Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. ImaPoser

    ImaPoser adventure imposter

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    Holy crap! a January ride in full summer gear and conditions? :clap

    Yes, I was slow. :lol3
  2. Crocodile Tears

    Crocodile Tears Anti-Semantic

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    :lol3 :nod

    I had the specialized, bandit, and KLX out today around Toledo. 60 degrees :huh?

    I'm slow too. Well except for the B12S :evil
  3. fullmonte

    fullmonte Reformed Kneedragger

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    It took 52 minutes and 9.25 miles of mud to get the bike this grungy, but at 70 degrees I'll take it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    It took well over an hour with the garden hose and air compressor to get my kit clean afterwards.:D
    [​IMG]
    Worth every minute.:freaky
  4. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    If you have never ridden rollers at all and you're nervous about falling, find yourself a doorway. Most rollers will fit in the doorway and you want to place the rollers so that your elbows, rather than your bars, are near the doorframe. If you feel yourself getting wonky or you fear you'll tip, just use your elbow to gently guide yourself back into position.

    I have used this technique with every person to whom I have ever sold new rollers, and it works every time. Then you can move to a wall, and use the other fellows suggestion of placing a chair, just in back of the bars, so you can grab hold and help yourself getting started and stopping.

    Once you're a pro-- and if you ride enough you will be, but to ride rollers that much you almost need your head done in-- you can ride in the middle of the basement or the spare bedroom or what have you.

    I have no trouble riding rollers but it is a workout, the drag of the tires, the friction of even the nicest rollers and the friction of the belt make an easy gear a bit of an effort and you have to pedal a certain speed or the bike will lack enough gyroscopic force to sit upright, so, unless you have paid for a set with a flywheel, there's no breaks.

    A very short gear will make you pedal your arse off to keep upright, a very tall gear will let you get away with a stomper's cadence. I prefer small ring, one gear down from the middle (of a 10 speed) when I'm going, but I start a couple clicks up the cog and finish the same way. Doesn't take much effort but it will still keep your pulse up and you can listen to the sound of the tires to see how round you are. When I get tired I can hear the whoosh, whoosh of some very square strokes. Oddly enough the first place I feel sore is the back of my knees from concentrating so fully on trying to pedal circles and bringing my leg back, up and around. Almost never feel any burn in my quads. But you will also wear yourself out a bit with trying to keep a light grip on the bar. Isolating your hands from your lower body is the key, but having a quiet upper body means you need to hold your core without using your hands as much.

    I usually ride for 30 minutes or so, and I put a video on so I have something to watch besides the clock. Look ahead-- if you're not watching anything look about 2 metres ahead of your front wheel and focus on relaxed, round strokes.

    My only warnings are these:
    I have ridden off the rollers countless times, sometimes ending up in a heap, sometimes doing alright. I get caught in my thoughts or the video or the music and ride straight off the side. The bike will come to a screeching halt. If you are set next to a wall you can sort of cheat that side and your arm should hit before you ride off. 20 years ago I put pieces of tape on the outside 7cm or so of my drums so that when I was riding near the edge I could feel the thump thump thump thump warning.

    You need a fan on, but you will still drip sweat. Don't do this over carpet or the Mrs. will likely lose her mind. Also, they make a sort of sweat catching thong that goes from your bars to your seat post to keep from corroding your stem, your headset and fixing hardware into a big lump. Either grease all that very well or get a sweat catcher.

    I also have a mat I put down on the carpet. Saves replacing it.

    NOTHING is as slippery as cleats and a cleaned (likely waxed) tiled floor. Take care. If you hop off to fill your water bottle up in the kitchen you might end up on your arse. Polished (well-trodden) concrete is nearly as slippery.

    I keep the bike in the study here with the computers so I'll take a few snaps:

    Here's the mat, I think it was cycle ops or something.

    [​IMG]


    Here's the sweat catcher. Same brand maybe?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You can see the evidence of the last ride-off. These tires are miserable anyway, I have a set of DT Swiss wheels with Dura-Ace hubs that I use for the road. I'm a big guy and these wispy little Vuelta rims don't seem like they'll last long. No pot holes on the rollers, though.

