsAsIdfA-OyIm8?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-_bNOVSvsj5E/UaVs-E_NIwI/AAAAAAAAE98/u9dDBlV-WSU/s800/welding5.jpg.JPG" height="451" width="800" /></a>
  3. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    Undercut: the most common reason is your rod angle is incorrect and/or you're long arcing. If your rod angle is wrong you will melt the base metal but fail to deposit any metal in that area. You should try and vary your rod angle and pause for a bit, let the metal pile up behind the rod. remember, what's happening behind your rod, in the puddle, is most important. You need to look ahead so you keep your rod in the groove, but those are just glances. You really need to pay attention to what your puddle looks like.


    nice work!
  4. marc-s

    marc-s photographer

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    It's not a direct welding question, but as it will be my first welding project - that will come with lots of questions during the process - I migh just as well ask the question here: I'm planing to build a storage rack under the ceiling in my workshop. The workshop itself is very small and tight. The rack should accomodate standard size boxes with 200x300mm. Weight per box will be approx. 20kg (45lbs), the rack will have a length of 2.3m (7.5ft) and depth of 30cm (12inch / depth of one box). See the picture below (the angle bracket will be pointed upwards so I don't bang my head on it; ).

    [​IMG]

    My question: what type of steel (size, profile) do I need for a load of ~300kg/660lbs, and how many angle brackets are neccessary? One very two boxes? I generally like being on the safe side; call me a "prepper" when it comes to building my workshop. :D but as space is very limited I like using the smallest possible profile. And it also savfes me some cash (don't have a cheap supplier for such stuff near where I live).
  5. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I run 3/32 7018 at 85 amps DC + almost all the time in all positions. Higher amps and the rod stub is a red noodle when I stop welding.
  6. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Mark S. I would use 1.5" x 1.5" x 1/8" angle, three supports.
    I am not an engineer.
  7. Stan_R80/7

    Stan_R80/7 Beastly Gnarly

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    marc-s: I did some calculations for a milling machine table on rollers within the last year. The 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 1/8" steel angle David R suggested was what I used in the calculations. This size angle iron with a brace in the middle per your sketch should be more than adequate for 660 lb using ASTM A36 steel. Based on this table the weight is ~1.23 lb/ft, which should give a total weight ~ 30 lb dependent on the design: http://www.unionironworks.com/engineering_calculator_detail.aspx?x=wZWr%2FQqjPOQIKHS1NPaJgZR4dok4NMOr

    FWIW, my calculations on a 18"x36"x30"H cart showed the theoretical maximum static load was ~ 20000 lb. Factors of safety need to be included, which reduce the maximum by 1/4. Good luck!
  8. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    Ok, since you folks say you don't mind more and more pictures. . . . .

    Here's some more of the 7018, 3/32" rod, 90 amps AC, 1/4" steel being welded. I made one really bad restart in the middle.
    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/f8Pl2vNtHpyPZu-WIoMLstMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-BS5AaM7r92I/UaawcFeiEGI/AAAAAAAAE-k/czmW6ryzU4U/s640/P1020224.JPG" height="475" width="640" /></a>

    Tried out some of the new rod: 6013 3/32 at 70 amps is the pretty one, 6011 1/8" at 100 amps is the ugly one.
    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/QS-0P-Wc8O7698ZuGcTPNNMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4Gvu6tNXqXg/UaawYYHfKpI/AAAAAAAAE-U/Djc5tXeDbn8/s640/P1020227.JPG" height="555" width="640" /></a>

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/-woYIVtdS-mChiaDa9_w-tMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-e7ELjEOx5nQ/UaawaVejMXI/AAAAAAAAE-c/aX4mkBVx1JM/s640/P1020223.JPG" height="498" width="640" /></a>

    6013 was very easy to weld with. The 6011, I need some more practice- when they say "strong arc force", they aren't kidding. It felt like it was gouging out the steel, but I think part of that was the sound of it, and I would have been better off just moving slower. And maybe turning down the amps a bit.

    Thanks again everyone for the advice, I really like honing new skills. . . .
  9. marc-s

    marc-s photographer

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    thanks Stan for your input. In my calculations I already included 40% safety margin. I think I'll be able to put 11 boxes, 20kg each on that storage rack. Some of them might only contain sand paper or drill bits, others might be cramped full with electronic parts. 20kg + 40% per box seems a reasonable weight, but I'll weight the filled boxes today to be sure.

    Will I be able to do such calculations by myself, maybe with some free software? Or do I need a masters degree in rocket science to even understand all the variables that must be taken into account? I initially planed on an angle iron the size you suggested. But I wonder if I could downsize it, just to save some cash. And for the sake of downsizing.
  10. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    As a welder and NOT an engineer, I just over build everything.

