Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    NoVA for now...
    He did lots of things really wrong in that video. Bit him in the (face) rear hard.

    M
  2. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    NoVA for now...
    28.6mm = steel
    31.8mm = AL
    34.9mm = CF

    *usually

    I've got one 34.9 derailleur and it ain't for sale. :nah I may have an extra clamp for a braze-on if you're still interested

    M
  3. Askel

    Askel Perma-n00b

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    Da UP, eh.

    If custom colors is as weird as you want to get, try these guys: http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com


    They've done a couple of set of wheels for me. They do a good job. And you can choose a lot of different options.
  4. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    What's the scoop on these? Apparently lots of off-road riders are using them. Why are they, and what do you do if you have a puncture?

    :ear
  5. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

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    All my bikes are tubeless. You just pull the valve stem and put a tube in. Do not attempt tubeless without stans rims. I have not had good luck with anything else.

    I have tried bontrager with the plastic rim strip, had a catastrophic failure hopping a log at high speed, blew the tire off the rim.
    I tried Mavic Krsyrium ES road wheels, they work well but if you let them go flat over a month of non-use the bead is really hard to seat again.
    I run stans rims on 4 bikes now. I have burped the tire (where you take a corner too fast or land a jump wrong and pull the bead away from the rim, as soon as I straighten up the bead reseats. I just have to add a little air.
    I am 165 pounds and I run about 22-24psi in my mountain tires and 50-60 in my road tires.
  6. HOT DAMN!

    HOT DAMN! ♪ ♪ ♪

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    Congrats, cool shot! :thumb
  7. rob feature

    rob feature Domain Ranger

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    Most of the shop guys I've talked to say they'll use nothing but tubeless. They claim the weight savings is worth messing with the glue. They also mention the ability to run low tire pressures and say they never ever get flats. Riddle me this though - doesn't the free-roaming sealant you put in there to prevent flats approach the weight of a tube?

    I had tubeless tires on a road bike one time. I managed 2 flats on my second ride and had to call a friend to come get me. The bike was disabled and unfixable in the field - at least by me. I've had a million tube flats out riding and fixed 'em all with a patch in just a few minutes. This was years ago and technology has surely changed, but I don't plan to ever mess with tubeless again.

    For the flats, I started using strips between the tire & tube. I was getting goat's head flats every ride and this totally stopped 'em. It adds a little weight, but I'm in this for the workout as much as anything. Given that I can live with a little extra weight. Of course this won't work for the 'must be as light as possible' crowd. I never understood the lengths to which some people go and the money they'll spend to shave an ounce outside of racing, but to each his own.
  8. Chisenhallw

    Chisenhallw Avowed Pussbag

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    I've narrowed it down to 'earth'. Or 'Baltimore'.
    That's alright, I can't use it. Nashbar & competitivecyclist have 34.9mm Ultegras for sale fairly reasonably. I'm just trying to make sure the 6700 is the successor to the 6500. Maybe it's time to call Shimano again.
  9. dogsslober

    dogsslober No neck tie, Ti neck

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  10. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    I guess that settles it then. I don't race and can fix a flat pretty easily in the field, so for the little weight savings tubeless tires provide, it's probably not worth the hassle.

    Question about fixing flats with patches. Are patches considered a permanent fix, or just a temporary one until you can swap out the inner tube?
  11. Askel

    Askel Perma-n00b

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    Da UP, eh.
    If it holds, it's permanent. If not, it's temporary.

    On tubless, the main advantages are the ability to run lower pressures, and their ability to self seal minor punctures. Less weight is just a minor detail.
  12. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Alex rims are very popular, in the OEM world.

    Yep. Give 'em a call. I'm in there, all the time. They can build anything you want and a lot of their inventory is not listed online. They have over 500 wheelsets.

    In FL, you'll want to go tubeless. My GF and I, both, picked up tons of thorns. Hell, I didn't know Florida had cacti.....stupid me. At the end of everyday, I pulled thorns. I can't imagine running tubes, down there. Be sure to keep a tube, in your kit, for the catastrophic tire failure (torn sidewall, blowout, etc).

    I have had good luck with the Stan's tubeless kit. Make sure to clean the rim surface with alcohol, before installing the rim strip. Also, I put a dab of silicone, around the base of the stem before installing it. So far, no leaks, on two bikes. Your Trek is tubeless ready, so you shouldn't have any problems.

    Also, don't do it for weight savings, faster rollup, lower psi, or anything else performance related. Do it so you're not constantly flatting.
  13. Wadester

    Wadester Rides a dirty bike

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    Some comments on bicycle tubeless:

    1) It is not about saving weight, it's about performance. However, here in the southwestern desert where everything has thorns - the tubed solution was a thornproof tube with sealant. Compared to that, tubeless IS a weight saving. Your rolling resistance drops waaaaay down. Tubeless at 25psi rolls noticeably better than thornproofs at 50psi. It also rolls noticeably better than regular tubes at 50psi. Traction also improves because the tire conforms to the surface better at whatever pressure you like.

