beginer question ,,advise needed.

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by gopro, Jan 13, 2018 at 5:02 PM.

  1. gopro

    gopro n00b

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    been lurking here since 2012 ,
    always wanted to get me a triumph motorcycle,
    I have never had a motorcycle before, what would be the wise way to enter into
    motorcycles?

    I was thinking in getting a suzuki tu250, take clases, then later get triumph t100

    please advise what will be better in you pro's opinion.

    thank you !
    #1
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  2. KansasKawboy

    KansasKawboy KK

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    Sounds like a good plan. The TU250 is a good starter bike, very easy to ride.
    #2
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  3. James.A

    James.A ILL Airmarshal

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    One thing to consider is the right side shift lever on vintage triumphs. If you are considering a modern Triumph, the few owners I know like them.

    It is a very good idea to start out on a low displacement Japanese bike. Be advised, a modern 250 Japanese bike can run with my 750 BMW. The Japanese bikes are lighter in weight and, as such, should be more friendly to a new rider.

    Try to find an MSF beginning rider course. It is my understanding that many Harley-Davidson dealers offer a class called the Harley riding Academy. Many states offer MSF classes at some state universities as well. You will be taught how to ride a lightweight bike in a parking lot. That is a huge benefit as a new rider.
    #3
  4. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    I get asked about getting into motorcycles all the time. I tell all novices the same thing. Get the license before you buy a motorcycle. Where I live, Maryland, there are classes run by a nation wide organization, MSF, Motorcycle Safety Foundation, I think, specifically tailored to helping the novice rider get the skills to ride a motorcycle and after taking, and passing the beginners course you get a piece of paper to take to the DMV and get a motorcycle license.

    Maybe you already have the ticket? Thought I would mention this in case you don't.
    #4
  5. Boomer343

    Boomer343 Been here awhile

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    If a vintage Triumph had been my first bike I would have given up on motorcycling..... even if it would have been new at the time. Hell even with lots of experience I cursed the 70 Bonneville I had.

    On the other hand the last couple of CB350's I've resurrected have been bought by 20 somethings who are fresh into motorcycling. I seriously suggest to them to reconsider buying vintage motorcycles. No talking them out of it.

    Ride a reliable, safe bike and really decide if it is your thing to be on the road with the rest of us addicts before dipping your toes into the vintage waters.
    #5
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  6. sparkingdogg

    sparkingdogg Prisoner In Disguise

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    Crashing in dirt hurts less. Small dirt bikes are easy to ride. Be safe and have fun!
    #6
  7. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    DO NOT follow my example. Do this instead.

    Take a beginner dirt course. Learning to ride in the loose gives you a huge advantage on the street. Then take the BRC. Grin like a madman.
    Get a small displacement Dual Sport or Standard road bike ( TU 250 is a good one ) ride very day practical. Grin like a madman.

    About Triumphs.
    Vintage Triumphs are not practical daily rides unless your wealthy or a mechanical savant.
    Newer Triumphs are the next generation and way better daily rides for today's world.

    Motorcycle is like another thing that describes you on your license like hair color or eye color. An invisible stamp on your soul. Riding changes you in subtle and sometimes not subtle ways. You will see things and see things in the ways that drivers and pedestrians never will.

    Welcome to the asylum.
    #7
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  8. James.A

    James.A ILL Airmarshal

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    "...Motorcycle is like another thing that describes you on your license like hair color or eye color. An invisible stamp on your soul. Riding changes you in subtle and sometimes not subtle ways. You will see things and see things in the ways that drivers and pedestrians never will..."

