Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    Odd that you should say that. I shaved over 20 seconds off my best lap time on my favorite local trail just by switching to a 26er. Both my 29er and 26's have carbon fiber frames, and weigh about the same (~27 lbs), but the amount of inertia those big 29er wheels produce makes the bike feel much more sluggish during rapid directional changes. I really want to love the 29er, but the 26er is a much more enjoyable and engaging ride.
  2. brewer90

    brewer90 Been here awhile

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    I can easily see feeling that way. I do get that sluggishness too when I try to rapidly accelerate out of a slow section. In order to get the faster time I had to change my riding style and start carrying more speed through the corners in order to keep my momentum up and keep those big wheels rolling. We have a lot of rocks out here so the big wheels help on that too which is one of the reasons I switched.
  3. TheNedster

    TheNedster Lurkapotamus

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    I quit riding my 26er once I got my 29er. Having re-entered cycling 3-4 yrs. ago on a 'cross bike, I feel like I've learned to better manage the larger wheels on the trail. It's faster and less tiring for the type of riding I do- mostly XC type stuff. To be fair, it is slightly lighter than the old 26er with much better componentry (2X10 kicks ass!). I sent the 26er to go live with my brother last weekend.
  4. Phunkshun

    Phunkshun ...Uh....yeah....right???

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
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    122
    Location:
    Cairns, FNQ, Australia
    [​IMG]

    This isn't mine but same spec as this one, weighs a ton, 8ichs travel front and rear and rides smooth as.

    haven't read through all these posts but just seeing how many other DH guys are out there
  5. Lewy

    Lewy Minus the LC8

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    Another Go Pro filmed video from and early morning ride on Sunday.

    This time on my Reign.

    <IFRAME height=315 src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qO4okigWLIk" frameBorder=0 width=560 allowfullscreen></IFRAME>
  6. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    I get the part about having to carry more speed into the turns on the 29er. But here's the problem I've had doing that: if I don't know the trail like the back of my hand, and can't see all the way through the turn, I have no way to anticipate what I'll encounter once I'm in it. Modulating my speed to make rapid course and speed adjustments in response to changes in terrain is much easier with the 26er's lighter wheels and quicker steering. The same thing happens in steep hill climbs, where you can rocket upwards only to find that your path takes you straight into a big rock or root that you couldn't see from below, or that the trail suddenly makes a sharp turn at the top. This happens all the time on the Red trails at Santos, or the steep climbs at Chuck Lennon. Having ridden those same trails on both bikes, there is no doubt in my mind that the 26er turning quickness and ability to accelerate and stop faster were a huge benefit. And when you're 51 years old, you really come to appreciate the 26er's plush 6" suspension travel when going off drops. Trust me. :D
  7. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Never said it wasn't. ...but but its easier on equipment and your wallet if you do.

    Take my buddy on the 29er who dinged his rim on a rock but I didn't (on my 26er) its all about picking lines and riding smoothly. :nod Luckily, he got the rim straightened back out for free, if he hadn't Reynolds rims aren't cheap!

    M
  8. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    I've been told repeatedly by 'people in the know' that a 26" rim can handle a lot more impact than a 29" rim. From a structural standpoint, it's not hard to see why, but I wonder just how big a difference there is. The dealer had no problem when I suggested I might eventually try the 10' drops at Santos on my 26er, but warned that doing anything like that on the 29er would likely result in structural failure and void the warranty.
  9. Blur

    Blur 3MTA3

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    Not the rim, the wheel as a whole.... due to the length of the spokes....

    And there is a big hit, DH 29'er.... made by Devin Lenz.... the Lenzsport PBJ
    29" wheels, 7 inches of travel..

    [​IMG]
  10. Offblnz

    Offblnz Long timer

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    Cool maps. How hot does it get out there now?

