Best Shop Tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by lightsorce, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    It's called "witness paint" and the most common brand is "Torque Seal". If you can't find it locally, its readily available cheap on Ebay.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-2oz-Tube-...160?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35be8892a0

    - Mark
  2. Stumpalump

    Stumpalump Been here awhile

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    I rarely wash my bikes with water to keep corrosion down and to stop dirt, dust and the mud it creates from getting into moving parts. I do use break cleaner on anything I take apart instead to keep the dirt out of the parts I'm working on.

    Throw away chain lube and use Tri-Flow instead. Chain lube is the cheapest oil they can throw in a can but Tri-Flow is a real high performance lubricant. Grainger sells 16oz spray cans. I use it on everything else that needs lube as well. It won't gunk.

    If you don't want to risk dropping tiny washers and nuts then put a tiny Allen wrench over the studs and let the loose nuts and washers slide safely onto the Allen wrench as they come off. It works as well when installing them if you use the largest size that fits.

    In the garage the moths are no match for a shop vac. Those bastards can fly into your ear and attempt to gnaw their way thru your ear drum. To get them out you sit still while shining a light in your ear. They see the light and crawl out. If you kill them with the break cleaner then plan a trip to the ER to have it dug out.
  3. mfp4073

    mfp4073 Long timer

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    :huh
  4. KyoXR

    KyoXR Clouds, Snow, Rain

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    that's a better idea, I usually just keep one plate shiny clean,


    Double :huh:huh...
  5. cyclejohn

    cyclejohn Been here awhile

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    I have not read through the entire 50 pages, sorry if this is a repeat.
    To remove a centerstand from a bike, you will need to take off the centerstand spring. They are strong springs, and difficult to pull off. To easily remove, set the bike on the centerstand. The spring will be streched. Reach under the bike and insert 5 or 6 coins (nickels quarters , etc) in spaces where the spring has been streched. Then when you push the bike off the centerstand the spring will still be stretched, and should easily unhook from centerstand and frame.
  6. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    I've heard of this one, but I've tried it on a couple bikes and it never worked for me.

    - Mark
  7. warewolf

    warewolf Tyre critic

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    I've done the opposite: fit the spring by inserting coins one by one into each coil to stretch it. It was a near thing, the coins kept wanting to fly out, but it did get the job done.
  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Use large flat washers and stick a rod/wire through it to keep them in place.

    Jim :brow
  9. Contevita

    Contevita Cigar Adventurer

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    Brilliant!
  10. warewolf

    warewolf Tyre critic

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    Awesome!
  11. Unstable Rider

    Unstable Rider Moto Fotografist

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    Damn.. that is a cool idea....

    Thus far, I made a puller out of a coathanger and a block of wood for a handle.

    Worked, but not as McGiver tech as the washer trick. :evil
  12. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

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  13. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    Using vice grips directly on the spring loop will kill the spring in the near future, it creates a 'stress riser' and the loop will break off. Something I learned snowmobiling, lots of springs on the exhaust system.
  14. Fixnfly

    Fixnfly Been here awhile

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    A paintbrush along with a garden hose does an excellent job of cleaning mud/dirt from hard to reach places on a bike or quad. I can make my muddy four wheeler look almost new in about an hour:freaky
  15. Bogfarth

    Bogfarth Fridge Magnet Safety Tester

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    Or you can get a length of cord (shoe lace, waxed string) and simply make a two loops out of it in a figure-8. Slip one loop between the last few coils of the spring, and then wrap it around the coils twice for security. Now run the other end through the loop at the coils to make a handle, and haul on it. A few weeks ago I had pulled the duplex spring off of my V-Star 650's kick stand and couldn't get the *^&$ back on. This did the trick. With thinner cordage, make more loops to spread the stress and lower the risk of punchin' yaself in da mug. :evil

    Got a screw or bolt that will turn a little, but sticks and won't come out? Squirt some Liquid Wrench on the offender, slap your wrench or screw driver on the head, and turn it loose-tight-loose. You'll be able to use this "rocking" movement to pop the screw or bolt out without boogering the head all to hell and gone. I did this a little bit ago to pop a made-from-cheese screw holding a heat shield in place. It likely would have snapped in half if I'd bullied it. Remember that patience is key, young Grass-Smoker. :deal

    Learned this one here on ADV the other day. Tired of forking over $5+ per O-ring at the dealer? McMaster-Carr has a ton of 'em, including solvent(gas)-proof ones, on their web site ( McMaster-Carr ). All that's needed is the measurements of your dud. Or you can check a local bearing supply shop; odds are they might have the very part you need on the cheap.
  16. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    This trick works, but my experience is that you have to have very stout bootlaces - I've shredded shoe laces on several attempts. A variation is to not pull directly on the spring, but loop it over some part on the back of the bike and then pull forward - this doubles the mechanical advantage. But be darn sure the bike is well-secured - this is an easy way to have a bike come tumbling down on top of you.

    - Mark
  17. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    Silly stand springs.:wink: I use my brake pliers, the ones designed to remove/install brake springs in automotive brake drums. Work well in most cases. :D
  18. FMFDOC

    FMFDOC Long timer

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    This thread is so awesome!!! :clap
  19. Stumpalump

    Stumpalump Been here awhile

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    Need a magnifying glass or mirror to see where your head won't fit? Your hand with a smart phone will fit into a tight spot and you can take a picture. Same thing with reading fine print on circuit boards. Take picture then zoom it up to a size you can see.
  20. Stumpalump

    Stumpalump Been here awhile

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    Super glue will work as lock tight in a pinch and assembly lube will work as an anti seize. Neither are as good as the proper stuff but how often are you proper?