    Gospel truth quoted here.
    #8
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  9. GBen

    GBen Been here awhile

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    I would ask yourself if you have an aptitude for riding a motorcycle and why you want to ride one in the first place. Most people learn to ride a bicycle when they are kids, but just a small percentage of them have an aptitude for it that lets them be fearless and calm and level-headed in all situations including going at high-speed, jumping and emergency situations where someone without an aptitude would be seriously inured. Most people who have gotten into motorcycling since the 1980s have not done it because it is part of who they are, but part of some ideal they want to participate in for social reasons or for an ego boost, these are the people who end up maimed or killed, the poser who wants to be a "biker" then crashes off the road on a fast turn or runs into an automobile. I worked with one kid who lost his leg from the knee down his first time out on the street, another who was killed by someone who ran through a stop-sign and hit him broadside, another who's bike was totalled when he was stopped at a light and someone ran into his rear wheel, and I dated a girl who is in jail right now because driving drunk she ran into the back of a Harley that was sitting at a light and killed it's rider. So that is it, if you can get on a motorcycle and be fearless while you weave through traffic and you have the natural ability to spot life-threatening situations and avoid them before you are caught in them then go for it, but if you are a hipster looking to participate in the fashion-trend that motorcycling in general has become since 1980 then look for a different fashion trend to participate in, unless you are so needy that it is worth risking your life for a remedy. Statistically riding a motorcycle on the street is the most dangerous transportation there is period...
    #9
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  10. Caesars_ghost

    Caesars_ghost Vertical twin

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    Great idea. Motorcycles are fun (that's like saying women are interesting, kind of the understatement of the century) and Triumphs, new or old, are good bikes.

    Take the MSF course, get a helmet, gloves, and jacket, and get a TU250, they're reliable, good looking, sweet-running bikes, and make enough power for everyday around town riding. Good backup if you get a vintage Triumph down the road and it finds itself indisposed some fine day.
    #10
  11. JCool

    JCool Long timer

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    And you can always sell a non running Triumph at a loss. :lol3
    #11
  12. riggpigg

    riggpigg Known,but not famous

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    TU 250 is an excellent first bike. Fuel injected single cylinder and light easy to ride. Take all the safety courses you possibly can. Learn and gain experience on the 250. Then if a vintage triumph is still desired, I might suggest a later model, say a 2003 to 2007 carbed T-100 Bonneville. They have the classic look and are MUCH more dependable, and just an all round better machine. They are easily capable of all day riding at freeway speeds, economical to run and there are accessories aplenty available such as bags/panniers, windscreens, seats, etc. Sounds like you are on your way......good luck.
    #12
  13. bodine003

    bodine003 Been here awhile

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    As some have recommended. A used enduro to learn/play on. Take the MSF course gets U parking lot certified. Plenty of used nice Hinkley Bonnys out there. I have an 03 bought new and love it. Vintage brits are not for new riders. They are fine motorbikes when sorted and $$$$$ spent. That would be for down the road. Also consider the modern Ducati scrambler & Guzzi 750's Good Luck!!!!
    #13
  14. gopro

    gopro n00b

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    all points taken, thanks.

    I realized that I really like to ride a motorcycle, the only experience I have is on scooter rentals everytime I go to a beach vacations.

    I do realize also that I can not afford being injured at this point in my life. "to many responsibilities "
    will put it in the back burner for now .
    thank you !
    #14
  15. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

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    Since you are taking your lifes' responsibilities seriously, treat motorcycling the same way.
    Take the course.
    Instead of us telling you what to do, you be able to chart your own course.
    Some are capable of riding, some are not!
    #15
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  16. gopro

    gopro n00b

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    oh yes offcourse ,, will take the course then later decide if to move forward and when .
    I know and understand risks on any hobby,, I am an offshore fisherman and very experienced, will not encourage any begginer to do what I do with first reaserching and training.

    thats why I am am in the reaserch training phase of motorcycles,, and will not jump to buy anything and will take some advise from this thread and do it.
    #16
  17. gopro

    gopro n00b

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    oh another thing. I dont like noise motorcycles, dont like harley style , more like triumph style motorcycles not necessarily triumph.
    I like a quiet, relaxing ride maybe in a Colorado landcape. , dont like or need speed also.

    been looking at Zero electric also , nice but to modern look guess I am picky.

