B.C. Best Places to Retire Thread.

Discussion in 'Canada' started by yamalama, Feb 13, 2015.

  1. gunnerbuck

    gunnerbuck Island Hopper

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    Qualicum is a lot farther south than the halfway point of the Island... It is a nice place and has really attracted the retirement crowd... I like how they have manged to keep their down town area full of small independent shops rather than a strip of box stores.. We looked at that area, but it did not tick enough boxes to consider it a candidate...

    It is funny, the "remote-ish" to the north of Campbell River that you dislike is what ticked the most boxes on my best place to move to page... There is so much to do up that way for me, today we climbed a mountain and visited a plane crash wreck, Next week we will go camping towards the west side and watch the bears fish from our site..
    shuswap1 likes this.
  2. yamalama

    yamalama wet coaster

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    wanting reasonable health care (as one ages) can certainly narrow down the retirement location options within BC.
    Steve G. likes this.
  3. Calibre

    Calibre Been here awhile

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    That's actually not a downside to me, except that I'm not willing to essentially cut ties to family and friends back in Vancouver. I LOVED the outdoors-y edge of civilization feel of CR. Loved it.
    Fishnbiker likes this.
  4. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    That's true. But it is 1/2 way civilization wise. There's a whole bunch of nothing north of Campbell River, except Pt. McNeil and Hardy.
  5. gunnerbuck

    gunnerbuck Island Hopper

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    That is what makes it a great location, all the amenities of a big city, and then just a short hop and your into the boonies.. You may like the chaos of big city life day in, day out and that is OK if that what makes you happy... I am quite the opposite as having those empty lands close by to provide a quick escape from the urban lifestyle is good for my soul... If there is a constant need to be in the big city {GVRD}, then living on the Island is probably not the best plan as it makes you a slave to the ferries...
    Adanac rider likes this.
  6. Fishnbiker

    Fishnbiker Tire smuddy, hook swet

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    I moved to CR from YVR in 1994. Never looked back. Enough of everything in town (except a Vietnamese restaurant) or nearby. A long day ride would see you getting to Tofino & back. In the bush, riding is almost unlimited. As Gunnerbuck says; a lot on depends on your big city fix. Can you break the addiction?
  7. borscht zanetti

    borscht zanetti Pura Vida ! ... eh?

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    Funny you mention Vietnamese. That was one my greatest feelings of loss moving here from Victoria - family, friends and ocean kayaking excluded. We now have a kind of Vietnamese restaurant, but it misses the mark.
    Transitioning to a small community from the city means putting one's culture vulture habits aside. Mind you, when I do find a good Vietnamese spot, on my travels ... I likely enjoy it even more. It is a balancing act indeed. But to never have to slog through traffic, have virtually unlimited riding potential, the Koots has been worth the trade off.
    HeidiHo likes this.
  8. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    There's no denying the negative/positive aspects of big city life, nor the negative/positive aspects of rural life [i grew up on 20 acre farm] and I am hyper aware of my surroundings everywhere I go. I see it all. Considering my OCD tendencies, I am not affected by "the grass is greener" anywhere I go. I study the 'grass is greener' basis of others to see if it stands up to scrutiny, as well as my own initial 'grass is greener' to anywhere I am. I am aware, watching my neighbours around me reach senior status, and watching workmates who live in not so "out there" places as Harrison, Agassiz, and Ryder Lake, having to take multiple days off work to take sickly parents to specialists at hospitals surrounding Surrey, and Vancouver hospitals, whereas my neighbours are but 5 minutes away by Fraser Health Handydart service . It's the little things that are not on the real estate sales brochures that I look for.

    One mans chaos is another person's normal. As I enter my 59th year, I still do not consider myself 'anti people', needing to escape to a log cabin at the end of a 1/4 mile gravel driveway. I have relatives who are that way, respect it, and we alas never see them, they slowly have become either crazy cat ladies [yes] or become basically snowed in during winter [yes]. I find it personally illogical to live in a location where one has to drive everywhere to go for everything in one's needs in life. 20 years ago I bought a nice fair sized rancher, partly because I knew that the then small purchase price % to a multi level would come closer % wise as Boomers began to get rid of their kids, and begin to need to avoid stairs. This indeed has happened. Now, I talk to riding buddies who are considering moving away, mostly to the Okanagan valley from Vernon to Osoyoos, and give various reasons. But the underlying reason from all of them is that they could sell their place in "metro" and buy the same up there, and have $200K-350K in the bank. Now that I get. And this will be a consideration when I finally hand in my resignation letter.

    As for riding. Sure, I saw the access points to offroad riding when I was in CR and McNeil this Sept. I see the 10-15 minute travel window to dirt riding from your driveway in CR. I however only have to look out my north facing patio door to see FS roads heading into the coast mtns at Haney, Maple Ridge, kinda like 25 minutes away. One can find wilderness easily in the east and north suburbs of "metro".
  9. Calibre

    Calibre Been here awhile

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    My parents are both long gone, so I really have only myself to worry about healthcare-wise. I've realized in my travels to the Island and previous years to other parts of B.C. that I don't have a city addiction to kick.

    I should have mentioned this before, but I was holding back a little... This will be.. umm... post-marriage. And the kids will be continuing school in New Westminster. So for weekends, wherever it is has to be doable for kid transfer. I looked at seaplane fares for CR and I don't think I could handle that bill often. Nanaimo maybe? Nanaimo's nothing special, but it's 3 hours from New Westminster via ferry vs almost 5 for Campbell River. If I decide in the end I don't want to do ferries every [1?2?] weeks, I'll end up in the Fraser Valley in Agassiz, Chilliwack or Hope. Agassiz would be my last choice. Chilliwack or Hope would be easiest for day-to-day living.
    But CR is my #1 choice if I could find a way to make it work.
  10. yamalama

    yamalama wet coaster

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    Nanaimo does have some great attributes. Being close to the ocean is certainly one of them.
  11. Calibre

    Calibre Been here awhile

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    It's on the list. :thumb It's not bad. I just found it kind of Kelowna-ish. Commercial, sprawling, some traffic. But it does have a Silver City, lol. One of my few real city addictions: movies on the big screen.
  12. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    LOL. Me and movies not so much. Craft Brewers of 'note' are a priority however. Nanaimo's Longwood is very good. CR's Beach Fire is outstanding. Chilliwack's Old Yale is very good. "Metro" has a huge amount. I was in Bellingham today for Cycle Gear's grand opening, it's filled with outstanding craft brewers.
  13. Calibre

    Calibre Been here awhile

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    Lucky for me, I only drink hard stuff when I do drink occasionally. I've never developed a taste for beer! Strange, I know.
    I just looked at the listings for Nanaimo again and found a couple suitable choices in the anticipated price range, so I'll keep it in mind.
    Thanks for chiming in. :thumb