    [​IMG]


    This is the gear I ended up in to spin down.

    [​IMG]
  5. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    Even Eddy Merckx had to start holding the cupboard.

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/_BcHekNAfOo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  6. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Rollers are good for aerobic conditioning and perfecting your spin.

    Trainers are good for making you stronger, but they promote bad technique.

    Optimally, you need both.

    I'm headed over to my riding buddy's place noon-ish. Hopefully the fog'll be burned off by then. After losing Fri to headache and puking all day, I'm not sure how the legs are going to feel.

    Belgian cross champs are on now. You haven't missed too much if you go to cyclingfans.com and finish out the race.

    M
  7. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Now THAT was a race! Went from the gun. :nod

    I won't tell y'all who won in case someone's downloaded the Belgian champs and is gonna watch it later. (www.cyclingtorrents.nl)

    M
  8. Omi

    Omi 0o0o0o

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    Durango, Co
    Damn, it's 7 degrees and snowing here today. I'm trying to motivate myself to get on the bike or xc skis for an hour or two, but it's just so cold!
  9. zouch

    zouch part-time wanderer

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    berkeley, CA USA
    that's why i use Kreitlers with a headwind resistance fan; resistance is variable by adjusting the size of the fans air input.
    [​IMG]
    (i wouldn't use a plain old trainer; aside from the reason you listed, i find them terminally boring.)
  10. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    Altamonte Springs, Florida
    I know. :cry Next weekend I'm getting a test ride at Santos on a Niner RDO to see if it's significantly better than my Superfly 100. If it is, I'll just sell the Superfly's frame and put all the remaining parts on the RDO frame. :1drink
  11. Weirdo

    Weirdo Welcome to you're "DOOM"

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  12. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    40ish miles on the road. Had to really twist my buddy's arm to get him out the door. Despite the weather guessers saying 70 and sunny it was high 50s and foggy/drizzly.

    Saw a few people out, bit not many!

    Who else got in a ride today?

    M
  13. Weirdo

    Weirdo Welcome to you're "DOOM"

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    I'm debating it. I got 60k in yesterday in the cold. Today is 3c and drizzling with a side order of shit. It'll be another solo if it happens.

    I may need some encouragement.
  14. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

    Joined:
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    [​IMG]
    Last Wed (me in the background)

    Today
    [​IMG]

    M
  15. TheNedster

    TheNedster Lurkapotamus

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    Not today, but got in 40 road miles yesterday. Sunny and dry, but never got out of the 40s (stoopit north wind). Did a 20-some-odd MTB ride Thurs. night and damn near froze.:vardy Time to invest in some decent booties.
  16. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

    Joined:
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    ...or insulated shoes. :augie

    Personally, I can't see spending the $ on winter boots/shoes when booties allow you to ride with the same shoes year round, but that's me.

    I have some PI Barrier Lite booties (new, unworn) that replace some Pro Tarmac booties that were warmer than they look. Water and wind-proof too! I can wear those down into the high 30s.

    Gore insulated Gore Tex booties. For when its really cold: 40s and below. $$ but worth it. When your feet absolutely need to stay warm and dry, these are a doG-send. :nod

    Everything I have from Gore I like lots except their chamois-es. The fabric and cut of their shorts are great, but the chamois lets em down. I have a pair of cycling jackets (LS and half sleeve), the booties, a pair of knickers, and coming soon, a Phantom SO jacket. (keep an eye on chainlove)

    Belgian booties. ie: heavy socks with a cutout for your cleats. Work well into the upper 40s. Combine em with some toe booties and its not too bad to the upper-30s. (I'll do this for the nite cross rides we're doing 'cause I've got on mtn shoes and don't want to tear up my 'regular' booties.)

    Add Gore Tex socks to the toe booties and Belgian booties and you're OK to the 30s.

    If you're mtn biking in the winter gore tex socks are a doG-send. Remind me to tell y'all about the frozen over mud puddle one of these days. :nod

    M
  17. TheNedster

    TheNedster Lurkapotamus

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    Agreed on the the booties vs. dedicated winter shoes. I can get two pair of booties (one for mtn. one for road) for about half the cost of one pair of winter shoes. Besides, here in sunny CA, I only need the bloody things for about three months out of the year. :deal
  18. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    Location:
    SOP - south of Phoenix, hotter n hell
    It was 23F on the way to the first century of the year and never got over 50. I started at 8:30 and was back at the car at 2:35.

