Basic tool kit - what do you carry?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by _CJ, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. _CJ

    _CJ Retrogrouch

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    Been trying to get ready for some riding this summer. The tool kit on my DR350 is missing. What do you guys carry, or suggest somebody carry, and how do you carry it? Backpack? Saddle bag? In the factory tool carrier? Chain breaker and links? Tire levers and patch kit? Adjustable wrenches? Nothing but a cell phone?
    #1
  2. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    I never carry anything hard on my body, so never a fanny pack or back pack with tools. A camel back with water is good, for hydration and offers a little back protection too.

    This is my ADV touring kit, but if on a short ride, just the stuff in the tool roll, and in a fender bag-tubes, levers, patch kit.

    [​IMG]

    1) gloves,2) tire levers and axle nut tool,3) tire pump, 4) rope, 5) front wheel bearings, 6) oil filter and o-rings, 7) nuts/bolts/fuses, 8) two chain links, 9) spoke wrench & front axle nut tool, 10) patch kit, 11) wire ties, 12) electrical tape,

    13) tool roll, misc, allen wrenches, combination wrenches, sockets, pliers, air gauge, test light, crescent wrench, screw driver bits, carb jets

    14) Sven 15" saw and sheath, 15) wire, 16) 1/4" T wrench w/ bailing wire wraped, 17) chain tool, 18) hammer and epoxy, 19) jumper cables, 20) throttle and clutch cable, 21) coil, 22) front brake pads, 23) spark plug, 14T counter shaft sprocket, 24) 30mm counter shaft socket, and extension/adapters, 25) foot levers



    Not pictured are the front and rear inner tubes, small cans of chain lube and air filter oil, and 1st aid kit
    #2
  3. Evenflo76

    Evenflo76 Cheap and Easy

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    Look up CruzTools and Motion Pro.
    #3
  4. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer

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    Tools are bike and even ride specific for me. The best way to figure out what you need is to do your maintenance at home with your trail tool kit. You figure out pretty fast what to keep, what needs to be upgraded and what can be tossed.

    I have my LC4 down to just the tools that will fit in the stock tool kit. I add a fender or enduro bag as needed. If it is going to be a long ride in tough conditions I carry a Wolfman enduro bag for extra tools and spares on the rack plus a fender bag of tire stuff on the front.

    On my MXC all the tools I need will fit in the fender bag along my with my tire stuff and spare tubes. One of the joys of riding orange, especially two stroke orange, is that most of the fasteners are the same size so a couple of KTM tools are almost all you need.

    But I agree with One Less Harley about how to carry them. I never strap anything to my body that I don't want smashed into it. That is why I have the enduro and fender bags. I don't want my tools on my body when I crash.

    My tool kits are too KTM specific to bother posting. But this is my tool kit tire stuff minus the spare tubes, pump and two more levers in my fender bag. It is enough to get me home but still packs very small with everything in the pouch except the lever and axle wrench. I have learned to not travel without flat repair capapbility.

    [​IMG]
    #4
  5. MotoMind

    MotoMind Long timer

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    Make it a Sven 22" inch and it is a great part of any toolkit, even if you don't want to cut any wood. I took mine on a trip and never once sawed anything, but used it all the time. It is light and rigid and makes a fantastic quick jack if you put it under one of your footpegs:

    [​IMG]
    #5
  6. Idle

    Idle Been here awhile

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    Northern California
    6 point combo wrenches and 6 point sockets. 6,7,8,10,11,12,13 mm all in 1/4" drive
    26?mm Husaberg axle wrench
    Mac shorty 1/4" ratchet and two short extensions
    Motion Pro T handle 1/4" driver
    The larger Allen wrenches I cut down to 1" long and use with corresponding socket
    1-1/2,2,3,4,5 mm allen wrenches
    Mini linesman pliers Husaberg
    Plug wrench Husaberg
    Custom cut down bicycle hook spanner for head nut and shock preload ring

    All that goes in a vinyl bag on the tail

    Stashed on the bike is
    Tire spoons,Patch kit, tire plugs and tool, quick steel, small can of radiator stop leak, short piece of fuel line, spare bolts, zipties, valve stems, spare tailight bulb, gorilla tape

    In camelbak is
    Road Bike Frame pump, matches, lighters, flashlight, Small nalgene bottles of oil, clutch oil, tow rope, reading glasses, and thorough first aid kit with enough various pain killers to put an elephant to sleep.

    I can fix a flat or most any minor breakdown and get back to riding instead of waiting hours for help.
    #6
  7. Yooper_Bob

    Yooper_Bob Long timer

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    Da UP, eh! (Marquette, MI)
    I carry my cell phone, and cash!!!!
    #7
  8. marksbonneville

    marksbonneville Been here awhile

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    Arizona, Prescott more less.
    Great description and picture, thanks for sharing as I had a few items missing.
    #8
  9. plumber mike

    plumber mike Highdive Deepened

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    This, for me, is the only way to know what you need. No one here can answer the question specifically, but merely provide suggestions to get you close.

