Best tip I heard lately

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by TUCKERS, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Work on your bike at home. Only then will you know if the expensive Motion Pro tools will do the jobs you bought them for. No use carrying an "x" size wrench if there are no "x" sized nuts and bolts. Or vice versa.

    One of my pet peeves - but this is just me - people who have a metric bike and use SAE fasteners.
    I started with Whitworth, BSF and on the bikes of the time (and still on classics like Norton Commandos etc, BSCycle) UNF\UNC\SAE and before it was properly sorted, several species of metric.
    I guess the other way is not so common.

    My guzzi has only three fastener sizes, most fasteners are socket hex in stainless. There are special sizes, but with three spanners, three allen keys (I only use unbrako), an adjustable spanner and a "c" and spanner, plug wrench I can completely dismantle everything except the gearbox, which needs some peg wrenches, and a large strong arm bar.
    My shitty honda scooter shopping trolley has seemingly thousands of screws to remove to do even simple tasks.

    Some people with the same bike have a box stuffed with tools which they will only be able to use on other peoples bikes - which is very laudable, but the buddies should be prepared too.

    Many parts are often too tight to get undone safely at the side of the road - a bit like the arseholes who use a rattle gun on max to screw up your car's wheel nuts - or loctite! Your significant other may be ballsy enough to try, but those buggers will defeat most of us if we only have the factory wheel brace.
    I also put a smear of anti seize in the appropriate places - there are places where it isn't.

    Remove and refit the parts it is reasonable to have to do at the side of the road. Wheels, fuel tank, seat or get at your air cleaner. Put some thought into what you could do if a shifter or brake lever fails. Can you change your light bulbs... or a throttle cable... replace a chain link...
    None of these are difficult, but trying to work it out at the side of the road\bottom of a gulch at night in the rain...
  2. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Keep 'em coming. Good work guys. I'm picking up tips constantly.
  3. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    If you are going to be riding with someone else, do some ease-in runs, where you can work out each others foibles and see how compatible you are.
    This applies to your own passengers and to riding buddies.

    I have had a couple of passengers who, despite not being featherweight, were un-noticable on the back, other than up long Alpine climbs.
    I have a couple of riding mates who I delight in riding and being with, and am faintly surprised they seem to like being with me.

    My best riding mate is an excellent route selector, good at map reading - makes little notes that he can understand en route, rides at a decent pace, stops more or less when I need a piss. Knows when to call it a day and when a beer is necessary.
    He also rides a guzzi, it's how we met. It is surprising how different our two bikes are, they both started out the same, model and year. Mine has many mechanical and ergonomic changes, his has all different visuals and only a few small tweeks. His is smooth, mine is rorty and there - very eager and responsive. Neither of us have problems with our bikes, because we look after them all year and make sure nothing will break or fall off. Early years each trip produced a wish list of things to change and massage. Now, not so much.

    I don't mind being in front or behind, but my navigation style is non gps, and I usually forget or ignore any map based decisions pretty soon. Probably would drive him crazy if we didn't end up in interesting places, perhaps serendipitously.

    I have also ridden with total twats. Refused to get up, before 11, throwing a dicky fit at the side of the road - much to the amusement of the level crossing attendant, tending her garden while he was screaming and throwing his kit across the road. The "kit" turned out to be a steel barbeque.
    Looking for his ATLAS, he pulled all his panniers out (that he had packed) shouting at his partner about the plastic egg box. She was so stressed and embarrassed, when he eventually decided to proceed, she burnt her leg really badly on the exhaust, he was completely indifferent. It was still grim looking when I saw her again 6 weeks later (a colleague).
    I decided we should split on the second day. Lots of other shitty psychotic behaviour in those two part days.

    People like him need filtering out of your address book.
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  4. b00t

    b00t errrr, yes uh-huh?

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    I work in IS for a hospital system and unfortunately inserting any usb drives other than official is against policy regardless of the situation (They are even trying to phase the official ones out).

    No telling what is on it and it only takes one to infect an entire network and put patient data at risk. This is SOP for any healthcare organization that are stewards of patient data.

