Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. brewer90

    brewer90 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Oddometer:
    604
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I've had my CKs for 4 years. I originally had them in a 26er wheelset and then used them for my 29er build. They have been great. I had to adjust them once during the first month as they broke in and I haven't touched them since. They are worth it if you are going to keep them for a long time. If you are just trying to get your bike going again and want something you don't have to worry about I'd say the XTs are good enough.

    However Gummee brings up a good point about ebay. I would get your existing hub fixed under warranty and then sell the wheelset. You can find a complete front and rear wheelset for $200 with XT hubs. Velocity and Mavic rims are good. DT Swiss wheelsets are good too. I would stay away from complete Mavic wheelsets though. They look cool but I broke several spokes (proprietary spokes) and my buddy trashed his freehub three times.
  2. zippy

    zippy Hinter dem Feld

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
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    2,315
    Location:
    St Pete
    Went up to Ohio to see my nephew off to the air force this past weekend. For the heck of it I tossed the poprad into the trunk of the rental car. Stayed in Fancy Gap Virginia thursday eve and was hoping to pedal a bit of the blue ridge friday morning. But there was pea soup fog when I woke up friday. Got a couple rides in around my parents house in Ohio. Was nice to pedal the roads I did as a youngster. Even found a gravel rail trail while out on a road ride that was a nice change. The rolling hills were kicking my arse good. Note to self do not eat a Mr Hero Romanburger a few hours prior to pedaling...
  3. Mr Head

    Mr Head PowerPoint ADV

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    Once upon a time I raced bicycles and was pretty good at training and not so much at the racing part since I'd used up my competition gene somewhere around 13. I started racing bicycles in my early 30's. I was lucky to be in Colorado and because I began from working as a motorcycle marshal with the Coors Classic I gained access to a lot of great information and training. That made for learning not only how to train but how to recover from training and injury. I got to ride with some pretty special folks and got a lot of great advice, training direction and how to set a bicycle up and why.
    All that, as well as growing up a snow skiing and racing those and playing football. Football was stupid except for some of the conditioning, I learned soem stuff there. the rest of it was and is about the worst thing you can do to a body. But, I'll not climb too high on that horse.

    The trick I know is that with my age, (59) recovery takes longer. and if I rush things it just makes it ultimately take even longer and hurt more.
    So, yes I'm back to time in the saddle but at a sustained effort. Right now I try to keep my speed down around 15 mph for the first half hour to get good and warm. And chase as few rabbits as possible. That means I can stay in the saddle longer.

    Monday was said to be mid 80's, but felt like 90's. I've ridden in over a hundred but being in condition makes a huge difference. When I was racing heat didn't bother me. I liked it hot and dry I seemed to ride a lot harder then.
    The tough part in recovery is holding back. Right now I am real weak compared to where I was before my back went nuts. My back is just OK to ride not perfect so even pushing a little is a bad thing. The PT I was doing was useless. The usual hot pad with that electric muscle twitch thing. They added some homework, yoga stretches which are the only useful part of the program. I stopped going, I know I need to strengthen my core, but to do that I need to get my cycling back a good bit, with some walking at lunch and after work during the week. eventually I'll get back to riding the big hills and running. THat stuff builds my core back.

    I am so far amazed that my so called "Cadillac Insurance" plan always finds useless stuff like this here. In Colorado I had basically the same thing with an HMO from BCBS Colorado so I went to my old sports medicine PT shop and paid cash. That was good stuff. They actually did sports work not some crystals and newage noise aroma therapy garbage.
    My plan is to go on my own dime to a sports medicine doctor in Newport Beach a friend has used for opinion. Then I'll take a swipe at the insurance company.
    In Colorado before I had the crappy HMO, I told my GP I wanted to go to Andy Pruit for an evaluation of my knee, and PT, and bike re-set. My doc didn't know of Andy so I showed him, pointing out the miles I put on the bike. he agreed and went to bat for me with the insurance company. I got re-habed and my bike set up and some home PT to do. A month later I was back in the saddle doing good miles. I'd blown up my bad knee at a timetrial where the wind kicked up big after the turn around.

    So, now I'm back to slow and steady again. I will get back to all day in the saddle at a reasonable clip, and not feeling like I've been beaten afterward. Just takes some time. And I got some of that for now.
  4. lovish

    lovish Adventurer

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    60
    Location:
    Hogwarts
    Thank god bicycles are still alive on this world full of petrol running beasts


    My Signature

    -------------------------------------
    One day, I will take it easy. Today won't be that day...
    -------------------------------------
  5. Mr Head

    Mr Head PowerPoint ADV

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    Unfortunately I am still putting more miles on the gas-burner than on the fat burner.
    For May I manage 103 miles on the bike once I got the OK from the doc.
    So a little under 500 so far for the year. Nowhere near what I expected back in January.

