Basic med kit...

Discussion in 'The Sandbox - AKA Flatistan' started by TitaniumKaren, Feb 27, 2014.

  1. TitaniumKaren

    TitaniumKaren Been here awhile

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    I'm thinking it may be a good idea to carry a small emergency med kit when we ride. Nothing too elaborate like surgical stuff but some basic items to help comfort the fallen rider until help arrives if necessary. Do any of you currently carry one of these kits on the trails and if so what type of items are in it? I remember when I broke my wrist Pete tried to help with a couple of aspirin...but due to wet riding conditions they were already dissolved.:D
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  2. Swashbuckler

    Swashbuckler Been here awhile

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    Duct Tape, Superglue, and those blister bandaidsÂ…..:rofl

    I do carry those at all times though. Those blister bandages are amazing! I cut the front of my shin open, right above my shoe, on my mountain bike pedal (maybe enough to warrant stitches), but threw on one of those blister bandaids and was good to do a 4 day backpacking trip wearing high-top hiking boots and only had to change it twice.

    I also keep some antibiotic cream, some bigger bandages, a wrap, a few antihistamines, and some pain relievers. It all fits in one little ziplock-sized waterproof bag. Just enough stuff to continue on my ride. If I need anything more than that I should probably seek medical attention.

    I've seen the kits you can buy, but they are usually filled with a lot of unnecessary items, super-cheap bandaids that fall off 2 minutes after you put them on, and cost $40 for the same stuff you could buy for $10 at the store.
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  3. r_bin

    r_bin Been here awhile

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  4. Colemanfu

    Colemanfu King of all manfu

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    I carry some basic athletic tape, pre wrap and band aids. That's about it. I do carry a Fox 40 whistle as well as a mini flashing light and flashlight JIC.
    #4
  5. HTSRocker

    HTSRocker odd one

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    A ballpeen hammer, a large safety pin and a flask of cheap but high octane elixir.
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  6. DirtMedic

    DirtMedic Intrepid Explorer

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    As a paramedic going on group rides I have seen all sorts of kits. Everyone assumes I carry a huge kit. The truth is I carry a cell phone and a small kit. Many people over do their kits. A cell phone and telling someone where you are going and when you will be back is probably the best first aid kit you can carry. Everyone's kits are going to be different as where you ride and your personal health issues will also dictate what you carry. Obviously, riding in urban settings on short rides will be different than multi-day riding in back woods settings. Some common items might be the following:

    1. Trauma shears. These are a heavy duty set of medical scissors that can cut riding gear off.
    2. Maxi-pads or sanitary pads. Forget the trauma dressings. These things were designed to be sterile and absorb massive amounts of blood in a small package. They are the paramedic secret. We all carry them in our personal kits.
    3. Bandaging. This is the wrap that is going to keep the dressing (maxi-pad) in place and apply pressure to help stop bleeding. Some folks like to use ACE wraps because they can be applied loosely if necessary or tightly for bandaging or for sprains.
    4. Latex/ Vinyl gloves. You need to be able to protect yourself from bloodborne pathogens. Change them out a few times a year. They dry out and go bad. They are also great for keeping your hands clean if you need to do a quick messy repair on your bike. Your sunglasses will work fine for protecting your eyes.
    5. Over the counter meds. Benadryl, Immodium, Alleve, Ibuprofen, etc
    6. Mole skin for blisters.
    7. If you have had anaphylactic reactions then get with your doctor for an epinephrine pen or an epi-pen
    8. CPR mask. Don't get the big ones. They make some that are very small and are essentially a filter and a vinyl barrier.
    9. Waterless hand cleaner

    I don't carry the following, but many people do.

    10. Triangular bandage
    11. Quick clot powder
    12. tweezers
    13. bandaids
    14. Assorted trauma dressings.
    15. Burn jel
    16. Tape
    17. Permanent marker and paper
    18. SAM splints. We use them on our units at work and they work great. If you are going to carry a splint I can recommend this one.

    Don't get crazy with carrying tourniquets. You will likely never use them. If you do then your belt or a strap will work just fine. I have seen one successfully made by a guy for his girlfriend using a strap from a life jacket before we got on scene.

    Splints can be made from branches or other improvised objects. Bear in mind that the average response time in an urban setting for EMS is 7 to 8 minutes. Rural areas is maybe 20 minutes in most areas of the U.S. unless you are really getting out there. Proper treatment is just simply holding the fractured limb still until EMS arrives.

