bath vent fan experience?

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by vwboomer, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. vwboomer

    vwboomer Buffoon

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    Thanks for the link. I wasn't able to find a local retailer so that seems like the best option.

    That's the type I will go with. a screen/spring loaded door will keep critters out and drafts down

    The fan has one built in. between that and one on the roof it should be pretty well sealed.

    appreciate the advice on this. Looks like I"m going ot have to move on this in the next week or two.
    I very rarely shower at home, but even so you can see the drips on the walls. The house was built in 1947 and when I moved in 4 years ago that was tops on my list :D
    #21
  2. dan-c

    dan-c Back

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    I don't think it's a good idea to have a dimmer on an ac motor unless it's made for it. IIRC it's a fire hazard from the heat generated by low voltage to the motor.
    #22
  3. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    It's called out in the specs. There are several options on this unit. High speed only, low speed only, two speed (with a spdt switch) or variable speed. They do not call for a PWM, a rheostat is fine. From the literature:

    Models 100, 100x and 125 ​
    :

    Single-phase, 120V 60Hz, shaded pole induction asynchronous motor in die cast aluminum. All
    motors include direct two speed connection and are also suitable for voltage speed control.
    • Class ll electrical insulation (model 100) & Class l (models 100x and 125)
    • IP 44 Protection
    • Class B Motor Insulation
    • Safety auto reset Thermal Overload Protection (fuse type)
    • Self-lubricating sleeve bearings.​
    • Suitable for working airstreams up to 104° F (40°C).

    I dont' remember if I have an "X" or not. The X has a self-resetting breaker, instead of a fuse.
    #23
  4. McB

    McB Joe 40 ouncer

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    Idyllic scene. Wife, on a lovely late spring morning when the sun is hitting and the temps are rising, takes her coffee and paper out to the porch, sits back comfortably with her feet up, listening to the birds singing, when out of nowhere...........
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  5. Dave in Wi

    Dave in Wi Long timer

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    #25
  6. DriveShaft

    DriveShaft Long timer

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    wow...I'm coming to you for specs when I redo the house! That is one fancy-ass fan you got there! :)
    #26
  7. BerndM

    BerndM Shiftless One

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    Years ago when I replaced the ceiling fan in my smaller bathroom I did quite a bit of reading on the internet. I was interested in one in particular because it claimed it was almost silent. Nice. I don't remember why I didn't end up with that but the thing is, for that unit, the fan itself was actually mounted to the roof or wall, NOT in the ceiling, so the sound level was waaaayyyy lower.
    I'm sure a Google will turn it up for you.
    #27
  8. MrBob

    MrBob Certified Geezer

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    As others have mentioned, spend a few bucks on a good fan. Use rigid vent pipe rather than the expandable for much greater efficiency and longer life.
    Use a flapper vent to keep cold drafts out.
    Use a flat bar to pop the nails on the shingles in the area where the hole will be cut and than weave the shingles back into place around the collar you install. You'll need minimal goop to seal the nail heads and around the cutout and that will do it. A laser pointer or pendulum will help you line things up.
    Do not, like one dumbass I know, wire your fan to a GFI relay circuit because you'll trip it every time you hit the switch. But I never did it again.
    #28
  9. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    I would add that you want to mark your vent location from inside the attic so you don't accidentally put your hole saw through a rafter. I drilled a small hole from the inside, then used the hole saw from the outside. I suppose you could do the whole thing from the inside, but I wanted to watch the felt when the saw hit it to make sure it cut, rather than tore.
    #29
  10. soyanarchisto

    soyanarchisto Long timer

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    I replaced my bathroom vent recently. Only thing I can add is make sure you turn the motherfucking breaker off before you crawl into the attic.

    Don't ask me why.
    #30
  11. Nailhead

    Nailhead Free at last!