    been searching for years for a 1966 honda 160 scrambler to restore ,but havnt had the luck
    #17
  18. Boomer343

    Boomer343 Been here awhile

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    been searching for years for a 1966 honda 160 scrambler to restore ,but havnt had the luck[/QUOTE]

    Sign up over at hondatwins.net they pop up on the for sale board once in awhile. Had one myself that I bought in 1972 I believe. Sold it in 79. Another one has yet to cross my path.
    #18
  19. jeep44

    jeep44 junk collector

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    I'm sure glad the 'net was not invented back when I got my first Triumph. I didn't have anonymous people giving me bad advise, or trying to persuade me not to do something I was interested in. I just bought that old '70 650 Triumph for $50 from a guy at work, without knowing a thing about them, and dragged the basket case home in my car. It started me on a lifetime hobby of fooling around with old motorcycles, and eventually, I rebuilt that Triumph, got it running, and kept refining it and correcting my mistakes as I learned more and more about them. I built it into a reliable, dependable motorcycle, rode it everywhere, rode it to work, and years later, traded it for another bike I wanted. My advice is, if you want an old Triumph, just do it, and buy one.
    #19
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  20. Ibraz

    Ibraz Adventurer

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    As some already said, abolutely take a riding class.

    Awareness is also VERY important, and some things cannot be learned by driving a car. Watch a LOT of motorcycle videos as soon as you can.
    As a car driver, you (hopefully) have developped a sense of "prediction" of what the traffic around you is going to do, but on the bike, a lot more can happen and you can start training your brain with close calls compilations, crash compilations etc etc...

    It'll help you detect dangerous situations:

    -Gap in traffic = potential vehicle or pedestrian crossing with no visibility
    -Look AHEAD and keep your distances with vehicles in front
    -Dont ride behind semis of big vehicles you can't see through, if impossible, increase following distance.
    -Don't speed in town.
    -Sudden decisions, neglected shoulder checks, and impulsive moves WILL put you in bad situations.
    -Make your self visible by choosing a good lane position and speed depending on circonstances.
    -CHECK YOUR MIRRORS! Cagers WILL rear end you, always have an escape path and enough space between you and the car stopped in front.
    -Do not assume another vehicle will stop when you have right of way.
    -Corner exit is the place to be fast. Corner entry will bite you hard if you're too optimistic or jerky with your controls.
    -Prepare for the turn BEFORE the turn, slow down, downshift, scratch you nose, do whatever you want, but avoid doing it in a turn.

    There's a lot more to learn, and I too am a fairly new rider with only a few thousand miles on the bike, but these helped a lot.

    Note on that, I spent almost a year chosing a bike and must have said the exact same sentence a hundred times... First ride on the bike, few city miles, then exited the first (no traffic) freeway access ramp redlining second, third and fourth gear. Seems like some people change when they are on a bike. Keep calm and remember there's a time and place to do goofy things and it's better be alive for the next one.

    On a side note, a motorcycle's power can sometimes give you an advantage, and I think that something up to around 75 horsepower is adequate for a beginner. Let's say that despite your situational awareness and anticipation, you find yourself followed closely by a car and see another one starting to swerve in your lane aiming directly at you.

    Slow bike options:
    -Brake (your life depends on the cager behind)
    -Swerve (your life depends on the presence of vehicles in the lane next to you

    Reasonably powerfull bike options:
    -Brake (Cager behind may be texting, are you in luck today?)
    -Swerve (Meh, maybe that sedan will hurt less than a pick up truck)
    -Accelerate: you see where you're going, and rely less on uncertain things.

    So always try to keep on roads where your bike is a bit responsive and get out of situations like heavy traffic + maxed out bike.

    Finally, on the triumph thing: I REALLY liked the bonneville I rode for 200km last year except for one thing: the seat WILL make your behind bleed after an hour.
    And if you can find a bike that you like but you don't mind scratching a bit it will be a great first one (cheap well maintained reliable bike with just the right amount of personnality to be interesting to you but not drive the prices too high on used market).
    #20