Best one man adventure tent and sleeping bag?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Castleman, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. larryi52

    larryi52 Adventurer

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    I really like the MSR Hubba Hubba tent. It is the one most recommended by Touratech-USA and they are dead on. It is a two man tent that packs down very small for fitting into panniers. Also, a simple silk sleeping bag should handle warmer weather camping. If it gets too cold in the dessert at night then go for a rectangular 40 degree bag for around $60 at most sporting good stores.
    #21
  2. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=862488
    If I did not already own a Lost Ranger and several other bags,I'd be all over this!

    For tent,look at the Big Agnes Copper Spur series,the one person is one of the roomiest and lightest self supporting true one man tents.
    I like it for the side entry and the solid lower sidewalls means less chance of rain,sand,etc blowing into your tent,but still ventilates very well.(Yes folks,I'm aware of Tarptent and all the other UL shelters out there)

    JR356
    #22
  3. mookybird

    mookybird Gramps

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    If your over six foot tall be sure to read reviews from tall users as this can be a real issue with many designs.

    Like everything else tent designs have really improved in recent years, on a big heavy bike I'll often carry a 2 man tent "why not" on an enduro bike where water, fuel and space get more important I go for the minimum.

    It isn't the minimum but a tarptent moment is a pretty spacious tent that ventilates very well, is affordable and light. It also sets up very easily with two stakes and one pole.

    I don't like bugs and use a mountain laurel designs patrol shelter along with a serenity bug bivy often for dry desert rides, the tarp covers freak storms and the whole deal will fit in a large pocket, depending on your mattress make sure whatever shelter you choose is compatible width wise.

    Sparrowhawk mentioned the ID unishelter, expensive maybe overkill and not very roomy but it is also my go to choice for many trips when high winds and things really going totally to hell are a probability.

    I like western mountaineering bags, again expensive but a down bag if taken reasonable care of is a 20 year plus investment.
    #23
  4. AlanCT

    AlanCT The Byronic Man

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    This.:deal

    Since I started using a Hennessy Hammock, I have only resorted to my tent when there was no choice. Not only is it supremely comfortable to sleep in with no soreness or stiffness in the morning, it also packs to the size of a football and you could pitch it on the ground like a little tent if you had to.

    My tent, btw, is a Kelty Gunnison 2. It's a good tent at a reasonable price, with two doors and two vestibules, but I always miss my hammock when I use it.
    #24
  5. THUMPER0475

    THUMPER0475 Adventurer

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    I typically buy quality brand name items. I was in a pinch just before a big ride and had my daughter head for REI and Walmart to compare. She bought the walmart tent. I wasn't happy at the time but she did save me $150. hard to complain to much. Frankly, the tent works fine. My thought was if it broke or leaked i'd just chuck it. I've had it for 3 years with no problems yet. Does it work better than I thought? Absolutely. Perfect for summer rides. Just my 2 cents.
    #25
  6. wee-twin

    wee-twin Been here awhile

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    MSR hubba hubba gets my vote also. Perfect for one and gear. They also make a one and three or for person version. Poles are short which helps with packing, great ventilation and quick setup. A few years ago backpacker magazine recomended it in their gear evaluation. You can see it reviewed on youtube.
    #26
  7. Jud

    Jud Long timer

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    If you are bike camping, weight isn't really a huge factor. Try using a super lightweight tent built for hiking and you usually have to spend alot of money. That big money tent sucks when you pack it away on the bike, ride hard on rough trails and open it to find it's had a hole rubbed in it from bouncing around with other junk or rubbing against whatever you strapped it to.

    I have a good tent for hiking because weight does matter. For bike camping, I learned that a cheap ass Wallmart tent does just as well at keeping the bugs out and if you throw away that little rain fly it comes with and use a good large sil-nylon tarp, it's just as waterproof and you get a nice "porch" outta the deal and you still have less in the whole deally. If a hole does get rubbed in it or you rash it while wrecking so what, a whole 50$ or less {the smaller 2man is really a 1 man with some room for gear and cost like 20-25$} wasted. Just carry a repair kit for small tears and or broken poles and you have it made. I don't even use a ground cloth on the cheapy tents.

