Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

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    Hexchrome is typically a plating material on regular steel.
  2. RAZ1

    RAZ1 Airhead fan

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    What I know about welding is just enough to not try it myself.

    I need an attachment pin re-welded on an oilhead muffler. The pin and its bracket appear to be stainless steel. The friend I rely on for welding doesn't have SS-specific equipment. Can the parts be welded using regular rods?

    TIS


  3. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    The work I did on my oilhead showed me it was a SS exhaust.

    Your friend only needs SS filler. Tig filler, Mig wire, or even SS stick rod.
    If you use carbon steel filler, it will rust.

    David
  4. CodyY

    CodyY ADVenture Capitalist

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    Buy him a small spool of 316 for his trouble
  5. fxstbiluigi

    fxstbiluigi crash test dummy

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    You'll need a bottle of 75/25 gas to go along with the wire or if you plan to TIG it you'll need a bottle of argon.

    oops.... Tri-mix works too.
  6. Spacelord

    Spacelord Mutha Mutha

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    37 years, You should retire and give me that SW and that big table.
  7. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Not to knock your friend's skill, but it kind of sounds like he doesn't know how to weld stainless. Unless he has only a MIG welder?

    Stainless can be stick welded, best to use either 308 or 309. 308 is for stainless to stainless. 309 is designed for stainless to mild steel, but is also used when you don't know one or both of the materials. Not supposed to do that, but it happens.

    If he does have a stick welder and the material is thick enough and he knows what he's doing it's an easy job. If any of the above is lacking go to a weld shop. Material thickness required for stick welding is proportional to skill and experience. Stainless will burn through easier than mild steel and is harder to weld. I've been welding it for a while now and I'd be comfortable as long as one of the pieces is about 1/8" thick. The other one can be thinner as long as there is proper fitup, as the heat can be focused on the thicker side and dragged across. Hard to explain but easy to demonstrate I'm sorry to say.

    For TIG welding thickness doesn't matter as long as the welder is skilled. I've TIG welded some fairly thin material, maybe 1/16", and have seen much thinner welded. There's a video on www.weldingtipsandtricks.com where the guy welds 2 razor blades together.

    If its MIG, I'm not sure what to tell you. We rarely mig stainless at work, and at home I always stick weld it. The mig we have used at work has always been on thicker stuff when the company doesn't want to spend the time on stick. 1/2"-1" thick kind of stuff, just crank the heat up and run with it. I do know that we always use a different type of gas mixture, which to me seems random because it's rarely the same. Maybe different grades of stainless or something, I don't know.


    Edit: just saw the above posts about mig, they are more knowlegeable than me on that aspect. Might be cheaper to pay a shop, argon bottles are expensive considering how much work you actually need done.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  8. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Hex chrome is dissolved in the electroplating solution used for chroming. The electroplating process converts the hexavalent chromium to metallic chromium. There is no hex chrome in either stainless or plated metal. It takes much energy and a strong oxidizing environment to turn metallic chromium into the hexavalent form. These conditions can be created by arc welding.

    http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.asp?csem=10&po=7#tocbookmark2

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
  9. fxstbiluigi

    fxstbiluigi crash test dummy

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    Depending on the 'type'(alloy) stainless can contain anywhere from 17% to 26% chrome and when welded the vapors from repeated exposure can cause severe neurological damage.
  10. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

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    Hexavalent Chromium (aka; chrome 6 or hex chrome) is the bad chrome and it's fumes are what you should worry about. That being said, "Hex Chrome" is not the major type of chrome found in Stainless Steel or in the fumes created in the welding process. If you really want to know about the potential dangers you need to read up on Chromium and the many different forms it is found in. Beware that you may also might learn the difference between a vapor and a fume.
  11. NitroAcres

    NitroAcres MotoBiggots Suck

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    Ha~!!!! I am still Learning....and enjoying welding, I just ran that BigGirl last nite on a huge ass Stainless Pump, first time off the Dynasty's in a while..

    You should stop by and visit sometime.:deal

    (You better be careful..I will put you to work on the SW..)
  12. fxstbiluigi

    fxstbiluigi crash test dummy

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    the dictionary that I have uses fume and vapor as interchangeable, as well as everything else I've looked at.

    Would you be so kind as to point out the difference between the two for the class?
  13. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

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    No problem:

    "A fume is technically a solid. Welding or soldering you deal with fumes; lead, copper, rosin, tin, etc.
    A vapor comes from a liquid. Water vapors, gasoline vapors, chlorine vapors, etc.


    This comes from Cal-OSHA (California occupations safety and health administration) Hazwoper (Hazardous worker operations) certification course."
  14. Stan_R80/7

    Stan_R80/7 Beastly Gnarly

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    The difference between fume and vapor determines what type of respirator or personal protection device is suitable. A respirator with only filter media can separate fume particles (provided the filtration is fine enough) but not vapors. Activated charcoal or another method is needed to remove vapors (generally gases).

    Having good ventilation goes a long way in removing hazards from welding. For shop work, it's worth the extra effort and trouble to have some fresh air by opening a couple of doors or moving the work. Sometimes that is not possible and a respirator or other device should be used.
  15. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    Currently making suspension mounts for bigger axles under the Landcruiser, obviously it's important that these are done right. These are the 1st with a few to go yet so hit me with any suggestions for improvement :D

    [​IMG]

    200A TIG, ( Edit, actually 2.4mm 3/32" tungsten, 3mm ~1/8" filler) ER70S6 filler. 4-5-6mm steel.

    [​IMG]

    Cheers
    Clint
  16. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Clint, they look good.

    I would position the work so I could weld through the corners instead of stop at them. Start and stop are easier in a straight line.

    This is only for looks, they are not going to break. :evil

    IF you are really using 3/16 filler, I would go down to 1/16 or 3/32.

    Same with the tungsten I would be using 3/32. The smaller the better its cheaper and easier to sharpen. 1/16 will blow like a fuse at 200 amps. 3/32 is just right for me.

    They look great.

    David
  17. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    Thanks David, Good point on the corners, will give it a go.

    Duh... metric/imperial conversions not computing very well today... it was 3mm filler I was using - just under 1/8". I have plenty of 3/32" so will try that. I am using 3/32 for the 4mm/5mm stuff but previous 5mm/6mm welds I was having to push in a lot of 3/32 filler to keep the weld getting too skinny & concave (to my eye) so I switched to the bigger filler. It is a 3/32 tungsten I'm using too.

    Cheers
    Clint
  18. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    If you are making these parts commercially why not look at Mig welding them? Only take a 1/4 of the time, and with a bit of simple prep work will be fine in terms of strength.
  19. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    It's not a commercial job, by a few more I mean another 5 chassis-arm mounts on this project plus some other sundry bits on similar material. It sure would be nice to have a MIG in the shed also for this sort of work, but the TIG does lots of other stuff well so I'm happy with the compromise.

    Cheers
    Clint
  20. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    TIG will be fine if you are not making them commercially. I would suggest trying 2.4 tungsten and filler rod, and increase or decrease travel speed to get the required weld profile.