Best Shop Tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by lightsorce, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. scottrnelson

    scottrnelson Team Orange

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    Yeah, but if you use one of those it isn't a shop trick, and doesn't belong in this thread. :evil
  2. barko1

    barko1 barko1

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    May not pertain to motorcycle wrenching but putting a hole in the filter, with a screwdriver of other pointy tool, to drain it before removal, works well on my big ass Ford 7.3. Forgot to do so last change and of course I dropped the filter and dumped a quart on the ground.
  3. gn77b

    gn77b Been here awhile

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    yes, I know.
  4. wvboy

    wvboy Been here awhile

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    A small piece of sandpaper between the filter wrench and filter with the rough side toward the filter works good also.
  5. Shepfly

    Shepfly Adventurer

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    Useing 1 gallon empty metal rectangular (like lacquer thinner) containers, carefully cut out one of the large sides,leaving enough material to fold over the cut edges so all sharp finger sliceing materal is not exposed. You now have a parts bin with a handel on one end. I made a wooden shelf setup for 5 bins in a row and 5 shelves high. Just have to scrouge up the containers, Dave
  6. EddMc

    EddMc are we there yet

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    Or you can use old antifreeze bottles with out the worry of sharp edges.
  7. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    Next time you have to thread a wire from the front of your bike back to the battery compartment, take a trick from sailors and electricians. Tie a "pennant" to the wire so that the next time, you can use it to pull through the next accessory - and another pennant.
    [​IMG]
  8. nmarkato

    nmarkato Making it work

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    I sometimes come across a screw that I'm having a hard time turning out and is in an area where using a torch to apply heat might damage something. (near plastic components, wires or painted surfaces) In this situation I have had good results with placing the tip of a soldering gun against the top of the fastener and letting it cook for a while.
  9. Barnun

    Barnun n00b

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    Not sure if anyone has tried this. I bought a bike that had been sitting and it ran poorly (got a good price because of that). it would only run with the choke half on. with 4 carbs on the bike, I thought i'd take a chance and try to cheat. nothing to lose on this really. I pulled the fuel line off. I used seafoam in the spray can with the little straw. I started the bike and let it begin to use the fuel in the carbs and incoming fuel line. I kept re filling the fuel line with seafoam (not carb cleaner) once the carbs were full of seafoam the bike died. I let it sit that way overnight. the next day I reconnected the fuel line allowing fresh gas to the carbs. the bike rolled over a couple times and fired up. It ran pretty darn good. I spiked the gas tank with seafoam and rode the bike. It worked like a champ. this same theory might work well on the kids mini bikes and 4 wheelers when spring comes around and you realize you didnt prep the gas for winter. Ethanol is a bad bad thing. The good thing about ethanol is how much energy it saves our country. it only takes 1.2 gallons of gasoline energy to make 1 gallon of ehtanol. I wish I could own a business and have the government pay me to lose money and force people to buy my product .....
  10. mfp4073

    mfp4073 Long timer

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    I like that, will file it away for future use.
  11. AK Oldman

    AK Oldman WANDRN

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    Seafoam has long been used as a fuel system cleaner. Pour some in the gas tank and it works great cleaning carbs and fuel injectors while you ride/drive.
  12. groundrules

    groundrules Long timer

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    When splitting cases or pulling covers, I make a simple template by tracing that allows me to both keep track of the screws and remember what lengths go in which holes. Often there's along time span between disassembly and reconstruction, so this is works out nice, and I can just hang it on a wall hook. It also reminds me if any are missing or beat up, requiring replacement.

    [​IMG]
  13. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    That is a really great trick and one that I have seen done when I worked in shops. It is most useful when one has different length bolts. If they are all the same it is of less value.
  14. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    My mentor always would take the new gasket and trace it onto the cardboard backer it was packaged against.

    Instant template for the same game.
  15. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    I don't think this one has been mentioned before; please forgive if I missed it.

    On bikes that have endless (no discernable master link) chains from the factory, I usually clean the side plate of one link with parts cleaner, and then put a nice big dab of a bright color (yellow, red) automotive paint from a paint pen or the like in the middle of the side plate.

    This helps me to find a starting/ending point for chain maintenance items like cleaning and relubing. Counting links gets pretty old, pretty fast.
  16. AK Oldman

    AK Oldman WANDRN

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    I prefer putting things like head bolts, manifold bolts, rod and main bearing bolts etc, back in the same holes they came out of. So even though they are all the same length, a bolt template like this comes in very handy, been using them for over 45 years now.
  17. scottrnelson

    scottrnelson Team Orange

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    I've gotten in the habit of putting the bolts back in the actual holes that they came out of when I can. I'm even less likely to lose them or get them mixed up that way.
  18. Spud99

    Spud99 Been here awhile

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    I get old nail polishes in different colours to use to mark bolt heads that have been torqued on reassembly. With different colours I know if it is newly retorqued by looking. I never forget to tighten important stuff like brake parts etc.
  19. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    You can get torque paint from an aircraft supply. It's a thick yellow lacquer that's painted on fasteners when they're torqued, and it will crack if the fastener is moved or loosens from vibration.
  20. gn77b

    gn77b Been here awhile

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    exactly, I can't imagine myself shopping for nail polish.