Best tip I heard lately

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by TUCKERS, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Motomantra

    Motomantra Registered Lurker

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    Strap my helmet on BEFORE I put the gloves on. This still gets me once in a while
  2. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Happened to me today!
  3. pratered

    pratered Jackpiner

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    Wyoming
    Ride the bike you are on!
  4. bobw

    bobw Harden the phuck up

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    I think in 50+ years of riding I have done almost every one of these things at least once and some a few times more just to make sure I stay humble(?). I can always tell I need to "take 5" and am pushing things be it fatigue or any number of distractions (the cleavage of the cashier has my vote!) that cause the gloves on without a key in the ignition or helmet strap secured things up to the very gut wrenching cards and credential "where are they now" scenarios.

    Nice to know many of us have similar stories and each time I "do it", I reinforce my commitment to strict protocols. My best advice from my wife is "don't worry about stuff here, have fun and if you don't want to do laundry you can get new socks at any truck stop or walmart in every town you come to".

    Cheers
  5. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

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    This is significant.

    If, for example, I lean or turn as aggressively on my dual sport as I do on my street bike, I'll likely end up in reduced circumstances. This has been field tested, so to speak. So I have to be careful to remember that the bikes don't always handle cross-pollination very well. Ride the bike you are on.
    Macho Man2 and pratered like this.
  6. Nick NG

    Nick NG n00b

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    When I rode in Vietnam experienced riders said me that I should pretend I don't speak English when the cops stop me, because either way they'd ask for money (it's Vietnam), they'd find whatever and even your international licence doesn't work there, they'd charge you for that and let ride away. This is ridiculous but if you don't speak English or Vietnamese they will be tired of this circus and let you go.
  7. Motor7

    Motor7 Been here awhile

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    East Tennessee
    Rode into to town on two errands....first was drop a package at FedX, second was go to Verizon store and whine about my Motorola "not so smart" phone that consistently refused to notify me of voice mail's. The Droid battery also only lasted about 4 hours each day before going tit's up. Got a call while at FedX, walked out to the bike while yapping, geared up and went over to Verizon. Geared down, went into the store and reached for my phone to show the guy the issue(s). Hmmm, no phone, walked out to bike, went through tank bag, panniers and rear box....nada....."uh oh". Rode back to FedX and there it was laying in the express lane of the 4 lane highway flat as a really thin pancake...more like a asphalt stomped crepe. Somehow I had violated my own rule of never ever set anything down on top of the pannier or top box......EVER.

    I do suspect though that in my Motorola Droid cloud of frothing hate I might just have subconsciously sealed the damn things fate. It all worked out and Verizon actually gave me(FOC) and older smart phone that someone had traded in so my voicemail odyssey had a fairy tail ending.

    Oh, and spare bike key is zip tied up under the fairing....just in case.
  8. AteamNM

    AteamNM Wonna Be ADVrider

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    :baldy:baldy:baldy:baldy:baldy

    Hmmmmm,I have lost 2 front fender packs that hold tubes. Reason I didn't want to drill holes in my fenders to use zip ties. Stuffed a Molle hat into my jacket getting gas, ultimately the hat I really liked fell to the ground while pumping gas. Realized it was gone less than a mile into the ride, went back and it was gone, store employees knew nothing. Lost a lid on a Tusk pannier box in Colorado, went back and found some stuff on the road that flew out of the box, never found the lid. I added cables inside the lid so they can never come off. Recent trip my buddy forgot to zip up his Wolfman tank bag, lost a GoPro and tire gauge. In Baja buddy lost a rear fender mounted tool bag, we didn't even go back to look for it leaving Mike's Sky Ranch. This list goes on and on.

    I have a spare key on my bike hidden and I use a lanyard with my key that I hang around my neck when off the bike. The longer your on the road, the better developed your routine becomes, habits on wallet - check, glasses - check, scarf - check, cell phone - check check. Taking photos of your credit cards, drivers license and other important documents will serve you well if you loose your wallet.

    [​IMG]
    Unstable Rider and Macho Man2 like this.
  9. PNWRR

    PNWRR not fragile

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    I wear an old worn out First Gear jacket for off road riding and keep a very loud whistle in the top pocket. Saves me from yelling if I ever go off that ledge. :arg
  10. True North

    True North Adventurer

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    Park Rapids,mn
    I've done that! Now I have a pocket protector type holder zip tied to the handle bars. Anytime I take off the glasses I slip them in the case. Once the helmet is on I put the glasses back on, but if I forget their still there.
    pratered likes this.
  11. Strngwlkr

    Strngwlkr Most of the important stuff works- sorta

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    I keep a small flash drive, like a pendant, on a my neck chain. On it is pertenent medical records, allergies, mess, emergency contact info etc. the outside of the drive is marked ICE and the other side is a Red Cross. As it never leaves my neck- little chance of anyone getting the information easily, although I still don't put my SS# on it
    Unstable Rider likes this.
  12. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    Don't know if true or not, but have heard EMTs are NOT allowed to use them for fear of getting a virus on their computers.
    Any EMTs or others know if that's correct?
  13. Strngwlkr

    Strngwlkr Most of the important stuff works- sorta

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    You are correct! As a former NREMT-p I can atest to that. HOWEVER, that's NOT the EMTs job. Their "Job" is to keep you alive until they get you to a hospital. There a drive can be opened - pretty safely- and the information down loaded.
    Else wise---I don't see a whole lotta people loading up a drive, putting it around their neck and then having a serious accident just to infect a hospital- I am NOT putting that out of the realm of some idiots out there---just minimal--YMMV
    Chad and scootac like this.
  14. Unstable Rider

    Unstable Rider Farto Motografist

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    Sometimes I get side tracked locking up the panniers, the tailbox and my helmet,
    and then figure out later I left the single- ignition key in THE IGNITION... :(
  15. Jolly Roger

    Jolly Roger Been here awhile

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    Always keep your keyless ride fob safe . . . preferably tethered to you.

