Best AT for Big and Tall Rider

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by tallmike, Apr 16, 2013.

  1. Tall Man

    Tall Man Freelancer

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    On general terms, your willingness to invest in a custom tall saddle, lower pegs and bar risers will serve to increase, however modestly, the number of motorcycles that can be made to fit you.

    The Triumph Tiger 800 and the Ducati Multistrada are deceiving. They only look tall and roomy. I found the ergos of both to be rather cramped, esp. in consideration of the bikes' intended missions. And I'm a bit less tall and certainly not as well fed as you are. :D The ergos of the Yamaha Tenere are mildly better in comparison, but on net they really weren't that impressive to me, either. We all have different fit requirements.

    I was reasonably comfortable on the GSA and KTM's big ADV. Unfortunately for me, these two choices are real budget busters.
    #21
  2. TeepS

    TeepS Full Circle Rider

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    I suggest you ride a Buell Ulysses, preferably one with the tall seat ('06 model.)
    #22
  3. quint7

    quint7 "I drove a boat thru the desert"

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    Thanks for a great thread. I'm 'only' 6'3" but had 2 knee surgeries and a hip surgery all on the same side in the last 1 1/2 years due to work (I was a fireman). I have a beater KLR (was only $1000) and 93 Zephyr 1100 (modded with ZRX running gear for fun roads) and sold my Victory Kingpin I used to use for touring and bought a 2012 Cross Roads last summer. That was before the hip operation. Unfortunately the position my hip is in on the Victory is way too tight and painful so I've been thinking about what to trade it in on. Beemers, Triumphs and the Tenere all are on the list for a 'one bike solution'. I used to be a tried and true Yamaha guy so I'll look into the Tenere. Dealers around here suck as far as test rides but I've read a lot of good things about the Yamaha.
    Thanks again for starting a thread for us big fellas.
    #23
  4. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    You really need to give those Triumphs a good look.

    They have made those triples so amazingly smooth now and get good power from them.

    For those who never liked the Super Tenere, I can understand why you found a new 2012 for 11,500 or less. :eek1
    #24
  5. tallmike

    tallmike n00b

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    Well, I went out and test rode a 2013 BMW F800GS and a 2011 BMW R1200GS. My thoughts are as follows:

    F800GS - I like how nimble it is, found it very easy to maneuver despite it having the 21" front wheel. I didn't care for the seat after 10 mins, and the buffeting against my chest was INSANE. I'd need a 3 foot tall windscreen to decrease all that buffeting. Returned to the dealer and said no thanks.

    R1200GS - Wow, what an engine, that thing MOVES. It's also odd feeling the piston stroke left and right and how you can feel it somewhat shift the bike. It was a comfortable ride, except for the wind being blown into my helmet. Would need a new screen on this one for sure.

    I've decided to pass on the ST, I just can't get over how (IMO) ugly it is. I don't like it, and really want something better than a Yamaha.

    I'm going to test ride a Multistrada 1200 S as well and see how I like it. Will keep you updated on my search!
    #25
  6. bmac

    bmac Been here awhile

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    No problem passing on the ST because you don't like the looks but if you are looking for something better than the Yamaha you will be looking for a long time.

    Yamaha quality and reliability is second to none.
    #26
  7. JustKip

    JustKip Long timer

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    There are no truly bad bikes on the market any more (Ural notwithstanding), but if your idea of "quality" includes fit and finish, Yamaha is middle of the pack.
    #27
  8. bmac

    bmac Been here awhile

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    A squadron of BMW owners (and former owners) might disagree with you.
    #28
  9. JustKip

    JustKip Long timer

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    Does "squadron" mean less than 1% ?

    I haven't had any problems with mine in 6 years, but I went and rode one of them fancy Multistradas and now the big GS just don't seem as much fun.

    Rode an S-Ten too...like an ugly GS, assembled in Thailand.
    #29
  10. Pacific

    Pacific Left Coast Adventurer

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    I'm 6'5", 285, and I had an 800XC. Brilliant bike. I put 2" Rox Risers on, and that was about it for ergo mods. We toured on it, 6k miles with the bike loaded for bear, and had no troubles at all. Sold it for a Tiger Explorer, only because I wanted more power for long 2up trips.

