Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    Clement was my favourite at home and in the shop. I never had or knew of one that failed, but I know it can happen. You needed to be like Merckx and dump water on your tires as you descended!


    When I was at the US Olympic Training Center in about 1989, they used a 3M product which I think was used for automotive trim--- somethingbond. It did fail more than once and the one time I was able to see the tubi afterward the adhesive had failed cleanly, staying with the tire but none of it remained on the rim.
  2. fullmonte

    fullmonte Reformed Kneedragger

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    Back in the day when I was young and naive (before motos and ATTGATT), I used to regularly hit 67-68 mph (according to the calibrated cyclo computer)on a steep hill in Roanoke county, VA called the Wall. The fun part was at the bottom of the descent, the road went into a nice right hand sweeper that would cause you to drift over the double yellow into the oncoming lane, just a couple inches.:eek1 Talk about a rush. None of the guys I rode with exceeded the low 60's, but they weighed less and used their brakes (brains).:D
  3. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Fastack. Works really well if it absolutely HAS to be glued on RIGHT NOW. Dries quickly. Like in 20min quickly. Only problem is when you go to take the tire off, the base tape usually stays with the rim. AMHIK

    ...and while I don't condone this:
    [​IMG]
    I completely understand it

    M
  4. melville

    melville Long timer

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    Kinsman Notch, NH Hwy 112 going East--12% for 2 miles, wide open. Went down that one with a big guy, and he said his CateyeMate showed 65 the last time I slingshot-passed him.
  5. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    SOP - south of Phoenix, hotter n hell
    I did a Texas hill country tour in 1979 with two other riders. They were on a Schwinn Paramount tandem - these guys were twins and they were outstanding riders. Back then, Whit Snel had the Schwinn franchises in San Antonio (owns Bike World today) and these guys both worked for Whit.

    When we were going down hill, that tandem would take off like a locomotive going downhill. Often, when we'd hit a big hill, I'd reach over and grab their rear rack. It was like the hand of God was giving me a shove. I must have been more stupid back then than today - inches away, one hand on my bike, the other holding on to a tandem.

    Sheesh.... that was fun. :wink:
  6. Birdmove

    Birdmove Long timer

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    That is amazing. I just have a mountain bike, and it certainly is geared pretty low. Going down a hill in the highest gear and pedaling as fast as my 59 year old legs could go, I hit 26+ mph according to my bike computer. I only ever use the 7 highest gears, and where I ride I never even have to stand up going up the long, but not too steep hills. When I wear out the sprockets and chain, maybe I'll go to different gearing for some more speed.




  7. zouch

    zouch part-time wanderer

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    i tried Fastak when it was the craze back then, but it didn't seem like it did as good of a job holding more than just the rim tape on, and didn't leave much stickiness available for the rare occasion that i had a flat and needed to swap in a pre-glued spare,... i never rolled a sew-up, but a housemate of mine did, and i didn't want to wait until it happened to me.

    once i discovered Continentals and the matching Conti glue, the only other flat i ever had was due to a wood screw i picked up in a sidewall that no tire would have survived. (this sucker actually dinged a chainstay as it turned past it.)
    Contis weren't cheap, but they rode like they were made for a God (which i certainly wasn't, though i appreciated the ride!). after using them for a while i had so much confidence in them that i wouldn't change them out until i saw cord, even if they looked like cheese graters.
  8. zouch

    zouch part-time wanderer

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    i think you might have your hi/lo gearing mixed up; just like on a motor vehicle, lo gears to go up hill, high gears coming down.

    nonetheless, don't expect to see as high a speed descending on a MTB as you would on a proper road bike; the fatter/chunkier tires, flat bar and upright riding position are all working against you in wind and rolling resistance.