    Most important tip I got from pro racers are "miles not speed, makes you fast!" so be easy on yourself and try to enjoy it without taking the last 10 miles home in an whambalance:lol3

    I have just now started up again. I got so tired of the way people were treating bicyclist and how the roads got worse and worse (potholes deep enough for spelunking:lol3) so I stayed with my motorcycle. At least you can accelerate out of trouble on those. But I've been riding since I was a kid and I really miss it when I don't, so I'm back and have found a route that's okay for now. Problem is, it's tourist season here in Maine soon and that means car drivers from other parts of the US whom are not, how should I put it, proficient, yeah, good word, whom are not proficient in controlling a vehicle on narrow roads while looking at our breathtaking scenery.
    But, I'm back and I'm taking it easy because I don't want to break something (I'm getting older) and because I would like a full season with lots of miles and smile.:lol3 I would like a new bike though, my Cannondale is 11 years old, looks new, but, you know....:D
  11. Tallbastid

    Tallbastid Let's get tropical

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    Was granny gearing up my favorite trail last week, very steep and rocky. Heard metal break, pedals kept moving but I stopped moving. Ended up blowing out my freewheel hub. Bike is now in the shop... Worth upgrading to a better freewheel for around two hundred bucks?? This is a 2012 giant reign 2, not clear yet if giant will warranty the hub, but my thought is if it has happened once, it will again if I go back to the stock hub.


    Favorite thing I've ever bought:
    [​IMG]

    Extras include shorter stem, wtb seat, wider and higher rise bars, platform pedals, dh inner tubes.
  12. brewer90

    brewer90 Been here awhile

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    Nice bike. Looks like it would soak up everything.

    I'm a big fan of Chris King hubs but they are spendy. Hope hubs are pretty bombproof but they are the straight pipes of the bike world. Loud hubs saves lives! I have two friends that have been riding them for a couple of years with zero issues. You can get a rear Hope Pro II for $170 delivered from wiggle.com in the uk with free shipping vs mid $200s from US stores. Or you can go with an XT hub which is a step up the food chain from what you have now and I bet your shop has it in stock.

    What type of hub are they suggesting? Does the $200 include rebuilding the wheel or is that the hub price?
  13. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    That frame looks like it's built for an elephant. :huh
  14. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    n00b question: what is a freewheel hub, and how do they break? I've heard of people breaking chains, but never hubs.
  15. Tallbastid

    Tallbastid Let's get tropical

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    Hey man, thanks for the reply. The XT hub is what they were suggesting, and the $200 includes rebuilding the rear wheel with that hub, or $75 for the stock free hub with a rebuild. I would upgrade to a Chris King or similar, but I'm really just looking for something that won't break again anytime soon, I've spent enough cash on this bike as is. :deal Would you say the CK is worth the price? I was really hoping to spend money upgrading brakes before a freehub. Elixir 1s suck!
  16. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    You can find a decent rear wheel on ebay or CL for way less than $200. If you weren't running discs, I'd sell you my wheelset. Cross-somethings-Ceramics. They're the Cross?Country? because they've got steel not AL spokes.

    ...but you're running discs, so that's out.

    I'm a fan of loose ball hubs. Keep em maintained and they'll outlast your bike. Ain't that right Mr Head? :evil

    M
  17. Tallbastid

    Tallbastid Let's get tropical

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    Gummee, won't most wheels on ebay or craigslist have similar (lower) strength hubs?
  18. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Depends on the wheelset.

    M
  19. Wadester

    Wadester Rides a dirty bike

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    For Shimano hubs, you can replace the freehub body:
    [​IMG]

    It's held onto the hub by a hollow allen bolt (10mm?). You have to pull out the axle and bearings, then unscrew the bolt. After that, you drop the replacement on and reassemble. IIRC, there are only a couple of options for shimano freehub bodies - but they are fairly durable. You broke the "dog"s, but they probably trashed the springs and damaged the pockets in the center section.

    Here's the DIY: http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html#transplant
    [​IMG]


    I broke a DT hub this way once, but it failed due to heat treat issues and was warrantied. Got a new hub - I did the wheelbuild. The shimano freehub failures I've seen have all been due to lack of maintenance over time - and it's a PITA to get to the ratchet on these. Best bet is a Morningstar Freehub Buddy, which allows you to push solvent or lube thru the freehub and take care of the ratchet and the two sets of loose ball bearings in there. But you have to strip it down just as far to maintain it as to replace it.
  20. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Long timer

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    3737 as of this morning's ride. 477 in May! Highlights included a 75 mile day and an impromptu 1 hour time trial (I got a late start this morning) that netted me 19.25 miles. I'm at 1387 for 2012. I should be at 1458, but goddammit, that's progress! As far as my 1012 goals, a century is looking pretty damn doable. My 3500 mile goal looks legit, barring disaster. 20 miles in an hour is still looking pretty sketchy. I can cruise along OK between 19 mph and 20 mph, but someone drops a load of bricks on me at 20.1.