Balancing Tyres

Discussion in 'Australia' started by grumpyoldbstrd, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. grumpyoldbstrd

    grumpyoldbstrd Been here awhile

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    For over 45 years I’ve been changing my own tyres and balancing my wheels. Always installed the tyre with the valve spot at the valve, and then added weights to achieve a reasonable result.

    Just for laughs, I recently checked the balance of a wheel without the tyre and tube, and was surprised at how out of balance it was.

    My question for the collective wisdom: Is it worthwhile trying to balance the wheel before the tyre and tube are installed, and then fine tuning? I’m using a high quality static balancer.

    Always willingly to learn new stuff.

    Cheers,

    GOB
    #1
  2. wassie

    wassie Life is too short for traffic.

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    The same goes for balancing.

    [​IMG]
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  3. MJSfoto1956

    MJSfoto1956 Adventurer

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    Recently added a new 140/60-13 Kenda tire to my scooter. Aligned the tire to the white dot, but notwithstanding, the new tire caused nasty vibration at 40+ mph. Yesterday I added 3oz of Counteract Balancing Beads. Took a total of less than ten minutes to install. While hopeful, I was surprised just how smooth the ride became on the first trip out. I'm a believer now. YMMV.
    #3
  4. rvt

    rvt Big Fat Trail Bikes

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    I used to use sticky weights to balance the rim with rimlock. Then fit the tyre and use clamp on weights to balance the whole assembly. Mainly because sticky weights were cheaper.
    Now I seem to have enough clamp on weights that I do it all in one go.
    I put the dot near the rimlock.
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  5. fayeslane

    fayeslane Rankest of amateurs

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    Did this on my DR rear wheel recently and it was spot on. The rim, tyre, tube combo needs to be balanced as a unit IMO because thats what will cause vibes.
    #5
  6. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

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    I subscribe to the theory (and practice, where practical) of balancing the wheel without the tyre, but with the rimlock and tape. Stick-on weights are good for this. Then use the ballard's-style spoke clamp weights to balance the tyre, as they are infinitely adjustable.
    You only ever have to balance the tyre after that.
    Anecdote : I took a rim to get the tyre changed to Mick Cole m/cycles (after Mick had sold it) and they couldn't balance the front rim 'cos they don't keep the skinny stick-on weights to suit a 1.6 rim.
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  7. rvt

    rvt Big Fat Trail Bikes

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    The sticky weight strips can go crosswise, between the spokes. Bit of a tap with the hammer molds them into shape.
    #7
  8. abhibeckert

    abhibeckert Long timer

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    How fast are you riding?

    My feeling is our highway speed limits are so low it's not important to get balance absolutely perfect, just reasonably close.

    Up here in cairns most of our roads are pretty rough anyway though, so perhaps a balance issue would be more noticeable down south on your fancy smooth highways.

    Whenever I get a tyre fitted by a shop they balance it, and I expect them to do a good job (try to find a trustworthy workshop/etc), but doing tyre changes myself I don't bother with balancing unless I've made a major change (like adding/removing a rim lock).
    #8
  9. Not the Messiah

    Not the Messiah Old enough to know better, but slow learnin'

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    GOB,
    I've been paying "professionals" for tyre fitting and balancing lately, so I've never done stuff like this myself. But if I did: I'd be trying the balancing of the wheel without tyre & tube. Do an extra careful jobbie of it. Then fit the tyre & tube and see what the difference is. I'd be thinking that the difference should be an indicator of the quality of build of the tyre.
    It might be optimistic, but if the tyres are quite consistent then balancing of the wheel might be enough. Or at least good enough to leave out a re-balance if you get caught short of time (you know, the occasion when you find you've got to change a tyre the night before a ride......).

    Cheers
    Brian
    #9
  10. fayeslane

    fayeslane Rankest of amateurs

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    Had a Heidenau that required 80gms to balance. Previous tyre needed 15gms.
    #10
  11. UncleGra

    UncleGra Road Grime

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    Flatten your lead bits and stick them to the rim with the wife's nail glue...or use your own..
    #11
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  12. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Been here awhile

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    Not only is nail glue good for nails, (doh), it is also excellent for cracked heels, and other split skin.
    And wheel weights

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
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  13. tomrux

    tomrux Been here awhile

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    I would like to see what kind of a static balancer you are using. Look up the meaning of the word static. If you are rotating the wheel then it is no longer static. You are just manually doing what the fancy machine is.
    N yeah balance once the whole shebang is together. Same same as doing it in 2 steps.

    Cheers Tom R
    #13
  14. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Been here awhile

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    Yes, the wheel/tyre assembly is static when it stops with the heavy part down, then you add some weight about 180 degrees from there. Spin it yes, but only slowly, until it becomes stationary in totally random positions. Then it is balanced. You also get to look at runout which can also cause vibrations.
    Machines do it dynamically using 'vibration' sensors.
    Come the revolution I will still be able to rely on gravity...

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
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  15. Big Willy

    Big Willy Gen. Italia

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    Oh come on...:lol3
    Dynamic wheel balancer reads out of balance while it is spinning.
    Static wheel balancer tells you the heavy part of the wheel when it has stopped spinning
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  16. grumpyoldbstrd

    grumpyoldbstrd Been here awhile

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    Yes, gravity has always worked for me. Without the tyre and tube I was surprised that the heaviest part was at the valve hole (on both wheels)... kinda counter intuitive. Perhaps that’s where the rim is joined? Wish I knew more about the construction of rims. BTW, this was done with the disc attached (rim locks not used)... could the disc have a heavy spot?

    Anyway, balanced the wheel without the tyre and tube, then installed them and was surprised at how little extra weight was needed to do the final balance. Out in the bush, I used to stress about getting the tyre back in the same spot – not any more. This’ll be my method in the future.
    #16
  17. vagueout

    vagueout Long timer

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    This topic was raised elsewhere on this forum a few years ago, needless to say some very strong opinions were offered going both ways. I'm inclined to think if you do your own it can't hurt to do wheel first then tyre, but of course there are those that reckon balancing at all is a waste of time!:*sip*
    #17
  18. Big Willy

    Big Willy Gen. Italia

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    Nah...they wouldn't drill a hole where the rim joins together.

    I suppose once the rim is balanced, it wouldn't be a bad idea to pump up a tube, place it on the rim (still without a tyre) and see how heavy the valve area is.

    Discs themselves would have a negligible effect on balance as they are close to the centre of the wheel so very little centrifugal effect (imo) and likely to be machined with fine tolerances and even wear in most instances.
    #18
  19. 1coolbanana

    1coolbanana Long timer

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    I recently discovered quite the opposite on a pair of large discs (990).
    Discs made a huge difference to the balance as the mounting holes have a few mm clearance on the screws.
    I ended up clocking the discs on the static balancer to get them within 0.1 TIR and it made a huge difference to the static balance and amount of weight used.
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  20. Big Willy

    Big Willy Gen. Italia

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    Hmmm...well there goes that theory :lol3
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