    I recently rode to Tulum (about 45 minutes away) from where I was staying in Playa del Carmen. I had a great ride there . . . enjoyed a nice beer and pizza and then decided to scoot down the coast road to see the beach . . . albeit in the dark. I arrived at the beach just as thunder started booming and lightning began to light up the sky. I thought "oh shit" better head home so turned the bike around and no sooner had I done that than the heaven's opened up in one of the most violent tropical thunderstorms I've ever been in. I pulled over to the side of the road to get my goretex liner out of my luggage, put it on (by which time I was already soaked), jumped on the bike and headed off again.

    The rain was beating down so hard I couldn't see a thing so had to drive about 3 miles an hour following the brake lights of vehicle in front of me. I got about 4 miles down the road and realized that not being able to see anything I'd missed my turn off and was now heading in the wrong direction. I pulled over on the road in the pitch black and rain, only to see a warning light illuminating my dash. "oh shit" I thought . . I really don't need a mechanical problem right now. In the dark and rain I couldn't really see what the warning light was so I just turned the bike around and headed back in the direction of Tulum. I arrived at gas station, had a closer look at the light and realized with a sinking feeling in my stomach that it was indicating there was no key. Yep, when I stopped to get my liner out I put the key/fob on the seat and drove off with it there . . . so it had fallen off in the rain and the dark somewhere in the last 4 miles.

    Sooooo . . off I go, riding back in the dark and the pouring rain to where I stopped to put on my liner. I arrived there and spent 10 minutes walking around in the pouring rain trying to find my keys. No luck. So, I set off at a snails pace, standing up the pegs, going as slow as I could down the road trying to find the keys. It was hard to see much of anything in the dark and the rain but after about 2 miles my headlight caught a little glint of light in the road and sure enough it was my key fob. Luckily it was right in the middle of the road so nobody had driven offer it and crushed it. These things are about $300 so needless to say I was pretty happy to see it. Also, if I had switched off the bike without the fob I couldn’t have go it started again and would have been stranded. So, with key firmly in hand I rode home 45 minutes in the pouring rain. But you know . . . despite getting soaked, losing my keys and arriving home looking like a drowned rat. . . its was great to be out on the bike and at the end of it all I had a big smile on my face.

    Since then, the fob is secured to my belt with a lanyard so it never leaves me . . . even when locking / unlocking the panniers.
    ACR, Bugzy, Jeff Sichoe and 3 others like this.
  16. AustinRT

    AustinRT Been here awhile

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    You are one very lucky fella. Concern for loosing or breaking the fob I decided to get duplicate key for boxes. I had forgotten the fob actually has a key. Fob only goes in my front right pocket next to the wallet. Duplicate key goes in same location but its purpose is only to access the boxes, remove seat or remove GPS. Dup key was only $20. Now I have left that key in one of the boxes and rendered security null. Also might loose it but $20 is better than losing $300 fob.
  17. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Great and sensible, useful tips. Keep 'em coming. The shared personal experiences are the best teaching aid. I've got at least a half dozen I'm taking from this so far.
    I'm already reaping benefits, not misplacing my credit card, wallet, key, glasses! I've put a whistle on my jacket zipper.
  18. fozrunner

    fozrunner Been here awhile

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    Lethbridge, Alberta
    Test your rain gear on a wet day close to home before a big trip. I tried this last week in a huge downpour. Unfortunately I got boxed in by traffic and two cattle liners came up in the right lane, I couldn't get in a position to avoid them. As they passed the rain and road spray turned brown as the cattle liners were washed out and on to me.

    When I got home the neighbours thought I was crazy as I stood in the front yard with a garden hose spraying myself in the middle of a downpour. I did find out that the FirstGear Kathmandu didn't leak!
    Ladybug, Macho Man2 and pratered like this.
  19. bwanacswan

    bwanacswan Team Vicarious

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    Don't play cards with a guy named Doc.

    That's all I got....sorry
    whiskeygut likes this.
  20. lhendrik

    lhendrik Putins Puppet

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    When in France in a tiny room in an econo-motel where there is a sink and no toilet in the room, and the nearest toilet is way down the hall, you should know that the last guy in there pee'd in the sink at 3:00am.

    When in a small town in the middle of Turkey checking into the hotel and you ask for hotel parking and the desk guy says, sure, just around the corner in the basement of the next building, rest assured it will be dead-dark, unlocked and a really good place to meet some local talent....

    In almost any Eastern European country away from the city, if you are stopped by the police, and they ask for your US drivers license and registration papers, you can almost be assured they will hold those papers upside down while pretending to read them - make some faces and hand them back to you and send you on your way.
    powderzone and pratered like this.