Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. EvoLife

    EvoLife Evolving.....Slowly

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    Drill out the hole and press in an aluminum plug so it sits recessed on both sides. Then weld and prep for plating as normal. Depending on what the part is, pressing in a tight fitting plug flush may be sufficient and not require welding at all.
  2. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I really get these every week. This one is a heat treating furnace. 5/8 bolt broken flush with the front. The bolt hols the sill for the heavy door and the pin (rod) the door slides up and down on. I was asked to weld the door sill and rod to the furnace. Its cast Iron, so I said no, I will just remove the broken stud.

    [​IMG]



    I used my Lincoln V160s with 3/32 7018 out of the oven. I built up the end of the stud. As I was chipping the slag off, I could see the stud moving, so I welded a nut to it. I let it cool then screwed the "bolt" out.

    [​IMG]

    An easy one. Charge? Service call 1.5 hours.

    [​IMG]

    See what aI mean, they all look the same after a while.

    David
  3. The Velvet Monkey

    The Velvet Monkey Been here awhile

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    I'm hoping someone can give me some sage advice.

    I've enrolled in a welding class at my local vocational institute and had my first class last night, which focused on stick welding. It was a really good class, we were using 6010 rods on 1/4" steel plate, but I'm concerned about the fumes that I inhaled while practicing my technique over a few hours.

    The classroom has booths with adjustable ventilation hoods, but I still seemed to be exposed to--what seemed to me, at least--a lot of smoke before the ventilation hood, even at its closest position, could pick it up. It took me a while to realize that the ventilation hoods weren't particularly strong before I put the hood down as far as it would go and still enable me to work. On a couple of occasions the smoke roiled underneath and into my helmet and, while I tried my best to avoid inhaling it, I probably inhaled a fair bit.

    This may be completely hypochondriacally (because I've found my exposure worrisome, and I'm prone to such feelings), but today I feel like I have slightly irritated throat after having last night felt a vague metallic taste in my mouth.

    I can't imagine that one can inhale this smoke without suffering detrimental health consequences. When I mentioned the issue to few of my fellow students and the instructor (who, incidentally has a horrific cough and confessed to COPD after 55 years of welding), they acknowledged the problem, but no one seems particularly concerned.

    So I guess my questions are:

    Am I being overly sensitive to the consequences of inhaling the amount of smoke that persists under the circumstances of the ventilated welding booth? Perhaps the amount I'm inhaling does not pose a material risk over the course of the class, and I don't intend to weld except as a hobbyist.

    Or, has my seemingly benign desire to pick up the welding skill already exposed me, albeit unintentionally, to a significant and dangerous dose of toxic substances--toxins that are at this moment congealing within me, a time bomb that will resurface at the most inopportune time in my future (like after I win the Power Ball) so as to strike me down with a horrible illness providing a horrifically slow death, during which I beg for sweet release and curse the day I picked up a welding rod--and I would be foolish to ever again stick weld?

    In any event, I'd like to continue the class, if I can do so (or am already doing so under the circumstances) safely.
  4. NitroAcres

    NitroAcres MotoBiggots Suck

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    STOP NOW...Take up a new Hobby/Profession, perhaps something in HealthCare.

    Welding is NOT SAFE and NEVER will be 100% Safe...anyone who tells you otherwise is WRONG.

    I have been doing it 37+ yrs.
  5. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    No, welding fumes are horrible.

    Next time you open a box of welding rod read the MSDS sheet.

    Parkinsons, motor control issues, slurred speech, cognitive problems all brought about by welding fumes.

    Especially the heavy metals in the fumes.

    Your shop should have a better ventilation system than that. Sometimes the system gets stuffed up and it won't move much air.

    Two things, if you have the adjustable ventilation hoods, keep it down as close to your work as you can so it will remove the bulk of the fumes, and keep your head out of the weld. A lot of new welders, especially those who haven't done any welding before, will put their lense right down in the work in order to see the puddle. If you find your lense is constantly smudges over by smoke, you're in too close, Learn to pull back a bit and see what you're welding from a bit further back

    Other than that there are high velocity fans which we use to pull the fumes away and some of them aren't terribly expensive. There are also respirators for this purpose, but they are not pleasant to wear under a hood.

    Long and short of it: Short term exposure is not a significant issue. Long term exposure is the serious issue.

    I'm a steamfitter by trade. We die earlier on average then the general public-- cutting, welding, grinding are three big reasons.


    If you think you'll do this seriously or often enough think about creating your own ventilation or look for a better facility. For a guy doing it a couple nights a week for 4 hours a shot, I wouldn't worry myself. But try to keep your face out of the smoke.
  6. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

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    Coming out of high school, I was signed up for a vocational welding school. Even with pretty good booths in high school, the amount of crap I blew out of my nose was alarming. Partly because of this, I changed my mind at the last minute & went into engineering instead. Welding is a fun hobby.
  7. dmaxmike

    dmaxmike former quadtard.

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    don't stick weld... the cleanest form of welding in TIG welding, with MIG welding a distant second. you don't know what sick is till you "just tack" some galvanized together.

    but the farther away from the work piece the better and good ventilation is the key. not so good that it sucks or blows your shielding gas away though.

    and a good helmet is also key, harbor fright is not the place to shop for a helmet no matter what anyone says, even if your just doing it for a hobby. you will know when you wake up the next day if your helmet is not up to snuff because your eyes will hurt and there is no soothing it.
  8. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    I concur with dmaxmike.