    Probably been said but these are a few things I like to carry that I've found few people do:

    A GOOD first aid kit w/suture kit- If I can't fix me I can't fix the bike.
    KY Jelly personal lubricant- You never know when you will get lucky on an ADV trip, but if you are married it just helps spoon tires:lol3. Keep it on the bike instead of the nightstand.
    Fluids for you and the bike.
    A flashlight or two_One mini-mag LED and one strap to my head kind, even for a day ride. When shit goes bad it usually gets dark shortly after.

    I get harrased sometimes for wieghing my bike down needlessly, but If I use it once then I'm glad I had it....plus I packed my 400# shitbox beemer everywhere you took your 250# KTM:deal

    There's sooo much more I'm forgetting, but that why there are so many of us.

    Safe travels,

    Mike
    #9
  10. Cigar Mike

    Cigar Mike Too Old and Too Slow

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    I put the tools I carry based on what can go wrong and do I have what I need to fix it. Or survive until help can reach me.

    Mechanical

    Flats
    Tire irons
    Second wind tire pump
    !2v compressor
    Patches
    Tubes
    Lubricant
    Valve tool
    Tire gauge

    Drive
    Chain breaker, Motion Pro
    Extra master links
    Small section of chain
    Tow rope

    Missing or loose bolts
    Wrenches as required
    Extra bolts, nuts and washers
    Tie wire
    zip ties

    Electrical
    Fuses
    Wire
    Tape
    Spark plugs
    CDI, one bike is a XR650L
    Leatherman type tool

    Damage to case, oil containment.
    JB Weld, the putty type. Can patch large holes easily and is mixed in your hands.

    Personal

    First Aid Kit
    Fire starting
    Shelter, Emergency sleeping bag
    Food, anything from Beef Jerky to MREs
    Water, Bladder in flight vest
    Walk out shoes
    Spot Tracker
    Cell
    Walkie Talkie
    Flashlight
    cap light
    Hatchet
    Shovel

    I carry everything on the bike some where except most of the tire repair stuff. I carry that in my flight vest. The vest carries the radio, phone, knife, Co2, balacava, warm or cool weather gloves, cigars, lighter, tire irons, and a front tube. Now maybe most would think all this stuff is not basic. It is for me. It may be different for me becasue my better half is my ridng partner

    I do carry more than this but this is the basic stuff.:rofl

    Carry what ever you feel comfortable with. But think of what can go wrong according to the riding you do. If I rode in a large group it would be different. But I don't and I won't.
    #10
  11. plumber mike

    plumber mike Highdive Deepened

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    ...and what he said too. Unless someone else posted:D

    Also, I like to seperate my personal survival gear from the bike fixin stuff. If I do have to leave the bike I still want water, powerbars, and first aid stuff on my back.
    #11
  12. plumber mike

    plumber mike Highdive Deepened

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    Cigar Mike posted...nothing can prepare you for the Saudi Aurora. Smokey Hill out to Parker is bad enough.

    I have no expierience in zombie preparation:rofl
    #12
  13. Seavoyage

    Seavoyage Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
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    San Francisco

    I'm a minimalist on my DR250. All you need is the basic tools to do the following tasks in the middle of nowhere:


    1. Patch a flat tire tube: (3 tire irons, a small MotionPro T-6 trail bead buddy, valve core removal (caps on each valve + spare valve core), hand pump (I use a Mini Versair), a few Co2 cartridges, tire pressure gauge (pencil type), talcum powder (optional), 21" tire tube which can also be used on the rear. Small patch kit ($2 at bicycle shop). Combination wrench to remove wheels on DR350 are 17mm (front axle and carburetor float bowl drain plug), 24mm (rear axle)...Tusk has this wrench for $12. You'll need a 10mm socket for the front axle retaining bolts, and a 12mm for the brake caliper mounting bolts.
    2. Clear a drowned engine: Spark plug wrench (14mm), spare plugs already gapped.
    3. Get a tow: Tow strap (a single ratchet straps is more useful for me)
    4. Siphon fuel: 6' Plastic tubing that matches your fuel lines.
    5. Seal a cracked side case: JB weld or Metal putty.
    6. Repair a broken chain: 520 chain links with master links, and small chain breaker tool.
    7. Replace a broken clutch or throttle cable: Spare clutch cable. You can also use a bicycle brake cable which can be used for the throttle or clutch. (Taped parallel to the existing cables.)
    8. Secure anything that may fall off. Loctite (blue/red) everything, then carry zipties (taped to front forks), ductape (wrapped around wrenches), electric tape (wrapped around wrenches), safety wire (wound around seat subframe tube).