    Great idea but the reality of the world we live in.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
  5. tilliejacques

    tilliejacques Been here awhile

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    before removing your backpack with waist strap, unclip the waist strap and clip it together again behind you. That way it's safely out of the way. (This tip is brought to you from inmate Big Sprocket, because I saw him do this on his backpack on a Baja trip and have tried to remember this excellent tip ever since.)
  6. ZiaThunder

    ZiaThunder Go big or go home

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    You'd be better served having it on a laminated card. Keeping it brief and to the point, like allergies and contact info. That's the only stuff that is going to matter in an emergency.

    Just like the others have said, no hospital personnel is going to plug an unknown USB into their system.
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  7. tomass

    tomass Adventurer

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    I have all my Emergency info laser labeled on my helmets, allergies, phone # and blood type.
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  8. ZiaThunder

    ZiaThunder Go big or go home

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    It really doesn't matter if you put your blood type down or not. There isn't a hospital around that is going to take your word for what your type is. You will be typed and crossed before you are given any blood products.

    I've worked in labs (blood banks) for over 20 years, and done the cross matching. In the rare cases of giving blood with out a type/cross you'll be given O neg packed cells. Even then you'll still be cross matched after the fact to see if you were compatible with the cells you were given.
    OnOff, WRW9751, Macho Man2 and 3 others like this.
  9. Andsetinn

    Andsetinn Adventurer

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    This will not work if the phone is locked so also keep other ways of ICE information.
  10. Andsetinn

    Andsetinn Adventurer

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    In case you lose your camera too, if you Email those photos to yourself, for example to Hotmail or Gmail, you can access them anywhere there is a computer with internet connection.
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  11. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    After the "what hammer should I take" thread elsewhere, I realised as I sat scoffing, that both my tents have large loops that you can hook round or place rocks on, rather than having to beat flimsy pegs into the earth's impenetrable crust. So that is today's tip.
    One tent is Norwegian and the other is Swedish. The peg loop design is very different on both, but they end up with a 1" wide strap loop for the peg.

    The old Swedish ridge tent has fixed loops, you can put a half hitch\figure 8 in it anywhere to shorten, that will pull the flysheet down closer to the ground for like huckering.
    Using the whole length allows the flysheet to be higher, giving much more ventilation. The catalogue I got 30+years ago showed blocks of snow used instead of rocks. Not where I camp.

    The Norwegian tent has adjustabuckles - a sort of technosolution to the same problem. Now we are old, we mostly set up a base camp using the Norwegian tent - a lavuu - "our" camp site is high on an exposed ridge in the south of France. Expect the Mistral - a 3 to 5 day blow - at least once a fortnight. It can get quite breezy. I always use rocks because that it what is there, I use the 1st tier guys, but they are fixed to the same rock as the perimeter. The rigging sheet shows all guys set, 16 of them, and to different pegs. Not had a problem yet.
    Lavuu are designed to shed wind, and ours does it very well, allowing the old folk to stand up and get dressed. I think it is intentional, the top or cowl whatever, is adjustable and closeable - onely done that once in a thunderstorm. You can set it to work as an extractor, drawing out the hot air, or have it directing the air inside. There is a mozzie net up there - useful.

    If you know you are going to be in a desert of shifting sand with no rocks, then take sand pegs, pack lighter than rocks. More durable than ice in a desert.

    Anyway, having a way of extending your tent's loops, if doable on your tent, can make rock camping easier.
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  12. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Another limited application.
    Many years ago, decades even, I was in a tiny Camping Municpal in the small provincial French town of Le Donjon. It was, like quite a few obscure little Municipals, in the school yard, and so only open during the school holidays.
    There were showers and proper toilets, which is always a plus. The old "Toilet a la Turk" two footprints are pretty rare these days.
    Being in the old school yard has its advantages, it was a two minute walk to the facilities, ie a range of cafes and bars and restaurants. Important to me in the mornings was an excellent boulangerie, for some of the best croissant I can remember. But I digress.

    Also on site, in fact the only others on the site were a German couple, who had cycled from the north of Germany, to right down to near the Spanish border - quite a long way. Now on their way back.
    Like a few on here, I suffer from back issues, especially sitting on the ground. The German couple had a little harness which converted their thermarest mattress into a little chair - you still sat on the floor, but with a smidge of support for your lower back. Helped enormously - and they very generously let me use one while we shared the site for a day or two.