    2) Many ways to go tubeless. But not all components play well. Some tires/rims don't work with each other. Notubes/Stan's rims work better than most others. UST rims work best with UST tires, but are pricey. Ghetto/split tube is cheap and works well on most setups.

    3) It's gonna be fiddley. You'll have to mess with something at some point in the process, and if you don't have patience you'll hate it. If you're an experimenter it'll be ok.

    PS: Notubes/Stan's sealant works ok. There are others on the market that also work ok. Making your own is cheaper and longer lasting - as well as potentially better at sealing. See final comment on #3.
  14. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    Cactuses? Can't recall ever having seen one of those here. I thought the only risks I'd be facing are poisonous snakes and gators. :lol3

    A few more questions:

    Should the distance from the seat to the pedals be the same as it is on my road bike? I've noticed that a lot of mountain bikers stand on the pedals in the videos, so perhaps the seat should be lower?

    Pedaling cadence: should I aim for 80-100 rpm, like on a road bike?

    I assume it's possible to get lost if the trail isn't clearly marked. I was thinking of taking along a wrist worn GPS left over from my kayaking days, but I don't know whether the tree cover will block reception. Anyone using these?

    :ear
  15. Gaston Gagne

    Gaston Gagne Past Easy

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    I don't understand the low pressure business with tubeless at all. OK, I get the squishier ride part. I just switched, and all of my pals that were already running tubeless said that I could now run as low as 20 psi. I tried 25. It feels like 25 psi with a tube. The tire rolls over to the side under moderate turning pressure. It slides down off camber surfaces. I bottomed the rim out. I'm running 40 psi again, and I love it. I don't know if it's less weight or what, but my bike rolls much better.

    I will second the Stan's Rims with yellow tape and Stan's juice. I had some difficulty seating the bead with one of the tires, but with a bit of lube (Duh!), it snapped right into place. I had to pump them up twice, and since then I haven't had to touch them. Time will tell.

    On my 26 inch bike, I reamed the presta holes out and ran schraeder with Stan's in it. I just took that bike out for the first time in 10 months and didn't even need to pump up the tires. :1drink
  16. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    You gotta' get off the asphalt to see them. :lol3

    It's whatever feels best to you. Take the appropriate wrench (should have a multi-tool with you, anyway) and adjust on the trail. I find lower to feel better.

    Don't worry about cadence, worry about where you're going. :lol3

    My Garmin picked up, even with the tree cover. It's got to be a pretty thick canopy for it to not track.

    You can run lower pressure without the worry of pinch-flatting a tube.

    Any lower than ~25psi (tubeless) and the tire feels too soft and I can feel the rim bottoming. I do know that I have a lot more traction at 25-30psi than at 40psi.

    It rolls better because you're removing one more layer of rubber that has to flex and eliminating the friction of flexing between the tube and tire.
  17. rob feature

    rob feature Domain Ranger

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    I've yet to lose a Park patch, but have a 3 patch rule. If I've just put number 3 in there, it gets swapped ASAP.

    I keep a good supply of Park GP2 glueless patches on hand. In almost 20 years of mountain biking, I haven't had one fail. And they're soooooooo easy to put on. They're itty bitty too and the glue's already on, so there's no mess. They also come with a little slice of sandpaper and a plastic box it all goes in. It's all about the size of a postage stamp, only thicker.
  18. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    SOP - south of Phoenix, hotter n hell
    One thing about brevets is that it's addicting. I've done two (TWO) events and loved them. Seriously - you have no idea how much fun it can be for me. I don't know if it's the constant monitoring of my intake, the constant route checking, the anticipation of the next control or just a long (somewhat) relaxing ride with my riding buddy. :dunno The next one is a 400-km event this Saturday SaturdaySaturday. Would you believe that we have almost 30 people signed up for this next event?

    If I survive that one, the next event is 600-km in April. A 600-km event has a 40-hour limit which means we can hopefully catch a few hours' sleep that night.

    As I was poking around the webs yesterday, someone posted a note about signing up for the Colorado Last Chance 1200-km brevet. I was vaguely aware of it but didn't know anything specific other than it's in Colorado. duh

    [​IMG]

    This brevet is 1200-km/750 miles in 90 hours which is 3.75 days. The event isn't full yet but it will fill up. It's not the toughest ride either unless you consider 750 miles in less than 4 days to be a killer. I do but what the hell? It starts in Boulder and is an out-and-back heading east into Kansas.

    I sent a note to my riding partner and he's all in - took him 5 minutes to respond. He clearly has more confidence than me. I talked to the wife about it and she's 100% supportive. We've both registered, paid the fees and while our names aren't on the list yet, I'm confident that we'll both have slots.

    To qualify and complete the registration, we have to complete the 400 and 600 rides. Then, I suspect we'll tackle another 600 in June just to gain more experience OR complete the process if either of us DNF the April event.

    Link

    Wish me luck - I could die. :lol3
  19. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Nah. You got it. :thumb

    Having a riding partner who's pretty equal goes a long way toward your success.
  20. rob feature

    rob feature Domain Ranger

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    Y'all roadies are crazy :deal