BergDonk's DR650

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by BergDonk, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. DRjoe

    DRjoe Long timer

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    I've been thinking about putting a double row angular bearing in my cush hub as well.
    I have a new toy arriving soon that will allow me to make the required mods to the hub so that a double row can be used
  2. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    The fit is such that you can just slide a lubricated bearing in with your hands on the 'new' hub, the original damaged one needs some pressure, and it still allowed the bearing to spin. This was only with the new double roller, the stock bearings did not spin. It wasn't bad, but there was evidence.

    I have some Loctite 641 Retaining Compund and that's what I'll use on both of them.

    I head off next month with AdventureXR650, rowdy_im and a few other reprobates and expect to do 12-13,000 kms over June/July to the centre and Kimberly and don't want this playing up in the middle of the Simpson. I planned to take some spare bearings and didn't want to use retaining compound as it makes a trail side replacement harder. We have 4wd support for some of the trip, so carrying the spare hub should be OK, so thats why I'll now fix both of them with retaining compound. FWIW, the replacement hub was labelled for a 1990 DR250 and there are some subtle differences in the casting. A new die perhaps? Also, when drilling the holes for the screws for the seal retainer the alloy in the new old hub seemed harder? Dimensionally its identical.

    In the picture above you can see that the seal on the RHS sits a bit proud of the hub. This is because of the 6.6 mm wider double row bearing. The seals are 7 mm wide and I ground down the back of the seal to get rid of the taper. They are now about 6.5 mm wide and fit into the hub about 3 mm leaving 3.5 mm exposed. The nylon stepped washer clamps down over the seal to hold it abit better and protects it a bit too. The test ride was without the seal as I wasn't confident that it's stay put with only 3 mm to grip.

    The spacer on the left is the original, and the one on the right is my new one. Its stepped down to fit into the bearing and provide some additional support. The second step is for the seal, and the large diameter is just what I started with, 40 mm bar, and means the lip of the seal is better protected than otherwise, maybe.

    What mod to the hub do you plan Joe? The only change I had to make was a new spacer to allow for the wider bearing which just takes up the space the seal normally does. Adding the seal just makes me feel better, and may not really make any real difference, dunno.

    Steve
  3. Dirt McGirt

    Dirt McGirt Adventurer

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    Jun 7, 2007
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    50
    Yo Donk, where did you get that counter shaft sprocket cover? That's a trick little detail. I never really liked the stock one, but still use it because it's serviceable. Thanks bro Dirt
  4. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    I made it up myself after the VSM replacement broke, fatigue failure on the creases on the mounting tabs, perhaps facilitated by a little chain contact.

    I had a piece of 10 mm alumimium plate lying about that forms the basis. I cut the inner circular shape with a hole saw and then trimmed it up with an angle grinder with an aluminum cutting disc. Put some spacers on the main bolts to centre it on the sprocket, and then had a bit of scrap to make the cover. Took a few hours and is nice and strong and hasn't broken yet.

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=15411000&postcount=117

    Steve
  5. Dirt McGirt

    Dirt McGirt Adventurer

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    You've inspired me, and for once I have all the tools to do something from start to finish. Now I'm gonna keep my peepers on for the right piece of alum stock. Thanks good idea, Dirt
  6. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    Go for it :thumb

    Also from memory, the spacer off the case was a bit of sheet that I screwed to the 10 mm plate so its captive.
  7. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    Having the inside of the hubb Bead blasted should create a bit more interference in the fit
  8. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    Yep.

    Just did the Loctite thing for the time being and will do a few hundred kms tomorrow and see how it goes using the new/old hub.

    Steve
  9. DRjoe

    DRjoe Long timer

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    The bearing I had found was deeper than yours so I was going to leave the seal and outside spacer stock and then go inwards with the bearing and make a new inner spacer.
    But after seeing your mod I'll probably just get the same bearing you got and then do the same as you with the spacer and seal.

    Its always nice when someone else try's out a mod first.

    cheers

    joe

  10. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    The thing that appeals to me about the bearing going 'out' is that its more in line with the sprocket and reduces the twisting loads applied from chain pull which I think is an issue. And the double row helps to resist the twist too.