  6. HOT DAMN!

    HOT DAMN! ♪ ♪ ♪

    Joined:
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    Hammond, IN.
    Upgrade.

    What is your current repair stand of choice for the home shop? :ear
  7. Blur

    Blur 3MTA3

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    Location:
    Qualia
    Topeak Elite

    [​IMG]
  8. Askel

    Askel Perma-n00b

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    Da UP, eh.
    Turn bike upside down and set on the floor. :D
  9. HOT DAMN!

    HOT DAMN! ♪ ♪ ♪

    Joined:
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    Hammond, IN.
    :lol3

    I'm looking to upgrade. :D
  10. brewer90

    brewer90 Been here awhile

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    604
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Feedback Sports Pro Elite but it's hard to go wrong with Park Tools.

    [​IMG]
  11. HOT DAMN!

    HOT DAMN! ♪ ♪ ♪

    Joined:
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    Great choices guys. I was also looking at the Park PCS 4 in that range ($200) but am not sure of the feet. I like the stability of the tripod feet on both the units suggested above, Topeak and Feedback for breaking loose stubborn pedals or bottom brackets.

    Anyone with the Park who can attest to the stability?

    [​IMG]
  12. mud

    mud I just wander.....

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    Location:
    Roseville, MN
    The nice thing about the elite is that it will fit fork tubes...... You know, for motorcycles.:evil
  13. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    NoVA for now...
    I've got Performance's version of that. Works very well too, but the Elite works that much better.

    M
  14. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    An option if you have a good/heavy work bench and vise in your shop.

    [​IMG]

    I used to have one of the cheapie floor stands but it seemed flimsy and unstable. Instead, I took a Park PCS-12 bench mount stand, mounted it to a wood plate with a clamping member, and then use my long roll-around bench and woodworking vise to create a repair stand that is very stable. Also nice to be able to unclamp the apparatus and put it on the shelf without having to disassemble anything.

    - Mark
  15. zippy

    zippy Hinter dem Feld

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    I have that exact model bought used off CL. No issues with stability whatsoever.
  16. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    Location:
    SOP - south of Phoenix, hotter n hell
    I have the PCS-10 which appears to use the same clamp:

    [​IMG]

    Good stand.
  17. Mr Head

    Mr Head PowerPoint ADV

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    I made my stand in college as a project. I needed a stand and I needed to use a buckling analysis program I'd written so I came up with a win-win.

    [​IMG]

    Cost me about $100, but I got engineering credit and impressed the hell out of the professor when I fired up this huge antique arc welder. Part of the $100 was for a helmet and appropiately sized rod. I didn't know how to weld but went to the welding supply shop and talked to a guy. The cables to the clamp and rod holder were about 3/4in in diameter. The floor vibrated pretty good in the engineering shop when I fired it up.
    I tried a couple of test parts then practiced some more on other peoples projects who were afraid of the welder.

    Oh, and I found the manual for the thing in the school library. Good place for it. Morons.

    Another student and I also used the lathe.
    Mine turned out pretty rough, but if I'd had the shop I built once I got out of school and got a job I would have rocked it.
    As it is 25 years later or so I still use it though most of the time it holds my hydration pack and keeps that part of the garage floor from moving around too much.:lol3
  18. Schnickelfritz

    Schnickelfritz pick, grin, repeat

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    I've always liked the bench clamp, but if stability is important and you're looking around $200 price point, check out the Park PRS-20 or its lightweight counterpart the -21 (+ $50). Rear or front dropout mount, 360-degree rotation, folding/portable and super duper rock solid. The alleged weight of my steel one is 21 lbs but it feels a lot heavier. The alum model is 13 lbs.
  19. Blur

    Blur 3MTA3

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    Jun 2, 2010
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    Location:
    Qualia
    Here ya' go, ya' cheap bastards......






    [​IMG]









    (Just kidding. Only posted this pic so y'all could have a laugh)
  20. melville

    melville Long timer

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    1,522
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    Behind the Redwood Curtain
    Get a real stand and it's useful for MC work as well:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Mr Head--I'm assuming that's the real thing? Sweet! Whose was it?