Best Shop Tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by lightsorce, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. AK Oldman

    AK Oldman WANDRN

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    249
    Location:
    Back home in Alaska!
    My hands get extremely dry, particularly in low humidity climates, and the ends of my fingers and thumbs split open on me. I use super glue to hold the split closed. It works very well on minor cuts as well.
  2. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

    Joined:
    May 13, 2009
    Oddometer:
    6,200
    Location:
    Dearborn, MI
    Eastman Chemical originally developed cyanoacrylate adhesive (super glue) as a surgical adhesive. I remember my dad bringing home a bottle with Eastman 910 on the label.
  3. ManiZ

    ManiZ Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    109
    Location:
    Colorado; 6,400ft.
    To maximize space utilization while minimizing damage to car doors, garage walls, floor-standing cabinets etc. buy some cheap swimming pool noodles, slice them lengthwise with carving knife or sharp blade and stick them to the surface to be protected or to the one to protect from using double-sided tape. Cheap and effective.
  4. mfp4073

    mfp4073 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,573
    Location:
    Central Florida
    [​IMG]


    I keep one of those "medicated acne pad" containers next to my bathroom sink. You know, the kind that are marketed to teens with pimples. You know how you always get cleaned up, showered and then look in the mirror or at the back of your arm and find still another smudge of grease or dirt you missed. This stuff will clean you down to the skin and are just the right size for spot cleanup.
  5. FixerDave

    FixerDave KLR650 - XR200R

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    409
    Location:
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    New Skin, available in the first-aid isle next to the tape in my local drugstore, works basically the same way without being dangerously nasty-sticky. Paint it on, and it fills in the cracks and does a not too bad a job at covering things up. It wears off by the end of the day. If you want to remove it, just paint more on (it's its own solvent) and wipe off. I pretty much use it every day. A while back, I nicked a finger in the shop... stupid wipe against a cotter pin that was way too sharp. It tore up the skin pretty good. I slapped some New Skin on (stung like hell), wrapped it in a bandage, and forgot about it. A few days later, when the bandage fell off, there was a lump of living skin sticking up... you know, a bit of that torn stuff that usually dies and falls off. Damn New Skin worked too well, kept that alive. It took a few days of trimming to nibble it back town to flush. The little 30mil bottle I picked up has lasted months. I'm sold on it.

    In the shop, I've taken to taping my fingers up with cloth tape, again, from the first-aid isle. I run a strip of it out, hanging from above, and snip off a little section to cover the tip of a finger, then a longer section to wrap around it. I usually do 2 fingers and a thumb on each hand... the ones prone to cracking. I do this before they crack, pretty much every time I'm in the shop now. It only takes a minute to put on, and take off, and it works. Not particularly expensive either. Peeling the tape off at the end of shop-day leaves my fingertips the cleanest part of my hands... a little weird but after the hand cleaner, I don't have the under-nail, impossible to clean stains I used to get. The only problem is if you get into a lot of oils or solvents as it can turn the adhesive into goop. Hand cleaner deals with it, regular soap... not so good.

    David...
  6. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
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    4,748
    Location:
    Hiding off Hwy 6, B.C.
  7. AK Oldman

    AK Oldman WANDRN

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    249
    Location:
    Back home in Alaska!
    I have been using New Skin foro minor stuff for years. As bad as my fingers crack New Skin just isn't strong enough.
  8. scooteraug02

    scooteraug02 Dog Rancher

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,555
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    When you are done in the shop and have to do some moving in the house.

    [​IMG]

    They work great and save your back and carpet.


    To clean your camelback water carrier use denture cleaner. Google it!
  9. EvoLife

    EvoLife Evolving.....Slowly

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Oddometer:
    988
    Location:
    The Great North Wood (of Jersey)
    For picking up steel shavings and chips with a magnet without having to clean them all off the magnet afterward.

    LINK


    Ignore the thunder.
  10. thisflatearth

    thisflatearth 2 wheel has been

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    938
    Location:
    Wayne, NJ
    I almost turned around with the camera when the thunder cracked. The spring breaking off the garage door was even scarier, glad we were outside the door when it happened.