    Water for flushing wounds can be from your water pack.

    If you make a first aid kit so big that it gets in the way of being carried you will find that you will leave it at home and that of course defeats the purpose of having it in the first place.

    I have an article I wrote for a local BMW club last year on what to do after the accident happens. I posted it on my blog here: http://dirtmedic.wordpress.com/2013/05/31/after-the-accident/
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  7. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    If riding somewhere without cell signal, you may want something like a SPOT. It's good anyway to let somebody know where you're going and when you plan to be back in contact. Keep them informed if your plans change.

    Potable water is good to have. Stay hydrated out there, and be ready to hydrate somebody else. Heat stroke is no joke, and neither is hypothermia. You may want a space blanket and fire-starting ability too.

    Painkillers can be good to have as well, especially something that reduces swelling. Consult a physician or pharmacist about contraindications or dangers of the various painkillers available over the counter. You don't want to use something that could make treatment by EMTs or doctors more difficult later.

    KNOWLEDGE is probably the most important thing to take with you. It can keep you calm and clearer-thinking in bad situations. It can enable you to improvise. In the Marines, they taught us 4 lifesaving steps for traumas, and it's simple enough that even us jarheads can remember it...in order...decades later. It can also be applied to further first-aid education.

    Learn how to:

    - Start the breathing. (Establish airway, CPR, monitor vitals)

    - Stop the bleeding. (Direct pressure, elevate, indirect pressure, coagulants)

    - Protect the wound. (Immobilize patient unless movement is absolutely necessary, protect head/C-spine, clean and dress wounds, secure puncture objects in place without removal)

    - Treat for shock. (Basically, learn how to recognize the signs, unconstrict clothing/jewelry to aid breathing/circulation, make the person comfortable, check perfusion and neural function)



    Also learn about anaphylaxis, and you may want to carry an epi pen. If you have allergies or a medical condition, wear a notifier.

    I also carry a leatherman multi-tool. It's versatile for cutting strips of cloth for bandages, bindings, slings, and splints. It has pliers, scissors, corkscrew, knifeblades, and other functions.

    Neosporin, alcohol pads, or similar are good for scrapes and cuts.

    Edited to add: I've used maxipads on a wrist-slasher. Tampons can also stop nosebleeds. :lol3
    #7
  8. Hatch

    Hatch PAR OG

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    EXCELLENT post and article :clap

    my only critique is that the new CPR guidelines for non-healthcare providers is compressions only.

    here's the newest AHA corny video :lol3

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=2J-oSj5IkEY

    as for the med kit - like dirtmedic says don't go overboard. you don't need a corpsman carryalong field surgery kit, you're just looking to stop bleeding, benadryl for allergic reactions, maybe something like a hankerchief/triangle bandage (BTDT for a clavicle injury :deal)
    as was said the best thing is for people to know where you are. smartphones (cell + gps) are great to carry.
    The better directions you can give 911, the sooner definitive care will be for your buddy.
    #8
  9. TitaniumKaren

    TitaniumKaren Been here awhile

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    Thanks for all the great tips!:clap
    Definitely gives me a lead on what I should have and what is overkill. I guess its better to be prepared for an accident just in case. Definitely going to put this info to good use.:thumbup
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  10. ineptizoid

    ineptizoid I'm scared hold me

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    Nothing against med kits personally, but all ya really need is a bungee cord and a bandana. And a little resourcefulness.
    [​IMG]

    I do believe some narcotic pain relievers were called into action within a short time of this pic however.
    #10
  11. DirtMedic

    DirtMedic Intrepid Explorer

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    A couple of comments about AHA CPR guidelines. They are always going to be making changes. Just remember they are guidelines. Doing something is always better than doing nothing when it comes to CPR. If you are doing CPR then unfortunately the statistics say that person is likely dead anyhow. If it is trauma related it is just shy of a 100 percent chance they are dead. An AED greatly increases the likelihood of survival.

    When doing compressions bear in mind you are pressing on the two squishy things in the chest cavity... the heart of course to circulate blood, but also the lungs. Air is still exchanged when doing compressions. When you stop doing compressions the valves in the veins relax reducing blood pressure to zero. It takes 7 to 10 compressions to build pressure back up before blood starts circulating again which is why there was a change in protocol focusing on compressions. Even the best compressions will only circulate 25 percent of the heart's normal cardiac output so chest compressions are a less than ideal means of circulating blood anyhow.

