Aviation MegaThread!!!!

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by EvilGenius, Jan 1, 2009.

  1. 42

    42 Bokononist

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    The Magnificent Seven
  2. NoahDL88

    NoahDL88 Vroom Vroom

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    Thanks! It's hard to search for a song based on Bump, da da da da!
  3. Flying-D

    Flying-D Just Passing Through

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    Which was itself based on a Japanese Samurai movie...
  4. Hay Ewe

    Hay Ewe Just a Wannabe

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    (not to hijack but you need Soundhound - google it)
  5. Bart Jones

    Bart Jones BGY 504

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    <iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Ms84WfJwalI?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  6. kfalls_rider

    kfalls_rider Been here awhile

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    Great video. Thanks
  7. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    My cousin flew those. He retired from Pan Am at seniority number 1 off the 747. He's 95 and still driving, although he stopped flying and sold his humble Cessna 150 a few years ago. He's quite the character and has more than few interesting stories.
  8. Daniii

    Daniii geezer

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    Interestingly, Navigation instrumentation crossing the S. Atlantic in 1942 was the same as when I took my Nav check ride from Santiago Chile to Easter Island in 1968 in a C-130. No piece of cake. But we did have HF radio communication (not that it was any aid in navigation).

    PS: I passed my check ride.
  9. wannaklr

    wannaklr Long timer

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    Why did the Dutch have a shoot to kill order on the Clipper?
  10. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    I doubt they did. The R-1830 engines weren't top secret, either.
  11. pilot815

    pilot815 Long timer

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    Probably had shoot to kill orders on any aircraft. The fact that this was unmarked didn't make it possible for them to ID.


    That video was neat. I have seen it before somewhere in a museum probably. It left me with a few questions though. How did they pay for gas? Did the crew carry large amounts of cash? Maybe the picked it up in New Zealand while they waited. Also the engine that blew up in India, did they fix it, or just fly all the way home on 3?
  12. Trixie

    Trixie No, not that Trixie

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    I've also come across a much more detailed recount of the adventure. It addressed some of the mech and financial issues and the creativity the crew used to overcome both. Being a premier craft in the best airline in the biz (at that time) certainly helped, too.
  13. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Not that it didn't happen but I've read most of not all the Pan Am histories and haven't heard about this event.
    As for other points: I know that many charter companies (even at least one regular scheduled airlines) going to out of the way places with shaky social infrastructure had (or have) a safe box on the plane with considerable cash on-board - usually good old USD greenbacks. Other points: while some 4 engine aircraft have taken off on three engines (essentially empty-ferry flights) I doubt that plane could take off on 3 engines with enough fuel for an ocean crossing, and I don't believe those engines were "top secret" either. It does make the story a little richer though.
  14. vspeed

    vspeed Been here awhile

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    Any of you guys fly sailplanes?

    A long time ago I took a few lessons and got soloed in an old Schweizer. Never finished the rating though.

    20 years and 12,000 (powered) hours later, I'm thinking about getting back into gliders and finishing my rating. I haven't flown any kind of light aircraft since about 1995, so it could be interesting :eek1.
  15. Flying-D

    Flying-D Just Passing Through

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    No soaring around here, unfortunately. I went up a bunch when I was at the USAF Academy as a controller in the early 80's. They had 2-33's and some high(er) performance stuff too. Flew in the towplanes quite often too. Perfect soaring there with mountain and ridge waves, plus good and easy to find thermals over some of the larger developed areas at the academy on calmer days. I can't imagine soaring in some areas where it's pretty much a trip around the pattern and that's it.
  16. vspeed

    vspeed Been here awhile

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    Yeah I don't think Ohio is exactly a soaring "mecca" either. But I'm sure you can catch a thermal here and there during the summer. I might get into the towplanes too. I've really missed flying light planes, this might be a good way to get back into it.
  17. wannaklr

    wannaklr Long timer

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    I took a few sailplane flights at a small glider port north of Cincy. I googled the area and Caesar Creek Soaring Club popped up. They had a pretty nice group of people.
  18. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Me too. I've keep telling myself that I should get into soaring for a long time - and I live close enough to a premier area, the Sierra's. My imagination was that it is an idyllic sort of flying, smooth and silent. But no, I imagine low wing loading and the Sierra's thermals make it quite the opposite. But probably you're so interested in staying aloft and getting lift that you'll take the pounding. After large airplanes if you haven't flown a light plane for a long time it is indeed pretty fun, after the initial over rotation....I've found there's more "fun" and aesthetics in light planes, but less safety/redundancy and more getting beaten up.
  19. pilot815

    pilot815 Long timer

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  20. vspeed

    vspeed Been here awhile

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    Yeah I'm expecting the controls in a glider to require a much lighter touch than the airliners do. I'm wondering about the cockpit height difference too, in regards to judging the landing flare. I don't know how high above the ground the cockpit seat is in my jet when it's sitting on it's landing gear, but it's got to be at least 10 or 12 feet. When the jet's main gear touch down on landing, my eye level is probably 15 or 20 feet in the air. In the glider it will only be about 3 or 4 feet up. I'm sure that will take some getting used to.