Best Shop Tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by lightsorce, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. scooteraug02

    scooteraug02 Dog Rancher

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    When I worked at a gas station the mechanic would take a thermostat housing put some water on the concrete floor, rub the housing back and forth on the floor milling it to a flat clean finish.
  2. GlennR

    GlennR Playin' in the Fire

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    I just discovered this thread. I'm just on pg 7...maybe this has been mentioned already.


    I like to keep large scraps of Blue Board (foam insulating board) and also cardboard handy. I use them to sit, kneel, or lay on while working on my vehicles & bikes. The blue board is waterproof, cushions, and keeps your butt warm, which is great if your working outside and/or on gravel or damp ground. It's also easy to wipe clean if you get it dirty.
    I use the large cardboard scraps for the same purpose, but it's more disposable.

    I'm also a big fan of rubber bands, large office binder clips, and magnets in the shop.
  3. nuggets

    nuggets Fries with that?

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    I like that one.

    I like to keep a disposable tyvek coverall with my spare tire in the cage. I can throw it in if I need to do a roadside tire change and keep my clothes clean.

    I also reccomend carrying a small square of housewrap in your bike's toolkit. That way you can spread it out and lay your tools and parts on it, instead of losing them in the dirt.
  4. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

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    Housewrap? What the hell is 'housewrap'? :brow :lol3
    I had a small canvas bag of tools in one of my cars. There was also a piece of plastic sheeting, *Visqueen*, about 18’ – 20” square in there. Dump the tools on the on the plastic sheet & roll 'em all back up in the plastic sheet when done. Worked real good.
    Maybe that’s what you’re talkin’ ‘bout. :1drink
  5. groundrules

    groundrules Long timer

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    light weight, tough, flexible, water proof, chemical resistant, easy to come by (especially if you have access to some first class mail envelopes).

    [​IMG]
  6. dwayne

    dwayne Silly Adventurer

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    The best thing I did in my old garage was paint the walls in high gloss pure white exterior paint. Easy to wipe down, and it sure brightens things up.
  7. richarddacat

    richarddacat best jelly roll in town

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    +1 on the house OR roof wrap. Use it for about everything that I use to use cardboard for.

    [​IMG]
  8. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

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    Housewrap
    Well! :thumb I guess I’ll have to look into getting a chunk or two of that stuff. Probably could pick up some scraps being thrown away where there is some house construction going on.
  9. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

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    Good idea.

    I used to work outside; winter was very painful: in the cold, my finger tips would split open, too. It was quite painful to tighten wire nuts.

    The wounds were very wide and glue might not have helped. My trick for such conditions was to tape finger tips with the white medical tape ("waterproof tape"). This would last most of the day, even with a lot of pressure applied to the fingers.
  10. duck

    duck Banned

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    Tyvek also works pretty well as a footprint for your tent.
  11. groundrules

    groundrules Long timer

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    +1
  12. tommu56

    tommu56 Long timer

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    And if you wash it in a washing machine it is more pliable and still waterproof but air dry it no dryer!!!!!!!
  13. mark1150

    mark1150 Been here awhile

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    I work outside and I too suffer(ed) with split finger tips.
    Now as soon as I feel the first onsets I use lip balm during the day, covered with insulation tape.
    The balm works like magic moisturising and keeping the area soft and flexible therefore non dried out and split.
    At night (at home ) a couple of applications of germaline (I don't know if the guys around the rest of the world have this, it smells of root beer) or similar medicated products keeps them nice.
  14. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Get a tube of anhydrous lanolin and try it. It's the active ingredient in a lot of the balms made for cracked fingers and hands. A little goes a long way.
  15. mark1150

    mark1150 Been here awhile

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    Thanks mate,
    I'll give it a go.
  16. richarddacat

    richarddacat best jelly roll in town

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    something else to try for dry hands.
    soak your hands with your favorite lotion, Neutrogena is what I like. Do this before going to bed but wear a pair of gloves like brown jersey gloves.

    I also do this when working on the vehicles but I wear nitrile gloves instead.
  17. FMFDOC

    FMFDOC Long timer

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  18. stevemd

    stevemd Adventurer

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    I learned this working in the Guzzi shop back in the late '70's. After adjusting a valve, leave the feeler gauge in and twirl the pushrod with your fingers. You may find a tight spot where you can only pull the feeler gauge out with difficulty if at all. This is where you re-adjust the valve.

    As an old timer said, a little valve noise is better than no noise.
  19. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    Good one! Thanks.
    Here also some sage advice I learned from another Inmate. To get the feel of the clearance you wish to set during a valve adjustment, set a micrometer at the thickness of the feeler gage you are using. The gage should slide through the valve clearance with the same resistance as the gage through the pre-set mic.

    Oh yeah, when a Guzzi is running well, it makes too much valve noise to hear the valve noise.


    [​IMG]
  20. fbj913

    fbj913 On the Beemer Kool-Aid

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