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    Don't be leery of cutting a ducting hole through asphalt shingles-- just use a hook blade in a utility knife to cut what you need out of the shingle(s) THEN use a hole saw to cut the roof deck. I have always used a jig or recip saw myself because I hate using large hole saws.

    Lap the uphill shingle over the duct flashing, lap the downhill one underneath, and use sealant under the flashing, the uphill shingle at the cutout, and anywhere you might have pried that shingle loose from one underneath. Screw the flashing down with gasketed screws and that should do it. I seal around the screw heads also, because it's too easy to crush those little rubber gaskets.

    That's how I do it.
    #31
  12. vwboomer

    vwboomer Buffoon

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    I can't use a wall vent due to brick siding.

    I figured to drill a pilot hole from the inside, stick a piece of wire through it and find it on the roof. I will try to remove a couple shingles, but they are getting pretty fragile.

    I have zero idea what breaker the bathroom is on. probably two. things might have made sense with the old fuse box, but whenever it was converted to breakers there seems to be no reason as to what is fed off each breaker :huh
    nothing like splicing into 65 year old wires :D

    the wires go up to the attic from the basement for every thing. I'm not sure where exactly but shouldn't be too difficult to find. maybe i can lay that 12" of insulation that is still in the bags up there. for 3 years :lol3
    #32
  13. Nailhead

    Nailhead Free at last!

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    Don't remove any-- just gently pry the uphill one(s) up with a sharp(ish) pry bar or restorer's cat's paw. Wait for a warm (not hot) day so the shingles are more flexible.
    #33
  14. DriveShaft

    DriveShaft Long timer

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    In an old house, a useful piece of kit is a circuit tracer, or a toner. They're pretty affordable these days, and sure as hell beat the redneck ways of analysis. :)

    We went through the brick to get a 240v subpanel on the exterior of the house. There's definitely a chance of busting it up, if you rush it, but it's doable.
    #34
  15. Dave in Wi

    Dave in Wi Long timer

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    I don't want to hijack your thread, but thought I'd put this out there. I aborted my bath fan replacement Saturday after I opened the box and got a look at the fan. The bottom of the housing has a flange on it, which means I'd have to cut the hole in the drywall ceiling oversized to get the fan in from above. It seems the fan is designed for new construction, to be installed before the drywall is in place. It's quite possible I'm over thinking this, but I'd rather not have to cut the hole oversized and have to seal up the perimeter with expanding foam. I'm going to stop in the stores this week and take a closer look at what they've got. And see if they have a good fan that might work better for existing construction.
    #35
  16. DriveShaft

    DriveShaft Long timer

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    Generally, yes, if the old one has the flanges, it was designed to be installed before the sheetrock goes up.

    And inside, it's very modular, so if your heater craps out, or your fan is louder than a chevy, or goes tits up, or if the lens just starts to turn yellow & crappy, you just call them up for a replacement module, and install it in the existing shell.

    But retrofit fans do exist with alternate means of affixing a frame. It's not so bad.
    #36
  17. Dave in Wi

    Dave in Wi Long timer

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    My old fan is very undersized for the size of the bathroom, it should be about 110 cfm and the one that's there is 40 or 50. This leads to way too much humidity especially in the winter, with lots of condensation on the windows. The existing g fan has about an 8 inch square cutout, the 100 cfm + fans are all larger.
    #37
  18. Nailhead

    Nailhead Free at last!

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    Cut the flange off with tin snips & screw the fan to a joist from the inside with some drywall screws. I had the same problem with the vent fan I bought compounded by having to remove the wiring enclosure and reinstalling it once I mounted the unit.
    #38
  19. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    That's another advantage to remote fans. My ceiling opening is now a 4" round cutout. I offset it to the side so if someone wants to add a Solatube later, there's nothing in the way in the middle of the ceiling.
    #39
  20. Dave in Wi

    Dave in Wi Long timer

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    Now there is a thought. If I can't buy one without flanges, I can do thAt.
    #40