Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    Cheers guys, took note of your advice while sticking those 2 brackets on the chassis & they have come out pretty good. A few of the beads were in difficult positions & aren't the prettiest but I also laid down my bestest vertical weld ever. The TIG is certainly a different animal than the stick for out of position work as I've never pulled off a vertical stick weld anything like as tidy as I've done with the TIG.

    Cheers
    Clint
  2. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Pictures clintz, the good the bad and the ugly :D

    David
  3. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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  4. Danjal

    Danjal Insert wit here.

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    Here's a good one. Thermal arc 186 vs Lincoln precision tig 225 vs whatever else that has enough adjustments for an experienced welder. Most of the use will be 1/8" alum or smaller. Does anyone have experience with these or similar that can make buying suggestions?
  5. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Ha! I have both. Arcmaster all the way. More when I am not in this silly phone.

    From the phone in my shoe
    Maxwell Smart Agent 86
  6. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    I tried a Thermal Arc 201 inverter a couple of weeks ago, and for the money it seemed very good indeed. Has features such as pulse, which a few years ago were only found on higher range sets.
  7. CodyY

    CodyY ADVenture Capitalist

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    I'm eyeing the 180i, good to hear
  8. Danjal

    Danjal Insert wit here.

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    Fabricator 181i?

    Skip to the 211i at the least. Auto gas solenoid, higher duty cycle, and capable of larger spools, and dual voltage for starters over the 181.

    I skipped it ultimately because the tig function wouldn't have been useful to me in the least. I needed an ac tig to do alum, the fabricator series are DC only. But, I demoed the 181i, good box. Id have been happy with it if it had some of the extra features of the 211i and walked out the door that day with it. But, the 211i was slated for release, and I was waiting on it.
  9. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I had an Arcmaster 185 for 7 years and I finally burned it up. I needed a replacement quick, so I bought the PT225. The PT175 was on sale, but I needed more balls for a specific job.

    The PT225 is OK and will weld aluminum, but it kicks a 60 amp breaker where the arcmaster would not kick a 30.

    Arcmaster has a spot weld timer I use when tacking some oil cooler tanks. PT225 does not.

    Arcmaster has adjustable Hz for AC.
    Acrmaster has 2T and 4T switch
    Arcmaster tells how much wave balance in %


    Both have pulse which I never use anyhow.
    Arcmaster you can set background current on pulse.
    Pt225 background current is 50% of welding current.
    Arcmaster pulse readout is in Hz, down to .1 hz which is really slow.
    PT225 is from slow to fast, no numbers so it cannot be repeated with out trial and error.
    Arcmaster was not too good of a stick welder, but its not what I bought it for. I have 2 V350pro.

    I will be getting my arcmaster fixed or buying another one and keeping the PT225 as a back up or spare.

    There is nothing hobby aobut the arcmaster, I used it in my shop for years some times days at a time.
  10. lightfighter

    lightfighter where does this go?

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    heres a silly question...

    im going to pick up a miller 211 tommorow. :clap

    i dont have 240 in my garage, yet. there is a retired hottub outlet on the porch, i need to crawl up into the roof, and drag the wire back to the garage before i can hook 240 up.

    but since the welder runs 120... and im only welding 1/8 plate and .095 wall tube... does it even matter? will the 211 run better on 240?

    background: i havent welded more than a couple tacks in 15 years. i was pretty good with a stick and ok with mig and oxy/acet back then, but the whole idea of welding again is kind of a mid life crisis. i have a few projects in mind, and i feel like i need to re learn an old skill anyway.
  11. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Its not a silly question.

    On 110 v your new welder will only put out about 88 amps of welding power at welding voltage. This is about right for .095 tubing but a little short for 1/8" plate. It will do it IF YOU HAVE A 20 AMP CIrCUIt.

    It will stick weld with 1/16" or 5/64 rod, you know the kind that shakes in the electrode holder? It will pop breakers even with 3/32 rod at 85 amps.

    It will tig weld up till it pops your breaker again about 85 or so amps.

    Just as a guess you are going to run .030 wire or .035 once you have the correct circuit.

    On 110 volts it will run better on .023 wire (like a 110 mig) :D


    enjoy your new toy
    David
  12. Danjal

    Danjal Insert wit here.

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    Yes it will always run better with more voltage. About the only time more voltage on a welder will get you into trouble is welding really thin stuff. Then you can pulse it, or should've got a box that can go that thin.

    Rated output:
    150 Amps at 23.5 VDC, 30% duty cycle (230 V)
    90 Amps at 20 VDC, 20% duty cycle (120 V)

    Maximum amperage:
    30 –210 A (230)
    30 –140 A (120)

    https://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/spec_sheets/DC12-54.pdf
  13. lightfighter

    lightfighter where does this go?

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    Dagnabit.

    Not only have I only got 15's available in the garage, they are both ganged with other stuff(one is the gfi for all the outdoor and bathrooms, and the other has lights outside and in the garage, as well as a fridge.)

    I guess I'll just break lazy and crawl into the roof to get her done. I'll basically be relearning this stuff and it would be silly to start half assed where the whole ass is available.
  14. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    The Good (ish):

    [​IMG]

    ... if you ignore the tit where the up meets the down, & the crap back into the corner at the bottom...and...and...:lol3

    The Bad:

    [​IMG]

    ... well, it's still attached pretty good, but damn messy by comparison.

    & The Ugly:

    [​IMG]

    ... after going back over this with the torch to melt it in properly to both sides. Access to this one was the hardest.

    Bear in mind these were all in a difficult position as I couldn't see the weld puddle very well most of the time, couldn't always get the torch or filler angle right either.

    Is it a better idea to go vertical down when doing overhead vertical welds so one can see the puddle, or will a messy vertical up still be the better weld?

    Cheers
    Clint
  15. JonnyCash

    JonnyCash turd polisher

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    I'd say that considering the shitty conditions and positions you had to do it in, you did a very good job. MIG or stick sure would have been the more appropriate process, but in the end, I'm sure this will do well. God damn, you must have gone through a hell of a lot of argon doing it!
  16. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    WELD UP. Down is for car exhaust and a few pipe welders.
    Your up looks better anyhow.

    Once you get better, you will not have to "go back over it" and should not anyhow.

    Thanks for the pictures!

    I don't think it could break if you tried.

    More heat and move faster will help. It took me years to get good at it.

    Lower heat and going slow puts more heat into the metal and makes puddle control harder. Just keep at it.

    Looking good
    David
  17. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    Yes vertical up for a structural weld. It gives your arc time to dig in and penetrate before the puddle covers it up. You get good penetration with TIG so you should be alright. Besides that bracket will see mostly compresson forces.
  18. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Here is another one. Broken bolt in aluminum motor mount for a radio controlled car. This bolt is no bigger than 3mm. My son welded a nut to it and screwed it out.

    [​IMG]

    I will stop now.....
  19. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    Look how the heat cooked the galvanized bolt into a zinc oxide powder coating.
  20. motu

    motu Loose Pre Unit

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    I used to work next door to a crusty old ex boiler maker - he looked at me in disbelief when I mentioned I was going to vertical down a weld...''No such thing as a vertical down !! That's a farmer's weld!!'' I've tried to stay away from vertical downs, but sometimes with difficult access it's not the best, but the easiest way.