    My machinist/engineer mate felt that there wasn't really enough meat in the hub to sleeve it properly. I was thinking a steel sleeve about 1 mm thick with a thicker boss on the outside to take the seal. I thought I'd be up for making the sleeve, but my lathe won't take the hub to bore it so I'd have needed his assistance for that. Handy having an expert for a neighbour :evil

    I'm hoping its sorted now, got some kms to do soon and am running out of time...

    Steve
  11. Bushmechanic

    Bushmechanic Adventurer

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    Hi Steve,

    My wife allways looks at me funny if I tell her my bike is ready to go.. shes right a good bike project is never really finished :)

    Ive seen bad die casting of bearing housing bores in cr500s cases, clutch side gearbox bearings with play.. nasty!

    I like the 641 its good stuff and you can fix the bike on the road with bearings from a shop, if it doesn't work out in the long term though you could probably bore the hub +0.5mm then grind down the OD of the bearing a tad and run a sleeve over it ?
  12. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    Ahhhh Bushie, she is a wise one, hang on to her. Nothing is ever finished, everything is only ever transitory.......

    Steve
  13. nolana

    nolana what's that skip?

    Joined:
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    She is good indeed bushie. Wonder if my boss would have the same appreciation for this entirely sound philosphical approach....

    Got to get out before you head off Steve, maybe a sneaky trip during the week. Have managed to drag Smithi back home for a second dose of Snowy too, so you'll need to put the billy on if we can't make a ride!
  14. rowdy_im

    rowdy_im KTM 625 Snowy Mountains

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    I hope Smithi still has a bike with knobs on it ,my sources have it that he has been spending time on the tar

    Steve has always got time in retirement land unlike some of us that still need to slave away in Snowy land

    cheers
    Scott:wink:
  15. nolana

    nolana what's that skip?

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    Your sources are accurate Scott, he's shod only with very smooth rubber. I've already gone to work on him though and he has plans hatching to correct the situation as I type!
  16. rowdy_im

    rowdy_im KTM 625 Snowy Mountains

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    good to hear

    wouldn,t want the enviroment to miss out on a set of nobbies carving up this great land of ours:evil


    cheers
    Scott
  17. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    I got asked about the fuel plumbing. I got a servicable filter from ebay:
    http://shop.ebay.com.au/i.html?_nkw=5%2F16+FILTER+harley&_sacat=0&_odkw=5%2F16+FILTER&_osacat=0&_trksid=p3286.c0.m270.l1313

    After a couple of goes, its now set it up so the lines either go up to a fuel tap, or the carb, so no air traps and blockages at low fuel levels which happens with the Safari at low levels. All plumbing is 8 mm or 5/16 to reduce head loss and the u turn at the bottom of the filter is a piece of copper tube carefully bent with a spring bender. All other filters removed, ie from inside the fuel taps, and if I still had the BST40, from it too. The FCR has a rotating inlet pipe so all angles are possible. With a horizontal filter it looks tidier, but the filter gets air blockages. If the fuel stops flowing, there is only one filter to check. Works good now.

    [​IMG]
  18. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    I will have to try a loop down from my T join and back up to the carb inlet. Mine sucks air and will not go to reserve without getting an airlock. My plumbing is basically horizontal at present. Thanks for posting the "fix"
  19. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    I love heated grips, and it was one of the first things I did to the DR after I got it. The 2 speed type that wrap around the bar and then you fit normal grips over the top in this case. Unfortunately after playing with the wiring of my lights, GPS, power extras and the forks on and off a few times, the resistor that is switched into the circuit for the low heat setting broke. It's been suggested a more efficient way to wire up the grips would be to have them in series for the low setting rather in parallel with the series resistor. I thought this was a good idea, thanks Ash, and came up with the following circuit which uses a DPDT centre off rather than the stock SPDT centre off.

    No heat loss from the restistor, so more watts for something else on low setting, and one less thing to break again.

    FWIW

    [​IMG]

    Steve
  20. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    The main thing is that there are no high spots that do not go directly to the carb or a tap. Air is 'sticky' and if a bubble forms it'll stick to the side of the rubber hose. When the fuel level is low, and in the Safari it gets very low relative to the carb float bowel, there is not enough pressure to break the air bubble stiction, so the idea is to eliminate anywhere a bubble can form, and the low bits under the carb fuel intake pipe will always have fuel in them. Seems to work.

    Steve