    It works for me.

    David
  11. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Zak, Much better looking welds. :D
    Travel speed in more consistent.
    Toes are wet


    I don't use much 6010 or 6011. Its not the rod for me. This does not make it bad rod, I just started with 7018 and stayed with it for the last 40 years.

    Keep at it.
    David
  12. Stan_R80/7

    Stan_R80/7 Beastly Gnarly

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    I was looking at the 1-1/2" x 1/8" angle because it was available locally, was inexpensive, and fairly easy to weld. The calculations came after the availability, cost, and ease of welding. Check with your local suppliers - 30 lb (14 kg) of 7.5 ft (2.3 meter) angle iron will be expensive to ship. Also, here they sell angle iron in 20 ft (6 meter) sections - which is cost prohibitive for two pieces to ship. Using 1/16" (1.5mm) steel instead of 1/8" will work - the issues in my case were finding the material without paying 2x-3x the cost in shipping. Regarding calculations, buckling was a limitation on the cart (along with wheels). For a wall shelf, the limit will likely be the wall attachment and not the steel shelf. Good luck!
  13. marc-s

    marc-s photographer

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    availability and price is indeed an important factor that I'm taking into accout since the begining. Price is the main reason I'm asking about downsizing. I have one or two very good supplieres within a 20min drive. They have almost every size, but are too very expensive. Good if you only need some small piece, but if you need lots of tubing for welding projects you're better of getting the stuff somewhere else. and the "somewhere else" is what I'm looking for now. I guess I'll order the stuff in Germany, have it shipped to a pick up station near the border and then drive there to retrieve it. Some supplieres selling online sell 2m sections, which is okay for me. In Germany that is kind of the max. you can ship for a decent price with regular parcel services. So shipping costs will be very low compared to what I get.

    at least I got a welding machine today (loaned from a friend. It's a Megatronic Rally 166m. No idea if it's good though...
  14. mattlikesbikes

    mattlikesbikes Been here awhile

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    ***Probably not welding specifically, but maybe needed.***

    I am getting ready to make an adapter plate between my rear rack mounting points and my Hepco Becker Universal top case mount. The H&B traditionally uses bolts with larger washers to hold it down to an plate but I was thinking about drilling holes in the plate and tapping them.

    What is the minimum thickness on aluminum and steel plates to get a decent tap? Alternatively is there an easy way to tack a nut to the underside of a thinner piece?

    I've only ever coat hanger brazed as a kid, but it seems like a stick welder would be good enough to tack a couple bolts to a sheet of 3/16 steel. How about JB weld?
  15. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Is the top plate aluminum?

    Rule of thumb, a nut needs to have as much threads as the diameter of the bolt. SO a 10mm bolt needs a nut (or tapped hole) 10mm thick. In aluminum I would double that.

    Helicoils in aluminum hold better than just tapping the aluminum.

    David
  16. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    Yes, a stick welder would be finely suited for zapping some nuts on the backside of your steel plate so that you can thread your bolts into without having a hold back.

    Do tack everything in place, though. If you're off a little bit when you tack those nuts you'll hate yourself.
  17. Hastelloy-X

    Hastelloy-X Been here awhile

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    3 weeks ago I was at a buddies house and he was welding up some 1/8 inch thick mild steel using a DC tig inverter machine. He was using thoriated tungstun with 15 cu ft flow of pure Argon. This was outside; not in a confined space.

    I noticed after 5 minutes of intermittent welding a strong smell of ozone, but didn't think anything of it. 30 minutes after he started welding I went home.

    On my way home, I felt strange; my chest felt tight and I had a hard time getting a breath. I could move air in and out but it didn't feel like my lungs were processing much of it. I thought I was going to pass out. It took 3 days before my breathing came back to normal. My mouth had a metalic taste during that time.

    The next week I watched him weld some more but this time I stood 25 feet away. I noticed my chest felt tight but not as much as the first time and it only took a day for my breathing/chest tightness to return to normal.

    I never experienced this phenomena before even with co2 MIG welding.

    My buddy thinks I'm overly sensitive to Argon. What sayest you?

    :ear
  18. mattlikesbikes

    mattlikesbikes Been here awhile

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    So tacking nuts to the back of a steel plate, can I use a bolt to hold the nut in the right place? Fully tighten it, then come back and tack the nut on 2-3 sides? How about using a blow torch to just heat it all up and droping a dab of braze on the spot? I assume the risk is I end up welding the bolt into the nut?

    I don't have super easy access to welding equipment, hence the push to try this with what I can get, a blow torch.
  19. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

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    Define blow torch. You need oxy-acet or oxy-propane to reach brazing temperatures (assuming brass).
  20. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

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    Air is ~1% argon.