    I don't think he's got to worry about his shield quite yet. No QC to bust him on porosity. :rofl
  9. fxstbiluigi

    fxstbiluigi crash test dummy

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    +1
  10. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I try not to breathe the fumes.
    I try to master ALL welding process.

    I do know if I breathe galvanized fumes (the white smoke) it gives me the shits and the shakes in the middle of the night. It only takes once.

    I weld some nice clean parts from machine shops. The cutting oil gets hot and makes all kinds of smoke. I finally built a ventilation system using a saw dust system from harbor freight and a garbage can lid for a hood.

    The cleaner your work is the better the weld and less hazard to you. Parts I tig get cleaned with a rag and alcohol based solvent. Just don't leave the rag or solvent near the welding bench :kboom

    David
  11. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    The fumes are bad, but you learn to keep your head out of them pretty early on. You don't need to be right above the weld, just as long as you can see what you're doing. When I was first learning I used to do the same thing, get too close trying to pay attention.

    I wear a respirator at work a lot, it's not too bad under a hood as long as it's not a real hot day. When it's too hot I sweat a lot and fog up glasses. Not much you can do then, one way or another you're screwed

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  12. dmaxmike

    dmaxmike former quadtard.

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    he should learn it for sure as its always a good skill to have, but once he has it he should move on. besides custom bits for motorcycles and other hobby stuff looks better MIG or TIG welded. and you can even get a name brand 110v MIG or TIG machine for not a whole lot more then a Lincoln tombstone.

    we don't even have a stick machine in our shop and we try and try to get the local vo-tech schools to teach more TIG/sub arc/MIG and less stick but they seem to think that everyone going there is going to go buy a truck and be a pipeline welder and that's just not true.
  13. MikeinEugene

    MikeinEugene Long timer

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    Not really a question, more of an informative post so future googlers may save some time searching.

    I picked up an old Central Electric (Harbor Freight) Power Mig 180/1 off of CL a while back. It needed some gun parts. Not sure what the PO did to it but the nozzle was gone & the gas diffuser was mangled pretty severely.

    This is a large heavy model, not like the newer 180s that will fit on a cart. This one came with wheels and was made in Italy instead of China.

    I took the diffuser to 3 local welding shops & none of them had ever seen anything like it. I spent a lot of time googling & trying to find it with no luck. Ended up using google's image search for gas diffuser until I found one that looked close. Ended up being a Clarke 180EN equivalent.

    I ordered the diffuser, a nozzle & a 10 pack of tips from usawelding.com as their site had the picture & a nice zoom of it along with the specs :clap

    Here's the diffuser, straight from their site:
    [​IMG]

    All I need now is a regulator for my CO2 tank & I'll be in business :clap
  14. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    Most of the fume emitted from a 6010 rod is iron oxide. You also create ozone when the arc light ( ultraviolet) hits oxygen in the area around the arc. For the most part the fumes are just irritants and have no long term effects. I would try to avoid all welding fume. Set the fume hood as close to your weldment as possible. Stainless steels are bad for you and the hexavailant chrome is not good to breath.
  15. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Bad is an understatement. Respirators only when welding stainless unless you have excellent ventilation. Hex chrome will kill you if you breath enough of it. It's arguably worse than asbestos depending on who you talk to.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  16. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    TL;DR

    Last year I bought a property with a 2K SF shop.

    I have a project in mind for one of my trucks and I decided that it would be best if I did most of the fabrication instead of farming it out.

    So I need to start equipping the shop.

    One of the first things I decided would be good to get would be gas torch; oxy-acetylene (and propane too for preheating and other things).

    So I was looking through CL for a deal on a complete setup, but at the prices and condition of rigs that I saw for sale, I decided maybe it would be better (and possibly safer) if I bought something new.

    Now I have used a torch before for cutting and welding small things - took classes even. But it has been over thirty years and stuff changes. I noticed the Victor brand is still around and that is what we used everywhere I ever worked or took classes.

    But they have been bought out?

    They also have a new fangled regulator tech that looks nice, but I thought I would ask:

    a) Is Victor still a good brand?

    b) Is the new regulator tech they are selling good or are the old fashioned regulators better?

    Thanks.
  17. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    I just checked OHSA's website. Hex chrome causes more deaths per 1000 workers than asbestos.

    This is not something to mess around with.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  18. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    If it hasn't already been mentioned, another thing that is really bad for you and can make you sick pretty fast is zinc oxide from welding anything galvanized without really good ventilation.

    DAMHIK
  19. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    I'm becoming a proselytizer for good respirators, and it sound funny coming from my mouth. But after years of hating wearing dust masks, and thinking of reasons not to, I got a decent 3m half mask to wear- it's far better, and it's actually pleasant to wear (as opposed to breathing nasty air). I got a 3m 7502, and it fits under a welding hood, and is pretty good about not fogging hood or glasses up. For about $40 with cartridges, it's a great investment. You really notice how nice it is to wear one of these things after a couple hours of grinding. . . . . .
  20. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    IIRC Harris is another quality supplier. I believe they made the torches I bought from Sears (Craftsman), about 1975; you know, back when you could buy quality stuff there.