    The other thing to remember is that you exhale 14% oxygen. Anything under 18% oxygen is considered an oxygen deficient atmosphere so when you stop compressions to administer rescue breaths you are bringing the blood pressure to zero to administer an oxygen deficient atmosphere to a dying patient. By giving continuous compressions the lungs are still exchanging oxygen at a normal 21% albeit at reduced tidal volume. You are also maintaining circulating blood pressures.

    The other thing that has been found is that there is often a delay in administering CPR just due to the gross factor. Nobody wants to do the mouth to mouth part. They anticipate a greater resuscitation rate with the new standards. Statistically, every minute without CPR is a 10% loss of patient survivability.

    Bottom line? Do something. It doesn't matter what standard you remember. It doesn't matter if you don't want to do mouth to mouth. Start pumping on that chest. NOW! Fast and deep! Switch rescuers often. If it isn't perfect that is ok, better to do something than you worry about doing something wrong and end up doing nothing. They are dead if you do nothing. They have a chance if you try. The other thing to know is that you will probably break some ribs. It feels gross. That is normal. Don't stop compressions when you feel the snap. Keep going. The surgeon will put the ribs back together later.

    Take a CPR class and a good First Aid class. I also highly recommend picking up the Boy Scout First Aid merit badge book. It is a really good basic first aid book for wilderness first aid. You can order it online or pick it up at the local scout shop. I hope this conversation is waste of everyone's time and is a theoretical conversation only, but it is better to be prepared and not need it than need it and not be prepared.
    #11
  12. Hatch

    Hatch PAR OG

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    Dude, dirtmedic puttin it down!

    Obviously you've been doin this a minute, everyone would do well to heed your advice. :thumb
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  13. ineptizoid

    ineptizoid I'm scared hold me

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    Indeed. He sounds like a bonafide adeptizoid. A good man to have around when yer in a bad way.:nod

    Also good to cancel out any ineptizoidery...gotta have a yin to the yang, ya know
    #13
  14. FL Pepper

    FL Pepper OMGWTFFTW

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    I always carry a small kit, just a few items like bandaids, neosporin, burn cream and a pair of scissors. Also a bottle opener.

    Guess which I use the most :freaky

    Anyone who knows me knows I am a big fan of the SPOT tracker.
    #14
  15. Vico1

    Vico1 The Maestro

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    Great info on here. Good comments from experienced folks.

    I carry minimal first aid stuff. My experience tells me the most common trail injuries are by far broken bones, and burns. Never been around any major lacerations so only carry Band-Aids.

    I do carry burn cream, and lots of various pain killers. Some strong enough to really make you forget you clavicle is broken or at least not care. I have been unfortunate enough to be on two rides where a fatality occurred. Nothing to be done in either case.

    I am also a big fan of SPOT. try and make sure someone in your group has one of these. At least you know you can get 911 to respond if its bad and your cell has no service.

    Last piece of advise if I may... dress for the crash at all times. It helps!
    #15
  16. Chicken Helmet

    Chicken Helmet I'm A Stumper™

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    If its for a KLR, just eliminate the duct tape and super glue. The bikes expendable.:deal
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  17. ZukiNoomin

    ZukiNoomin The Dude abides

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    I carry this:


    Tactical Trauma Kit


    [​IMG]

    because it seems like I come across more than my share of these:


    [​IMG]

    I was first on the scene to this crash, and helped extricate the driver.

    I am first aid and CPR certified, and I raised three athletic sons, so I know a little about first aid. :evil
    #17
  18. FLARider1

    FLARider1 Long timer

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    I guess I did good as a non medical person. I did a google search on motorcycle first aid kits and pretty much settled on what is found on your list of stuff, including the maxi pads!!! One thing I did add thats not on your list was a small bottle (maybe 6oz size) of saline solution, same stuff as you use for your contacts. gives you a small amount of flush water for a wound if needed.
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  19. DirtMedic

    DirtMedic Intrepid Explorer

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    I only skip the saline because I flush wounds with the water from my water pack. Anything really bad is going to require antibiotics and/or a tetanus shot anyhow. Like I said though, there is nothing written in stone with how you want to set your kit up. Some people are going to want to carry it for other reasons. If it works for you go with it.
    #19