Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. pierce

    pierce Aven'Tourer

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    I don't think drivetrain efficiency is nearly the factor in mountainbiking that it is i roadbiking. there's far more rolling resistance, you're usually pedaling at lower speeds, and the only time you're going fast is downhill.
  2. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    I think you're right. Road biking involves traveling long distances at relatively high speeds, and the bikes themselves are made so super-efficient nowadays that the tiniest factor like a dirty chain can make a measurable difference in performance. Not so with mountain bikes, where variables like terrain, tire pressure, tread pattern, suspension, etc., make a far greater difference than a bit of sand on the chain will.
  3. djb_rh

    djb_rh Been here awhile

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    "A bit of sand"? How about repeated immersion in water and mud?

    Part of why drivetrain loss was so small was attributed to running 52 front sprockets, too. My 1x10 bike has a 30T front. That's a pretty big difference.

    And while by percentage of overall bike efficiency the drivetrain might not be as significant as in road biking, the simple fact is that power loss is power loss, and if the drivetrain is TWICE as inefficient as a road bike, that could be VERY significant in 100 mile XC races, for example.

    The reason I ask is to understand if just maybe it's worth it to stop and clean and lube the chain in that kind of environment, or if perhaps the gain isn't offset by the time loss of doing the maintenance. It only takes 60 seconds and most, and if you're talking about doing it after 40 miles of a race at an aid station right before a 10 mile long nearly 3,000 foot climb (which is something that happens at Leadville, for example), it might just be worth it.

    Again, I don't understand why OTHER inefficiencies of MTB have ANYTHING to do with this. I mean if THAT mattered, then I'd argue that the fact that you go "so fast" on a road bike means your drivetrain efficiencies aren't a big deal because aero drag is so much larger in comparison to your road bike. But that makes just as little sense.


    --Donnie
  4. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    If we're talking about racing 100 miles on a mountain bike, then I would certainly spend the time to make certain the bike is operating as efficiently as possible. That hasn't the vaguest resemblance to the kind of trail riding I and most people do, however, where factors such as tire choice, tire pressure, and suspension settings yield far more tangible results than a perfectly clean and lubed chain.
  5. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    3ish hours on the Full Tilt Boogie today with some buddies. Did a few loops around The Plains, VA and up and over Bull Run Mtn. Mostly dirt roads. :ricky

    I gotta tell ya. Tubulars sure do ride nice. Even when they're pumped up to 40-ish psi!

    M
  6. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    after taking jon for a spin yesterday i just commuted 9 miles rountrip to work

    i can't wait for things to cool off ... it's been a brutal summer here
  7. FinlandThumper

    FinlandThumper Has Cake/Eats it Too Super Moderator

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    Next week I will hit 1000 miles on the new Marin since April. Not bad since i didnt ride it at all in july since i was on summer vacation.

    It's been a beautiful summer, and a thousand miles more than I rode last year. :D

    I plan to set it up with studded tires and continue through winter. Lots of folks manage it here so I figure, why not me too? At this rate I will have another 700 miles by christmas.
  8. FinlandThumper

    FinlandThumper Has Cake/Eats it Too Super Moderator

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    General question.

    I want to get some clip in pedals which also work with regular shoes. Am I right that any pedal labelled as "spd" is what I am looking for?
  9. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    G
    I have shimano m520 pedals amd their cleats on two different pairs of shoes. M520are gemerally the least expensive yet still last you mamy years. I have a pair od specialized sjoes and a pair of addidas. Spd is the generoc for receeded cleat. I use those shoes everyday at work.
  10. rbrsddn

    rbrsddn 3banger

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    I've got a set of Nokian studded tires for my Mtn Bike, and the traction on ice is amazing! I hope we have some real winter this year, so I can use them. Last winter was too warm.
  11. Chisenhallw