    I had one serious complaint about the 800XC -- the seat. This would apply equally to the 800GS, I believe. After a while, the foam will break down and the pressure of your weight will ALL settle on your tail bone. Put aside $500 to upgrade the seat, if you'll be spending any long days in the saddle.
    #30
  11. pluric

    pluric Gimpy Adventurer

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    There's the key word. They make it to the finish.:D
    #31
  12. WARRIORPRINCEJJ

    WARRIORPRINCEJJ Not in the clique...

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    Same for me: I've been lurking in those threads, too.

    The funny thing is, I can't even begin to think why I would be doing such a thing. When I had an LC-8, not a day went by when I didn't think about settin' the damn thing on fire: Not for insurance, just for the pleasure of seeing the fXXker burn.

    And, right now, if I was able to test ride the 1190, I'm sure I'd love it. But, unfortunately, a test ride cannot begin to reflect the whole ownership "experience".




    When I went looking for a large adventure bike, I wanted a gas-it-&-go option: ready to go anywhere, anytime. And, for me, the Super Tenere was that bike.

    When I had the LC-8, I couldn't walk into the garage without finding something wrong, and having to break-out the wrenches. Now that I own the ST, I can't even seem to remember to check the tire pressure. The only time I've been near that thing, with a wrench, was when I installed the RUMBUX kit. Other than that, I thinked I've peeked at the oil level window, a coupla' times, in the last year (nothing to report).

    Because of that, I have to echo these two opinions...


    #32
  13. BryanCO

    BryanCO CO Rider

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    Why is it that people feel the need to defend their bike/purchase? I like the ST but that statement is just stupid.
    #33
  14. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    Telling us how utterly reliable your ST is compared to that KTM isn't saying a whole lot, actually.


    Someone once said, "If you want to celebrate your victory, I ask you one question: Who came in second?"
    #34
  15. WARRIORPRINCEJJ

    WARRIORPRINCEJJ Not in the clique...

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    I wasn't comparing them. I was making a point about questioning why I would even ever lurk in a KTM thread.

    My Yamaha has been very reliable. The KTM I owned wasn't. It's not a comparison; It just is what it is.


    .
    #35
  16. bmac

    bmac Been here awhile

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    With all the information available today the only reason to remain ignorant is if one chooses to do so.

    Take a gander at all the threads posted here and on other forums and come to your own objective opinion on which brand produces the most reliable bikes.
    #36
  17. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    Yeah, and it's a comparison.

    My point was tongue in cheek to a point: Anyone owning that KTM would think a 1968 BSA Bantam was reliable.

    mix one part attempted humour and one part serious KTM is a maintenance whore. :rofl
    #37
  18. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    You sir, without intending it, gave me a great smile this morning.

    I know where you were headed with this, though. The fact of the matter is for most of us a motorcycle is more than a tool (although it may be that, too) and more than a simple purchase. It's a seriously emotional and psychological item-- or else we wouldn't be on advrider immersing ourselves in motorbikes and adventure.

    And that psychic (psychic like Plato, not Tarot) response clouds our judgement from time to time-- or all of the time in extreme cases), causing people to fall on their swords in the face of any criticism of their brand.

    But what you were asking is seminal to any rational person: Take in all the information you find relevant and match that up with lived experience. See if the two jive. Discard those bits of 'fact' that don't match up with what you know (as much as we can know) to be true.
    #38
  19. bmac

    bmac Been here awhile

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    This is absolutely true.

    When one is considering buying a motorcycle many factors come into play. Reliability is one consideration that some put on top of their list and others don't even pay it a thought. There are many folks that are brand loyal and once they choose a make they don't deviate. I say, choose whatever motorcycle makes you happy.

    I have owned numerous brands and am open to most but I tend to rank reliability very high and that strongly influences my buying decision. All the data I have seen still ranks the Japanese brands the highest. Some folks may not be happy with that but that does not change the numbers.
    #39