    much to the chagrin o' many a squid, on a good road-racing bike on a steep twisty descent, i'm likely to be able to keep up with and pass sport motos, mostly due to the ability to brake harder and later before turns. knowing this always spooks me when i'm working Moto Ham at an event, since i'm fully aware of how fast a road bike can actually corner, and how hard it actually is to stay out of the way.
  9. rbrsddn

    rbrsddn 3banger

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    Kinda off topic, but I just slapped a new chain on the skinny bike, and noticed the 53 T ring was a bit hooked. I have DA 7700 cranks that are still in good shape, except the clear coat has cracked in places. I replaced the rings 3 or 4 years ago, and need the big again. Does anyone have one, or know anyone that does? TIA!:D
  10. zouch

    zouch part-time wanderer

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    haven't got one, but am curious why you'd be wearing out the 53 so relatively fast; spending too much time on the 53t while on the large [edit: not "small", doh!] cog(s)?


  11. pierce

    pierce Aven'Tourer

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    I don't remember the names, geez its been like 30 years, but the glue I used was like a rubber cement and stayed sticky/rubbery, while the other was red and dried to a fairly hard crust. the red stuff was better for hot inland conditions, but in cool coastal California I usually used the rubbery kind as you could slap a spare on the rim without regluing on the side of the road, as long as you took it easy on the turns. There was a different glue we used to glue the rim tape to the carcass.

    I quit running tubulars when A) I was spending more time on my first generation mountain bike, and B) the clement factory had a big fire or something, and their classic setas became unobtanium. I'm reading now that Pirelli had bought them, and moved their production to Thailand, whihc no doubt contributed to their oblivion, but someone recently acquired the rights to the name, and is makign Clement tires again... in Thailand :-/
  12. pierce

    pierce Aven'Tourer

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    isn't the big ring where you BELONG when you're on the small rear cogs? its small+small (and big+big) that you want to avoid.
  13. rbrsddn

    rbrsddn 3banger

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    I spend a lot of time in the big ring(When I'm fit), but think I'm pretty good at selecting the right ratio. Maybe some of the teeth are supposed to be pre curved for shifting or something, because overall it looks pretty good. It certainly shifts like buttah.:deal Chains are easier to find anyway...
  14. Mr Head

    Mr Head PowerPoint ADV

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    Shifters,
    [​IMG]
  15. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Modolo. Sez so right on the left shifter body.

    I did 3:23 on the mtn bike today. B was riding his fixed gear so I tried to keep it in roughly the same gear he was in. Tough when he's on a 29er and I'm not. :nod I was either half a gear too low or half a gear too high. Legs are toast. Again.

    Getting ready to ride my brand spankin new HTC One X fell out of my pocket. Guess who's got a no-longer-brand-spankin-new phone? You know... the one with all the glass on the front that's now shattered! Yeah. Fun stuff. :bluduh

    M
  16. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Some teeth are shaped different than others, to help pull the chain up onto the big ring. I doubt they're actually hooked, but, probably machined/twisted. Look to see if those oddball teeth are located adjacent to the pins/ramps on the backside of the big ring. If so, then, you know they're supposed to be shaped that way.

    Notice the shape of those teeth by the pins and ramps?
    [​IMG]
  17. pierce

    pierce Aven'Tourer

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    also note there's a few variations on this theme, depending on who made the crankset/chainrings and when.
  18. rbrsddn

    rbrsddn 3banger

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    I took a better look, and there is plenty of meat on the teeth. I replace chains every 3-4,000 miles, so it's not a worn chain that would be doing it. I'll ride a few thousand more, then check it out. I'd still like to find a spare ring, just to have it ready. 7700 stuff is getting scarce.
  19. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

    Joined:
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    put something on and stay in that position.
    Clement tires made in Thailand... Wtf. I used Clement and Tubasti-- anyone remember that stuff? Everyone called it tubastige but it did a good job. I just thought Clement left a better base for changing a tire on the road and a better base for future installs.
  20. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

    Joined:
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    There's been a few studies done over the years on tubular glue. Vittoria Mastik 1 always tops the list with Conti's glue coming in a close second.

    Buddy of mine gave me a pot of the Vittoria glue before the season started. I've already used half of it!

    [​IMG]

    No weenie little tubes for THIS cyclocrosser! :nono

    M