Best tip I heard lately

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by TUCKERS, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Phaedrus68

    Phaedrus68 Been here awhile

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    Yep. Hair nearly down to my belt for years. Ponytail inside jacket was the only way to manage it. Got it chopped into a spiky short do. Girlfriend came home after work and was all, "oh my god! Are you OK?!" I miss it, but short is so low-maintenance. :thumb
  2. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    Don't buy black, bike, helmet, riding gear, etc. gets way too hot, on a hot day go to a parking lot put your hand on the hood of a black car and then a white car.
    OnOff and nickguzzi like this.
  3. MiamiMotorcyclist

    MiamiMotorcyclist used to be -MiamiUly

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    When I had long hair a zandanna (fabric skull cap) did a great job of keeping that one stray hair from tickling my forehead or eye. Also kept hair looking pretty decent and kept any product and some sweat off my helmet.

    Have short hair now and still use the skull caps just to keep helmet cleaner and it helps keep even the shorter hair from getting too messed up.
  4. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

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    My issue with hair length is how it affects helmet comfort. When shopping, I have to remind myself that today's fit is based on today's hair. I'm not bald; just the opposite. Thick, fast growing mop on top. So my frequency of haircuts, which can vary wildly, has to be put in sync with the helmet that I bought and want to be comfortable wearing. Shoei is the most forgiving, in that respect.
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  5. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    After my face plant in 68, a literal face plant, I couldn't shave for a long time. I guess I just never picked up the habit again.
    For years I wore a Bell Magnum, which was still one of the most comfortable helmets I have had, the only down side was the wind always seemed to find a strand or two of hair to blow up a nostril and tickle the heck out of my nose. I had to remember to snip the 'tash short before a holiday.

    The hair in a pony tail never gave me problems. Summer holidays in Europe, I almost always wore a neck scarf. I managed to keep them reasonably well. The first, a silk one was even a good quality one. The last before the switch to full face is a cheap, hemmed yard square with ying yangs printed on. The thin cotton feels good over the fuzz and is absorbant enough. I wore it bandanna style. It starts off up to my nose, working its way gradually down to my chin. Kept the bugs out of my teeth and reduced the thwack as bubble bees hit my face.
  6. longslowdistance

    longslowdistance Long timer

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    Another tip in the dope slap category (I'm guilty):

    Put in the earplugs before putting on the helmet.
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  7. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    If you have any black leather items you need to revive this stuff is the BEST! One 8oz bottle has lasted me ten years or more. Less than two dollars a year to keep things nice. As claimed it cleans/nourishes/waterproofs/restores color. IMG_1186.JPG
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  8. Paul in Colo

    Paul in Colo Adventurer

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    +1
  9. Paul in Colo

    Paul in Colo Adventurer

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    +1 - I've fallen victim to this "server hiding the credit card under receipts" pitfall.... yes, usually after a few drinks. It's always fun to call the restaurant / bar back the next day saying "I think I left my credit card there."
  10. Paul in Colo

    Paul in Colo Adventurer

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    Losing / leaving things behind:
    - I find that this is most likely to happen when I am rushed... with a group of riders and no one wants to be known for holding up the group. Leaving a gas station or restaurant with a group of riders is where I typically lose stuff / leave it behind. So, knowing this, I am very deliberate about inventorying things (gloves, glasses, wallet, etc.) prior to taking the bike off the kickstand. When riding solo, I have a much better record of not losing my stuff. Hotels - do not put stuff in drawers or anywhere it can be overlooked when you leave. As one other guy wrote (boy scout routine), walking around the hotel room / campsite and double checking for items you might leave behind, has served me well more than once.

    Routines:
    - best piece of advice I have received. Keep things in the same place.... remove and replace - take the guess work out of "where is my stuff." Disruptions to a routine can be a red flag. Don't set things on the top of the gas pump! Put things in your helmet when getting off the bike if possible (gloves, glasses, case, gps, etc.). I have not met the rider who has left without his helmet yet... but would assume it has happened. I have found that keeping my important stuff (wallet, phone, extra key, bike registration, important docs, etc. inside two zip locked bags) in my riding jacket (the same pocket), is not a bad idea. Thinking being, that you normally have your jacket on your person the entire time you are on and around the bike. Zip lock bags are an easy way to keep everything dry and together.

    - have a clean, small cotton wash cloth easily available (tank bag is a good spot). This can serve to wipe moisture, dirt, bugs, etc from your visor goggles. I know a guy who keeps a wet wash cloth in a ziplock bag when he expects to be stuck riding in prolonged, heavy dirt / dust.

    - keep a power bar (yes, sealed and not near its expiration date) / bottle of water with you. You never know when you, or someone with you will need it

    - when riding remote (out of cell coverage, backcountry type stuff), make sure you have a plan ready to activate if you or someone with you crashes (spot, in reach, etc.)... this is worthy of its own thread.

    Thanks for all the tips posted ... I am going to borrow a couple
    pratered likes this.
  11. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Giacomo Agostini's trademark on his race bike was a tennis ball cut in half with a wet sponge in it, fastened to his handlebars.
  12. gsweasel

    gsweasel Just wanna see what's around that next bend...

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    ... why? ...
  13. Valker

    Valker Long timer

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    His ball was half wet??????
  14. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    He used the damp sponge to clean his visor...old days before tear off's.
  15. gsweasel

    gsweasel Just wanna see what's around that next bend...

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    Phew! Thanks.
  16. lopaca

    lopaca Been here awhile

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    On long rides (multi day) we exchange spare keys, copies of health ins cards, passports, drivers license and a list of emergency contact numbers including any allergies to known medications. One or more of us use gps tracking with SOS utility and a sat phone. Probably overkill, but it is what makes us comfortable.
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  17. Mr. Magoo

    Mr. Magoo Bottom feeder

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    My mantra after stops: wallet.keys.phone.
  18. Valker

    Valker Long timer

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    From "World's Fastest Indian"...'Spectacles, testicles, wallet, and watch'.
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  19. MiamiMotorcyclist

    MiamiMotorcyclist used to be -MiamiUly

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    My friend's dad (who made riding possible for me as a kid) used to do that before leaving the house in the early 80's. Never forgot it and now unless I'm wearing contacts, I get to do the same.
  20. Plattypus

    Plattypus ADV wannabe

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    It's a basic thing, but I found it made a big difference when I was out on a trip last month.

    Get ready the night before.

    The morning would just vanish with all the odds and ends of cooking breakfast, cleaning up, changing, choosing what to take that day and what to leave in the tent, etc etc etc.
    I got into the habit of getting everything as prepared as possible before I went to sleep. I'd check the forecast, choose my gear, roughly plan my route and repack my panniers with everything except what I'd need in the morning. Saved hours of dawdling, gained many kms per day, felt way more happy and relaxed as a result :ricky
    ACR, gsweasel, Nickhob and 1 other person like this.