    I have to share this. I was riding with another rider and we were cruising along at 17-18 when a group went by at 24 or so. That's too fast for me at 100 miles but I jumped on with another group who was moving around 20. One of the guys in the group only had one leg and apparently, only one good hand. He had no trouble keeping up although as you can imagine, his peddling was a little jerky.

    We stopped for lunch at the 70 mile point and the group started off again. This starts with a slight but steady 6 mile grade. I was pretty wel toast as were a few others. I caught several of them over the next 20 miles but about 6 miles from the end, I rode by the one-legged rider who was sitting off the side of the road trying to change a flat. I yelled to ask it he needed help and he said he didn't but I turned the cranks twice....and turned around.

    I didn't do much more than offer help. He was struggling but I was worried about insulting him. He managed ok with on good hand but I helped a bit by using my pump to top off his pressure. Next time you have a front flat, try to stand on one leg and balance everything while putting the wheel back on the bike. That cost me 10 minutes but it was worth it.

    So glad to soak in the tub when I got home....and warm up!
  19. Weirdo

    Weirdo Welcome to you're "DOOM"

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    Drizze turned to freezing rain so I chickened out.

    Thanks for the motivation. I'll get my miles in this month, I'm quite a bit ahead of my schedule so I don't need to risk a fall to keep on track.

    I have this pinned up to keep me moving on the cold wet days:




    ON RULE #9: LOVE THE WORK

    by frank / Oct 31 2011 / 332 posts
    Fitness. The rhythm, the feeling of precision in our movement, the sensations of The Ride. The temptation of knowing we might in some way control our suffering even as we push harder in spite of the searing pain in our legs and lungs. The notion that through suffering, we might learn something rudimentary about ourselves – that we might find a kind of salvation.

    Cycling, like Art, is based on the elementary notion that through focussed study, we might better understand ourselves. But to describe Cycling as a an Art does it an injustice. An artist, they say, suffers because they must. A Cyclist, I suggest, suffers because we choose to.

    This element of choice, what psychologists refer to as the locus of control, is part of what allows us to feel pleasure through suffering. Through this choice unfolds an avenue of personal discovery by which we uncover the very nature of ourselves. Like Michelangelo wielding his hammer to chip away fragments of stone that obscure a great sculpture, we turn our pedals to chip away at our form, eventually revealing our true selves as a manifestation of hard work, determination, and dedication to our craft.

    Having chosen this path, we quickly find that riding a bicycle on warm, dry roads through sunny boulevards is the realm of the recreational cyclist. As winter approaches, the days get shorter and the weather worse. Form tempts us to greater things, but leaves us quickly despite our best intentions. Its taste lingers long upon the tongue and urges us to gain more. Even as life gets in the way, we cannot afford many days away from our craft before we find ourselves struggling to reclaim lost fitness.

    To find form in the first place, and to maintain it in the second, is a simple matter of riding your bicycle a lot. This simple task asks of us, however, a year-round commitment to throwing our leg over a toptube in heat, cold, wind, rain, or sleet, lest we spend months fighting to reclaim last year’s lost condition.

    But with riding in bad weather is revealed a hidden secret. It is in the rain and the cold, when all the seductive elements of riding a bicycle have vanished, that we are truly able to ensconce ourselves in the elemental qualities of riding a bicycle. Good weather and beautiful scenery, after all, are distractions from the work. Without them, we have only those elements that we ourselves bring to The Ride: the rhythm, harmony between rider and machine, our suffering, and our thoughts. As the rain pours down and all but the most devoted stay indoors, we pull on extra clothing and submit into the deluge.

    We are the Few, we are the Committed. We are those who understand that riding in bad weather means you’re a badass, period
  20. Omi

    Omi 0o0o0o

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    Well, it stopped snowing so I managed to get out for about an hour. The snow made it much easier to ride than on yesterdays ice covered streets.