Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    You should use the Bitchin Camero 5000! It slices and dices and marinades.:rofl
  2. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    ie., a hybrid golf cart. :D At face value, like an automobile, that label makes it sound enviro-friendly :lol3
  3. Matttys

    Matttys Matt the Balloon Guy

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    I'm going to be selling my 110v MIG and will be purchasing a 220v TIG. Specifically, I'm looking at the Lincoln 225 TIG. As I rent, I can't rewire the house to have a 220v plug in the garage; therefore I'm going to make an extension cord to run from my laundry room. I know this has been discussed in the past and I realize all the problems that this could cause. I'm looking at 6/3 or 8/3 wire, but would like to know how many amps the 225 TIGs draw? The drier plug at my house is 30 amp, so I would not like to exceed with a welder that draws more amps.


    Thanks for the help!
  4. The Dude Himself

    The Dude Himself Hooked on Dirt!!

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    I've seen a few floor finishers that run 220V @ 50 amps. The guys pull the face panel off the breaker box and put a set of automotive-jumper-cable-style clamps on the 0000 Al feed. These are attached to their extension cord, which has a 50A breaker inline. The cord is 3/6, IIRC, but should probably be 3/4 based on the length of the run. This would allow you to utilize just about any commercial 220v TIG welder.
  5. Matttys

    Matttys Matt the Balloon Guy

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    Hmm, just got off the phone with the Lincoln folks this morning and it looks like the 225 draws a max of 65 amps :eek1 :eek1 :eek1 :eek1 :eek1 :eek1 :eek1 My apartment is only wired for 30!

    Any ideas on how to proceed from here? Should I still be looking at this welder or should I set my sights a little lower?
  6. The Dude Himself

    The Dude Himself Hooked on Dirt!!

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    Not sure where you're located, but there's a place here in VA that's auctioning off a decent looking motor-driven welder for around $300-400.
  7. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    Matt, without going back and rereading your welding goals, are you going to be welding aluminum or steel over 1/4" thick? If not, then the settings you will be using will be significantly lower than the max rated draw. I've used my 120V MIG on 15 amp circuits several times. And since I'm usually never at the top end of the output range, it never trips a breaker. It's dedicated garage circuit is a 20 amp circuit and out there I've welded up some pretty thick stuff using preheat and running the machine near wide open and doing multiple passes. ( Depending on the job, you can cheat big time by preheating the work pieces to 400-450 F in the oven and then jigging everything up quickly and start pushing wire)

    But back to your dilemma.. If that machine will serve you out into the future, and your immediate needs don't approach its max output, I say get it and save any losses from future machine upgrades. With luck, you won't be tripping the breakers. And if you do, just don't weld stuff that heavy while you live there. And you won't live there forever, so get the machine you will need for a long time. It only draws the current it needs for the settings you are using.
  8. Matttys

    Matttys Matt the Balloon Guy

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    That's what I'm thinking. I was using the 110v MIG on the 15 amp circuit with no problems and I'm only planning on welding up some skid plates and luggage racks; nothing seriously thick. I just want to make sure what ever I buy now isn't something that will only serve me now and not later.

    What is the main difference between the Lincoln 225 and say the Miller 200DX or the Thermal Arc 185? Could the 185 serve my needs just as well? The 200DX is pretty expensive. Why is there such a difference in size between these units? Why is the Lincoln so large that it needs a cart and the Miller 200DX can be carried like a purse?
  9. Squall Line

    Squall Line Adventurer

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    New question:

    I have a thermal arc 185 tig/ stick box... I also have one of the low end lincoln mig welders. I have kicked around the idea of getting a wire feeder and just using the tig box as a power source. Any complications with this idea? I love the adjustability of the thermal arc... The 4 power settings leave much to be desired on my current mig unit. Suggestions on a good feeder would be appreciated as well.

    Thanks,
  10. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    The Lincoln is a transformer based design, while the Thermal Arc and Miller are an inverter design. The inverter units are the more modern design and besides the size and weight advantage, they also have variable output frequency for AC welding.

    I can't think of much on a motorcyle you couldn't handle with the 185. I used mine for shortening my kick stand and center stand and I am about to use it to make a rock guard for my oil cooler (I just need to get my skill level up to do consistently decent welds on 3/32" SS rods)
  11. Matttys

    Matttys Matt the Balloon Guy

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    Are there any noticeable reliability differences between the two? Obviously the variable frequency of the inverters are a good selling point.
  12. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    It will only draw that much amperage if you turn it up all the way then dead short the electrode. You should be fine.
  13. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    What is the main difference between the Lincoln 225 and say the Miller 200DX or the Thermal Arc 185? Could the 185 serve my needs just as well? The 200DX is pretty expensive. Why is there such a difference in size between these units? Why is the Lincoln so large that it needs a cart and the Miller 200DX can be carried like a purse?[/quote]

    Transformer designed TIG welders like the Lincoln Precision TIG 225 use a traditional transformer/rectifier powersupply. These are bigger and heavier because you are using a transformer instead of an inverter which uses PC boards and high amperage switches (IBDT's) to convert the line power to welding power.

    So the transformer machines are less expensive and weigh more, but the inverters are light weight and expensive with more bells and whistles.

    If you need portability and have money then buy an inverter. If you don't want to spend as much and don't mind a bigger machine then the Lincoln 225 is fine.

    The inverters also cost more to fix if they break because PC boards are pricey. Most people don't need the pulsing, variable frequency AC that inverters have but a skilled welder may appreciate.

    Just remember that you always get what you pay for.:wink:
  14. Matttys

    Matttys Matt the Balloon Guy

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    Good summation of the differences. Will I still be able to weld aluminum with the Miller Dynasty 200DX on the 110v setting or is that strictly a higher voltage job? If the thought is that I can weld aluminum skid plates and brackets with the lower voltage setting of the Miller and still have the higher voltage for when I move into another house, then that seems like the best bang for the buck at the moment.

    BTW, I sold my Snap-On Muscle MIG this morning for $50 more than I paid for it at the beginning of the summer :evil
  15. mysterio

    mysterio Eventually an Adventurer.

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    Re; How do know the weld is good? Other than welds that require x-ray checks and all the other very technical stuff, have you ever tried to break an even 'ordinary' weld?
    Err, I didn't check the date on this stuff. Oh well, back to my dreaming...
  16. RingGap

    RingGap UK Expat

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    Your supposed to have a 100 amp service for a Lincoln 255 TIG, though I have got by in the past with 60 amp service, welding 1/4 " 6061 ally plate with no problems.

    Sean
  17. Matttys

    Matttys Matt the Balloon Guy

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    Excellent. Thanks for all the help guys!
  18. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    Hey guys, just started a topic without looking down here...

    http://pittsburgh.craigslist.org/tls/523459916.html

    Thoughts on this welder? I really don't have anything in mind as to what I would do with it, but I like huge tools that are the business. :evil

    Thoughts? Will this machine ever be able to do TIG ala that 225 buzzbox convert above?

    What is a fiar price assuming normal condition?

    Thanks,

    Pete
  19. gsweave

    gsweave Yinz, blinkers are on, since 05

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    .
  20. KTM640Dakar

    KTM640Dakar Motorsick

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    You will need to have 3 Phase electric power inorder to use that machine. Most residence homes only have single phase power.