    Chisenhallw Avowed Pussbag

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    Yes. For my urban thrasher bike, I work with <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1345298528&sr=8-8&keywords=spd+pedals+shimano">these</a> & <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-iZUMi-X-Road-Cycling-Silver/dp/B002L3S1PU/ref=sr_1_24?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1345298557&sr=1-24&keywords=pearl+izumi+shoes">these</a>. I like the pearl izumi's - I can wear them all day long with no ill effect. But they do run small. I'm a euro size 43, and I bought a 44. They were snug until I stretched them out.
  12. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    fixt

    Anything labeled 'spd compatible' will work with mtn shoes. Chosing a pedal is like 'which oil should I use?' discussions. I've had ATACs, Speedplays, and now SPDs. They all work.

    One bit of advice: if you are going SPD stick with the Shimano pedals. The nicer the better. IOW XT pedals are going to last longer and work better than 520s. XTR will do better than that... etc

    HTH

    M
  13. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Yes and no.

    SPD (Shimano Pedaling Dynamics) is actually a Shimano abbreviation for their style of pedal. Generally, any shoe that is labeled "SPD compatible" will work with most SPD and mountain bike pedals. Your commnonly available SPD style pedals are going to be the least expensive way to get into clipless (meaninig no toe clips) pedals.

    However, I prefer the ease and smoothness of Crank Brothers pedals. Time Roc is, also, much smoother than SPD style pedals. If you look at an SPD pedal, you'll see that it relies on the cleat fitting within notches of the mechainism. Crank Brothers and Time, both, retain the cleat with springs that have no notches and therefore allow the cleat to float and have a much easier release. There is no notchiness with them.

    I'd recommend finding a shop that stocks a variety of shoes and pedals. Find shoes that are comfortable and, then, try the different styles of pedals with those shoes. If the shop won't allow you to test their stuff, find another shop. Also, don't allow the shop to talk you into a stiff, racing style shoe, as they're just not worth the tradeoffs in a day-to-day environment.
  14. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    I run Nokian W240. They're brilliant. Unfortunately, they do nothing against the snow drifts. :lol3

    A lot of studded tire info here.
  15. LoJack

    LoJack Long timer

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    Shimano does make a two sided pedal that has SPD on one side and a normal "Platform" on the otherside if you wish to be able to used different shoes. They are pretty decent pedals.

    +1 on Crank Brothers, though. I have been using them for a while and like them. You can get pedals that have a platform the surrounds the clip-in part (from a number of different companies) and that may work for you, but it's never a sure footing if you aren't clipped in.

    Oh, Peter White. I wish that crotchety man would hire someone to make him a new website.:lol3
  16. rbrsddn

    rbrsddn 3banger

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    I've been using the Time Atac's for years, and really like them. They are easy to ride around with sneakers if you want.
  17. pierce

    pierce Aven'Tourer

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    speaking of pedals, and resuming my earlier thread of platforms, I ended up ordering a pair of Wellgo B67's from fleabay.

    [​IMG]

    these sound like they are better than the sunringle's I had, and cheap enough for me. I'm not hucking or jumping or even single tracking on this bike, so I don't need bombproof stuff. I saw several suggestions in online reviews to locktite the pins, so I'll likely do that, and since i'm NOT hucking, I'll probably smooth the tops of the pins off a bit with my dremel.
  18. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    My GF has a set of those. She's always looking down, upon takeoff, trying to get them flipped to the side she wants. Looks like a PITA, to me. Likewise, her resisting to try anything else. I just ride my bike and leave hers up to her. :evil
  19. LoJack

    LoJack Long timer

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    Ha, that's funny. I've never used them, just have a few friends that do. I guess I don't know if they have issues with them, they just seem decently made.
  20. pierce

    pierce Aven'Tourer

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    indeed, pedals that have to be right side up, meh. and I've seen some that are like a 'bear paw' around a SPD on both sides, and been told that they are really hard to snap into with cleats.

    I'm sticking with pin platforms like the ones I pasted above from now on for anything other than a full out roadbike.