Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,540
    Location:
    Santa Susana, CA
    Balloons?? Try 55 gallon yard & garden trash bags like we were doing in High School right after the Metal Shop teacher showed us the dangers of O/A with a little balloon. Prolly did 20 of them over a period of a couple of weeks. Local Police Dept was getting pissed at all of these mysterious large explosions in a residential neighborhood. Final straw was 2 friends using a rose bud to fill the trash bag. As the bag rapidly filled, a static charge left them with blown ear drums and no eye brows or hair on their foreheads! Holding the bag so to speak.
  2. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    7,990
    Location:
    SE Denver-ish
    :rofl young boys are so fukin' stoopid :rofl
  3. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,540
    Location:
    Santa Susana, CA
    Can't believe we are still alive!
  4. CodyY

    CodyY ADVenture Capitalist

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,510
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    Whatever needed cutting. Scarf teeth off a bucket? Pre-heat some aluminum? Pop some holes in sheet metal? Nip the corners off some 1/4" flat bar?

    Grab a torch!


    Thats ok, I don't work there anymore either.

    Every time I turned the pressures down to spec one of the "Ive been doin' this for 30 years and you don't know shit" guys goes behind me and cranks em up. :rolleyes
  5. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,864
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    Any thoughts on welding 12l14?

    I am making pannier mounts for my ninja and the fronts shown are crs dom tubing which tig welds great. I machined threaded caps for the tubing and all was well.

    The back studs which aren't shown, I mistakenly grabbed a piece of leaded steel because they were so short I decided to lathe it out of rod.

    [​IMG]

    I only figured it out when it was not welding normally. But I did seem to get a decent weld. This part isn't critical as the front studs are are welded tubing and overkill as it is. Plus my wolfman bags have straps over the seats.

    Does this weld stand a chance in the lightly loaded scenario or should I cut it off and start over? Any recommendations for steel that machines well on a home lathe setup and also welds well? 12l14 sure does turn nicely.

    I'll toss up a pic of the actual welds when I get home. I was tig welding, red tungsten, pure argon, 100a 70s6 filler
  6. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,864
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    Heres the actual stud from leaded steel I was welding.

    [​IMG]
  7. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

    Joined:
    May 17, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,665
    Location:
    Rotoiti, New Zealand
    Make up a test piece with the same stuff, take to it with hammer & you should get an idea :D

    I've machined up a few small bushes & things out of 4140 bar then welded it to 4130 tube with good results. On my basic gear, Atlas 10F & hand ground HSS tool, it didn't seem wildly different to mild steel.

    No doubt there are specialist grades that are optimised for machining+welding but they don't sell them by the metre at my local engineering supplies store like 4140:wink:

    Cheers
    Clint
  8. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,646
    Location:
    In Da Swamps of WNY
    I think your welds look good and will be fine. Leaded steel is to lubricate the tool when cutting it. It just turns nice.

    I don't think you have a problem.

    David
  9. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,864
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap

    The welds shown are front the dom tubing. Although the leaded steel looks fine to me. I plan on grabbing hold of it and yanking:wink: and see what happens. Usually fun stuff I imagine.
  10. Ironwood

    Ironwood Friday Harbor, WA

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    803
    In your pic it doesn't look like you are disconnecting the computer. That is #1 whenever I weld on a chassis.
  11. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,864
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    The computer Cdi is under the seat bar, that's a triple set of relays encased in plastic. Right now everything wiring wise is basically disconnected, battery is out etc.
  12. Benesesso

    Benesesso Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    9,898
    Location:
    West of Phoenix, Arizona
    It's the added sulfur that causes problems. If lightly stressed you may get away with it.

    Check out #4. :1drink

    http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/welding-303-stainless.html
  13. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,139
    Location:
    Oxbow Lake
    Free machining steels usually contain too much lead and sulphur to weld. The problem with them is that the lead and sulfur migrate to the grain boundaries of the matrix and freeze last. Since lead tends to be much lower strength than steel you get a weak line in your weld. If the sulfur does not crack the weld initially the lead will be where a crack will appear if put under force. So don't use free machining steels if you need to weld them. Max sulfur is .014% or .14% if I recall. Phosphorous and lead are similarly bad.
  14. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,139
    Location:
    Oxbow Lake

    It sounds like you are having a wire feeling problem. Start by using a new tip. Your should be able to feed wire against your glove without the wire stopping. If it does check that your drive roll tension is set properly and the hub holding the reel of wire is not too tight as to cause too much drag on the drive rolls. Your gun liner is probably the culprit as they tend to load up with dirt and dust and hold the wire from feeding freely. The last recommendation is to buy good welding wire. I have seem a lot of off shore brands that have inconsistent diameters or have too much lube on them that makes feeding tough. I recommend Lincoln Electric L-56 for mild steel welding. It is make in the USA and it is a bit more expensive but if it tangles or gives you trouble which it won't you can take it back because they have a 100% satisfaction garantee.
  15. rustycager

    rustycager Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Oddometer:
    822
    Location:
    Hoosier Hills
    I put a harder foam earplug on my wire before the feeder to keep dirt out. They sell felt and foam devices that do the same but earplugs are free. Some people oil the felt but to me that seems like asking for more dirt and troubles.
  16. z@ch

    z@ch Turn it up to eleven

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,752
    Location:
    Tejas Norte
    You can clean out the liner with an air nozzle.

    If your problem isn't the contact tip you could possibly have your drive rolls set too loose.
  17. TymeRider

    TymeRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2005
    Oddometer:
    434
    Location:
    Sunnyvale, CA
    If I'm making some gussets and brackets to weld to the subframe, how important is it to use the same grade steel as the subframe itself? Can you weld mild steel to chrome-moly and visa-versa?

    This is for a BMW X-Country rear subframe, which I assume is made of mild steel like 1018? Or is it chrome-moly like 4130?

    I'm going to make the brackets myself, but have a professional welder do the welding.

    Doug
  18. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad n00balicious

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,540
    Location:
    Santa Susana, CA
    I don't know the BME X-Country, so I googled "BMW+X-Country+rear+subframe" images and every thing I see all looks like aluminum to me.
  19. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,592
    Location:
    Viva Lost Wages!
    Unless you are going to heat treat the whole subframe when you are done, it really won't matter what you weld to it (alloy steel vs carbon steel). Just clean it good before painting it.
  20. TymeRider

    TymeRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2005
    Oddometer:
    434
    Location:
    Sunnyvale, CA
    Just to clarify: Stock X-Challenge frame is aluminum, and that is the only subframe listed on BMW's parts fiche.

    For the X-country, both aluminum and steel versions are available on the BMW parts fiche.

    I have an X-Challenge with the stock aluminum subframe, but have purchased the X-country steel frame from BMW. For all practical purposes the geometry of the X-Country and X-Challenge subframes are the same. There are some difference with regard to passenger pegs, etc.