    Later, I visited the shop in Netherlands where they had bought them from and got one for myself. The addition of my sheepskin made it superluxus.

    While most readers may not have ready access to camping shops in Amsterdam*, my local Aldi had a sort of pre-assembled version on sale last weekend ie it came with the padding\wadding foam fitted. Looked sturdy, folds flat to about 2" thick and maybe 18" square, but very light. I didn't try one in the shop but looked good enough for my size and below (c.210lbs).
    * It was Carl Denig btw, for locals.

    If you have an Aldi near you, you will know how the system works - once they're gone, they're gone. I also know that the UK and German Aldi are not in sync special promotion wise. I don't see why the US should be either.
    You can subscribe to their email flyers to get forewarning of the week's goodies. AFAIK they only do in shop purchases - but the US may have a different system for geo-socio-demographic reasons.

    Almost certainly made in China. At around $15, you expected an Aerostich...
  13. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

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    I periodically see Aldi mentioned, as you've done, as a source for all and sundry goods. I suppose it's a matter of geography. Locally, Aldi is a downmarket food store that requires one to pay .25 cents just to unlock the damn cart (trolley) from the storage station. Customers seeking anything much more than tinned ham are out of luck. But we have Wal-Mart, etc. at our disposal, so life is, uh, good.
  14. OneFaller

    OneFaller Adventurer

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    Key goes in the left glove, gloves go in the helmet.



    Sent from my SM-G900T using Tapatalk
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  15. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Payment and depositing are widely different concepts, with very different results. Your 25c is returned to you - if you take the effort to push the cart back to the park. You can choose to do otherwise, of course.

    Aldi and Lidl, its dopplegaenger and main competitor, work on the low running cost principal. A few decades ago, your perception would have been true here too. Both now have strategies about attracting the middle classes - the car parks are littered with mercedes and bmw's, range rovers and jaguars.
    While they still sell ham in a can, they also sell some very good products, which are better than most other supermarkets. Many of their own brand goods are lower salt and lower sugar than the well known brands.

    I also like the limited range on offer - I can walk in and out with my requirements in 10 minutes - our neighbour hates it for this very reason. She likes to browse shop for hours and collect the "free" shopping points on all the crap she doesn't need, and probably won't use.

    The concept of a grocery store having special promotion, one off events, was according to someone in Germany, started by shops there after WW2.
    Tchibo Coffee, when they had little coffee to sell would fill the shop with alternatives for people to buy. I don't know if Tchibo was the first, but certainly the first one I noticed when I lived there many years ago. I bought my first tent there.
  16. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    'MSR Groundhog stakes" are THE only tent stake. They are like the ROK or RAM of stakes, in a league of their own. You cannot bend them, go ahead try. Also you can get a little short claw hammer from Harbor Fright...it's around 4" total.
  17. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    For you 2 uppers. Measure the inside lid of your top box and go get a cheap mirror from 99c store or Wallysmart.....silicone glue it to the inside of your top box lid....surprise your S.O.!
    Or if they have their own bike even bigger surprise!
    nickguzzi likes this.
  18. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Yes, I can see this would go down well. I tried to persuade the ex to get a crew cut, but no, she wouldn't listen. Spent the entire time complaining about the helmet hair.
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  19. Ladybug

    Ladybug Bug Sister

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    Helmet hair.....Have hated it for 40 years......for years I wore long hair, braided it, put it in pony tails, fought with it...... It took forever to dry after washing it......One day I had my fill of the "work" keeping up with something that rarely looked good due to trying to contain it. Even at work I would pull it back to keep it out of my face. I stopped at a beauty shop one day after work and asked to have my long hair (middle of the back length) cut off super short. Not a buzz cut but short.

    Cutting my hair off was the best and I have not regretted it. It takes 30 minutes to dry naturally after washing, takes a lot less shampoo and conditioner. I still have helmet hair but it's not as bad and can be easily fixed with a few spritzes of water.

    My tip would be embrace the helmet hair, we all have it when we ride.
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  20. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I'm not a slap head as it is known here, I cut my hair back to a number 1 when I am fed up with dealing with it.
    A pre-emptive shave takes place before we leave. 6 weeks later, I am back to normal, apparently.