Best tip I heard lately

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by TUCKERS, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. MikePike

    MikePike Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    219
    Location:
    WV/MD
    Ok I don't feel so bad for doing my routine of putting everything into the "correct" pocket after reading some of these.

    When wearing my gear it goes like this:

    Top Left
    Givi key hooked to lanyard hook in jacket
    Wallet
    ICE laminated card

    Top Right
    Cell phone (never in top left because case key could scratch the glass)

    Bottom left
    House keys

    Bottom right
    reserved for bike key when stopping
  2. knight

    knight Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    Oddometer:
    539
    Location:
    Calgary Alberta
    Baby wipes stay moist and are great for cleaning dirty visors, face ,hands and arse
    MerrellJr likes this.
  3. gsweasel

    gsweasel Just wanna see what's around that next bend...

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    95
    Location:
    Fergus, Ontario, Canada
    Some dried out on me once, now I prefer them that way - way lighter to pack (more important for hiking or canoe trips), but easily rehydrate to their previous glory with a splash of water. I always carry some 'dehydrated' ("safe to flush") wipes in a ziplock bag.

    I also carry some of those disposable blue shop towels for use at every meal (or bike once-over) as they are super absorbent and burn easily when finished with them.
    Ladybug likes this.
  4. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,876
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    I use the packages of Grime Boss hand cleaning wipes. Even if not dried out, I add a bit of water to work up a lather. I get them at Home Depot

    [​IMG]
  5. Interceptor

    Interceptor Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    79
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I've been a Paramedic for 27 years and in all that time I have never so much as used a medic alert bracelet while treating someone. Possibly a nurse in the emergency room would use this to find out who you are. A paramedic treating a a rider too seriously to speak simply will not have the time or inclination to load a flash drive.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  6. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,672
    Location:
    below the sea
    Rather than talk about what someone is doing with your protoplasm when you hit the road or scenery, take some time to reduce the possibility of it happening.

    I know there are equivalent tomes in American, but the one I have read, marked and inwardy digested is the UK traffic police "bible" Roadcraft.
    Completely useless for you as we drive on the other side of the road, but it is about defensive driving (it was originally written for police patrol\pursuit drivers) later addenda added bikes. It has been constantly under review since its first edition many years ago.

    The main tenet is "Defensive Riding", being aware of all vehicles around you - even those you may not be able to see, but could be there, because they are out to kill you. It requires lots of concentration, especially at first.
    The basics are observation and road positioning to maximise your sightlines, not riding beyond your visibility, but at the same time "making progress" ie speeding.
    Just in case you got to thinking it was was going to make you slower.

    Stuff which may be alien to some are filtering aka lane spliting, which is something they advocate you should be doing - but not necessarily at elevated mph - but it is all down to the circumstances, not a Bill of "I'm-on-a-bad-ass-bike-so-I-can-do-what-I-like" Rights.
    Riding a bike brings no entitlements, except a trip to A&E or the morgue if you ignore the warning signs.

    Quite a few Police Class 1, the top of the tree boys, take the time - their own free time, unpaid - to share their skills and knowledge through a couple of schemes that I know of.
    Usually a series of one on one, pursuit and debrief sessions. Leading, if you want, to being independantly tested up to the Class 1 standard. Again a 1 hour pursuit and debrief, some in town, some out on highway and some out in the countryside, with high hedges, cow shit, tractors, blind corners, oncoming traffic and lots of things to hit.

    You don't of course have to wait for an English Bobby on a bike to come along.
    upload_2017-7-24_21-12-20.jpeg
    It's your life and body, look after it
    Interceptor likes this.
  7. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    15,694
    Location:
    Villa Maria Sanitarium, Claremont, CA. USA
    Velocette LE on the left. Water cooled...way before it's time.

    Great thread guys. Lots of really useful information.
    nickguzzi likes this.
  8. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,672
    Location:
    below the sea
    Also shaft driven - if "driven" with that power level is the correct word.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  9. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    15,694
    Location:
    Villa Maria Sanitarium, Claremont, CA. USA
    Yeah, you could race them on a push bike...I did.........
  10. XTremeRide