    A basic multi-tool: Leatherman Crunch (with a vice grip which can be used as a shift lever) and a MotionPro Tool Metric The 8mm, 10mm and 12mm sockets will get the DR350 sidepanels, fuel tank, and seats off to access everything .

    Everything fits in a Moose Racing Fender bag which stays on the bike at all times. The moment you remove it from the bike, you'll forget it!


    Survival kit: (Stays on your body at all times)

    3L Water (Camelback "Hydrate or Die!")) + purification tablets or waterpurifier.


    Leave a route map in your vehicle and with friends/family before each trip. USCG call this a 'float plan'. On that topic hope yor 'estate' is in order: Will, Power of Attorney and 'Blood Chit'.

    +1 on shoes!

    +1 on no hard objects on your body.

    The only first aid items that are critical are: (the little bandaid/neosporin/aspirin kits won't save you)

    • A nasopharangeal airway to keep airway open (No.. it's for the lother guy. Good luck keeping uour own airway open)
    • 2 windlass tourniquets and Quickclot to keep from bleeding out (read compound fracture, impaled object, or large laceration)
    • Sam Splint to stabilize a fracture (can also use your tire irons and duct tape) or a C-collar. I place the Sam Splint for support in a fanny pack to make it a kidney belt.
    • Bandana/cravat
    I don't recommend traveling alone... use the buddy system, just like evey other professional organization (SCUBA, Military, Outward Bound). Since you got a buddy, cross load... you only need one of the heavy stuff between the two or more of you.
    #13
  14. thorinoakenshield

    thorinoakenshield ya mo be there

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    What do you do to pack your tire tubes down?
    Do you just take patches?
    :ear
    My tire tubes are like friggin' bricks.
    I hate hauling them around.
    #14
  15. Cigar Mike

    Cigar Mike Too Old and Too Slow

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    Centennial, Co
    I do like your list and had forgotten I carry many of the items on your list that I did not list. One little tool that has been a welcome addition is a small pair of vice grips. They come in handy as designed and can also be used as a shift lever. A towel comes in handy to keep things off the ground and clean up after repairs.

    Mike
    #15
  16. Cigar Mike

    Cigar Mike Too Old and Too Slow

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    I run heavy duty tubes but carry standard tubes for trail side repairs. They pack up pretty small. I used to carry only a front but when I put the saddle bags on the bike it was not much more to carry a rear also. Between our two bikes I carry three tubes. Two fronts and a rear. When I get home I install another heavy tube and the light tube goes back as the spare. It is much easier to install a standard tube in the field.

    Be very sure that you have indentified the casue of the flat. It is a bummer to have two causes and only fnd one and get a flat right after the replacing the tube.

    Mike
    #16
  17. thorinoakenshield

    thorinoakenshield ya mo be there

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    Ah...I see...good idea! I never thought of just having regular tubes as spares. I usually run with HD tubes as I have a bunch of those lying around for spares. They're kinda heavy and take too much space.

    If you don't mind...is there a significant difference in the packed size of regular tubes? Roughly what is the size? (Sorry..no good deed goes unpunished...)
    #17
  18. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    Looks like a good tool kit set up for a two year round the world trip! IMHO, not only is Greatdog's advice posted below critical ... but also critical is good PREP. Every bike and every ride is different. So prepare for the ride your doing and bring tools specific to that bike, taking into account the sort of ride your doing, length of trip ... and of course the reliability of your bike and how much you trust it. :D

    But prepping the bike and knowing it well means lots can be left behind. I don't bring cables as mine last 4 or 5 years and I pay attention to them. I do bring a master link ... mostly for friends as my chains last 25,000 miles. Starting with new or near new components means spares are not needed. (new battery, new chain/sprockets/new tubes/tires) For very long, multi year travel things are different but most times on month long trips I don't carry many spares other than tubes and a spare front sprocket for gearing changes. I don't bring a spoke wrench cause my spokes never loosen, No coils or CDI's or other elec. components. Some things you just have to trust!

    One thing I haven't seen mentioned is a spare Nut & Bolt kit. My buddies are usually the beneficiaries of this. My Spares kit is custom to the bike I'm riding and contains various OEM sizes, washers, springs, spacers and other weird things that I imagine might be needed some Cold Day In Hell! :lol3

    Packing light is an Art. I'm still learning ... but riding dual sports has accelerated the learning curve. :evil
    #18
  19. FinlandThumper

    FinlandThumper Has Cake/Eats it Too Super Moderator

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    Do a search on YouTube for BMW f650 tools and spares kit. A user did an excellent video overview there. Of course some of the things are specific to the BMW, but you will get some great ideas from that video.
    #19
  20. Cigar Mike

    Cigar Mike Too Old and Too Slow

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    Item #7 in the post you quoted and I listed them in my post as well. But using your logic why carry them at all? Just make sure everything is properly torqued and loctited

    Like I said before, carry what you are comfortable with for the type of riding you do.

    Mike
    #20