    Now, if I'm packin it in on my back,,,,, yea, spend the money for "light".

    Sleeping bag???? If you have room, Walmart has a synthetic bag rated at 10-30 degrees that packs fairly small, Coleman Max I think. Have a bit more room? They have a 0-20 degree bag made by Coleman also and it's called the Traverse I think. Either bag is around 60$ and I sorta suspect those temp ratings so a 20 degree Max might actually be a 30-35 degree bag and the the Traverse might well be a 20-30 degree bag. Good thing is that it's sold by Walmart,,, if it doesn't live up to your expectations,,, take the sucker back.

    If you are really wanting small packed size and a bit of warmth though, no choice but to spend a bit more. I like down and I have a 40 degree 750 fill bag that packs down to nerf foot ball size. Also have a 10 degree bag that packs down to foot ball size. But if you are amping in Washington state,,,, you will need to either spend real big money on the new hydrophobic down bags with a water resistant shell or go with the synthetics like the Walmart.

    What ever bag you choose you will need a good pad and if it's cold {less than 40 degrees}, you better get a decent insulated one. I hate big, bulky foam pads so I have a Exped and a BA insulated versions. They are fairly light and warm. For summer use, a cheap {like under 20$}, inflatable Walmart matress works great, is perfectly reliable {I have one that's well over 5 years old and has been used repeatedly} if a bit bulky and heavy.
    #27
  8. RememberTheFallen

    RememberTheFallen Been here awhile

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    Great info gentlemen. To everyone still offering recommendations; you do you realize this was a 3 year old post that was bumped to the top, right? I sure hope he has made up his mind by now. It is good that people search older posts for ideas and maybe re-open them to ask similar questions but if you search for a thread and are giving advice make sure it is a recent topic.
    #28
  9. DockingPilot

    DockingPilot Hooked Up and Hard Over

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    I have the Bibler Ahwanee II, Great venting when you want it. And bomb proof when you need it to be.

    The only thing I hate about it, is the setup. Trying to put those poles inside without poking a hole through the bottom is a real pain in the ass. If the only just put hangers on the outside shell of that tent, like Hilleberg, it would be the cats ass in tents.
    In my opinion anyway.
    #29
  10. Jud

    Jud Long timer

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    Yep, didn't pay it a bit of notice. :D


    But no biggie, maybe someone else can use the advise.
    #30
  11. Beemermcr

    Beemermcr Big, Dumb, Happy!

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    Thread is old, but the information is still very useful!

    Paul
    #31
  12. RememberTheFallen

    RememberTheFallen Been here awhile

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    No doubt! I enjoyed reading it. Just wanted to point out that the op had been gone for a while.

    And just so I don't seem like a douche my current set up is a Big Agnes Lost Ranger and Marmot Limelight 2P. Plenty of room in the tent but kinda heavy. I have a Hennessy Asym ultralight but it just is not comfortable enough for me at 6'6" so I am looking at the new hammock from warbonnets. The name slips me but it has spreader poles and lays very flat. I also have several yards of silnylon and noseeum netting lying around from a failed ultralight backpacking shelter project. I am thinking about making a tarp tent type shelter that would anchor one end to the ground and the other to the handlebars. Have seen a few designers like that and they seem super easy and simple. No poles, no need for trees.
    #32
  13. Beemermcr

    Beemermcr Big, Dumb, Happy!

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    Love to see what you develop! Am 6'4" 300!bs and love my big Hennessy, but not enough reliable tree camps around Utah so just carry a tent instead; thought about using the bike but never found a good way that didn't approach setting up a tent in time/complexity!

    Paul
    #33