    XTremeRide Ole Soldier

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2014
    Oddometer:
    176
    Location:
    Traffic Central
    Had a career in the military - light fighter (everything on my back). Same at every stop: spectacles, testicles, wallet, and watch. Same on the bike, but check the gas cap. And gloves. And locking the damned pannier lids. :lol3
  11. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    15,694
    Location:
    Villa Maria Sanitarium, Claremont, CA. USA
    I think I've lost everything on your list except the testies.
    Macho Man2 and Kempy like this.
  12. tallpaul63

    tallpaul63 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,528
    Location:
    Redwoods and salty air
    I'm a paramedic. First, I should tell you that I have received no specific training with regard to medical information on thumb drives, or searching for this information on cell phones. I'd advise you to use the KISS principle, and keep it low tech. We will absolutely look for your wallet in the obvious places. If your emergency info is alongside your driver's license, we'll find it there. If you want to use a dog tag or a bracelet with that info, that works. Please don't expect a lot of time to be spent checking for this stuff if you're incapacitated. If the crew is good, they'll be on their way to the trauma center tout suite, and they will be busy.

    Best,

    Paul
  13. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,319
    Location:
    Central fly-over land.
    What about the "emergency" pocket on some riding coats, it has a star-like pattern sewn on it. On my Klim it is on the left sleeve near the wrist. Do 1stR's actually look for that or in there?
  14. ProLeisure

    ProLeisure Gimme shelter...

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    258
    Location:
    Truckee, CA.
    Regarding medical ID info, I made cards for my wife and I using a business card template. One side has medical and contact information and the other side has ‘ICE’ in big, bold red letters:

    Business Card Template:
    http://www.avery.com/avery/en_us/Templates-&-Software/Templates/Cards/Business-Cards/_/template-types-blank/applications-microsoft-word/?N=4294963735+4294965751+4294965754&allref=1

    Then I put the cards in some of these:

    Adhesive Card Holder:
    https://www.amazon.com/C-Line-Self-...coding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=KQRG89GTB2NZRBF8V9B9

    I carry one in my wallet, one in my ‘Medical ID’ pocket on my jacket, etc. I also put one in my pocket when I go mountain biking or skiing.

    I recently posted this in another thread, but here’s another place to store your ‘Medical ID’ info.

    On an iPhone, (and I’m sure other smart phones have a similar feature), you can make your ICE information easily available to others without having to use TouchID or them knowing your phone's password.

    1. Go to the Health app on your iPhone
    2. In the lower righthand corner there’s a ‘Medical ID’ icon
    3. Fill in the ICE contact info

    Now, anyone can access the information when the following screen comes up by touching ‘Emergency’ in the lower lefthand corner:

    [​IMG]


    The following screen will come up, touch ‘Medical ID’ and it will show the medical info you entered in the Health app:

    [​IMG]
    pratered and scootac like this.
  15. tallpaul63

    tallpaul63 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,528
    Location:
    Redwoods and salty air
    Boatpuller- I have the same type jacket. Yes, I would look there. Here's the thing though: this stuff just isn't part of the training curriculum, so we who work in the field just do what's quick and sensible. We always look for a DL, so nested with your license is the best option. It's just paper; easy to put it both places, right?
  16. Andsetinn

    Andsetinn Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 30, 2017
    Oddometer:
    69
    Paramedic or not, in USA I would be afraid of being sued if I handled, let alone accessed the menus in, unconscious persons phone.
  17. ProLeisure

    ProLeisure Gimme shelter...

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    258
    Location:
    Truckee, CA.
    Even in our absurdly litigious society I can't imagine someone being sued for looking for medical contact info on someone's phone who's incapacitated due to injury.

    I've heard a few ER nurses state that looking on a person's phone is one place they look for 'Medical ID' info if they can't find it other places and I want to make it as easy as possible for someone to find that info if needed.

    My 'Medical ID' info on my phone only contains my wife's phone number and states that I'm an organ donor.
  18. tallpaul63

    tallpaul63 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,528
    Location:
    Redwoods and salty air
    I understand your concern. The law has been written to protect people who are trying their best to help in time of need. Look up Good Samaritan laws; they may vary from state to state. Anything is possible, but I wouldn't hesitate, in uniform or not, to do what is reasonable and necessary. If you don't feel comfortable opening up a phone, just leave that to the responders. If you stop traffic, give an accurate report of the accident location, immobilize the rider (avoid movement) and try to stop any serious bleeding, you're a legend in my book.
  19. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,876
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    Go ahead and be afraid, just stand back, stay out of the way, and let we who by our nature have to help, do what we can. That's what most people do anyway.
  20. Andsetinn

    Andsetinn Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 30, 2017
    Oddometer:
    69
    I am afraid :) that you have misunderstood me good sir. I would help, start by calling emergency services, be clear in my description of circumstances (as I have been trained to do), then try to stop the bleeding, if any. I just would not handle the injured persons phone. I would not touch their wallet either.