    Take Evolifes advise with a grain of salt as he is the harbinger of death :lol3
  11. EvoLife

    EvoLife Evolving.....Slowly

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Oddometer:
    988
    Location:
    The Great North Wood (of Jersey)
    I haven't seen that look on your face, or laughed that hard in a long time.

    His garage door didn't want to stay up by it's self, so while I was there I suggested we take some slack out of the spring cables. While doing it he even commented how he should add safety cables to the springs in case they break.

    As we are leaving he closes the garage door and a few seconds later we hear the spring snap and slam into the other side of the door right where he's standing. It is just like anything else we do. What can go wrong will.
  12. STUFF2C

    STUFF2C We Ain't Left Yet!!

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,078
    Location:
    O-lando
    Utter Butter- the real thing for dairy cows. Not the stuff for woman. this stuff works great for dry skin. My vet turned a friends wife on to it for her dry heals and it cured them.
  13. Kinsman

    Kinsman Ribs....for her pleasure

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,293
    Location:
    Bitterroot Valley, Western Montana
    Yep, Bag balm too. And you can get pure lanolin too; smells like a barn plus it works great.
  14. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Anatomically Correct

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    15,239
    Location:
    Chicago-ish
    Also HoofMakers (silly name) . . . .works great!
  15. hillbillypolack

    hillbillypolack Grumpy Old Goat

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,466
    Location:
    Lidsville
    Relocating an old home stereo has already been suggested, but I'd also add a set of moisture proof speakers to keep humidity affecting them.

    I've had a gas heater and dehumidifier in the garage for years-mostly because I dislike having the floor sweating and rusting tools, bikes and parts in the garage. Works like a charm even if I have to manually empty it.

    Old toothbrushes work like a charm for cleaning parts and chains.

    Garage sale pie tins, muffin pans and cookie sheets with tall edges work fantastic for parts cleaning 'bins', and even as shallow organizers in tool chests. I have a few cookie sheets with Oetiker clamps so I can paw through them yet they are still 'organized' in my fastener drawer.

    Have a container of Q-tips handy for small cleaning duty. A roll of paper towels and garage rags as well.

    When tuning a bike, have a shop fan feeding cool air into the front of the bike. If you don't have a table at the bike's height, use your tie-downs to hang it from the ceiling.

    Trawl through craigslist for a cycle lift. Even if it's the hydraulic foot pedal version, it'll save your back several times over.

    Use compressed air in nooks and crannies after washing your bike to prevent rusting from standing water. If you want to get particular, use WD-40 sparingly at pivots etc after drying the areas.
  16. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,610
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    Do not run the bike or car in the garage, even with the door open.
    Carbon monoxide builds up in your body & it stays there. Once you are full, that’s it. I learned the hard way.
    Garage door wide open & car pipes at the door. Didn’t run it for long either.
  17. KeithinSC

    KeithinSC Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,720
    Location:
    Sandhills of SC
    Set your dehumidifier on a bucket, high enough to drain the water far enough, connect a garden hose to the drain and snake it out the door or through a hole in the wall, I haven't emptied mine in years since I did this:clap
  18. KeithinSC

    KeithinSC Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,720
    Location:
    Sandhills of SC
    When you dump out that jar of mixed hardware looking for just the right screw, dump it into your dustpan. When you finish pawing through the pile, it is easy to tip up and dump back into the jar/coffee can.
  19. mfp4073

    mfp4073 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,573
    Location:
    Central Florida
    I always dump it on a towel, rag, etc of appropriate size. Pick up the corners and funnel it back in.
  20. wos

    wos Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,725
    Location:
    beside the cool pool
    I use an old baking sheet with the corner cut off, dump the junk in, dig out what you need and pour the rest bake in the container.

    One from my dad; to form small bins, cut the end of the big rectangular juice jugs (or the really old toner cans).
    About 1.5 inches back, cut it again on three sides,cut off and discard one of the sides.leave the fourth side attached and with tabs on the side. fold the fourth side up 45 to form the front and use the other two tab sides to secure it in place with whatever you have, wire, rivets, string, hotglue.

    make them in multiples and you can tape them all together, stuff small things in there and they stay organized on a shelf.

    He also used a lot of jars, nail the lid to the bottom of a shelf and you can see whats in it, easily unscrew it and it goes back where it came from every time.