Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    I keep trying to tell people the exact same thing. Too bad no one listens to me. :cry

    In 300mi if you haven't eaten a stick, dropped it on the wrong side, or done anything else wonky, the parts you have should be darn near new. :nod Ride it. Clean it/lube it. Repeat. Things last longer and work better that way.

    M
  2. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    Someone once said that 60% of every brevet is 90% mental. I suppose that means that with the proper tools, you can convince yourself that you can ride 750-miles in less than 90 hours.

    Looking at the numbers always helps me over this mental hump. The picture below is a spreadsheet that someone set up for another event and I modified for this one. There are only three places to modify data, all indicated in blue: your average rolling speed, the minutes off the bike between controls and the time that you stay in the control itself.

    The controls are points where you need to be at a certain time. If you're late, you're done. If you're early, you can rest until the controls "opens". Getting there early is a problem I usually don't have. :evil Both your min and max speeds are determined by the overall length. For a 1200-km, the min is 8.3 miles per hour and the max is 16.2 mph.

    Yes, 8.3 mph sounds easy but keep in mind to ride that speed and finish, you'd need to ride 8.3 mph for 90 hours in a row, no sleep, no food....nada.

    So, here's a good idea of what I anticipate - steady and predictable:

    [​IMG]

    Recumbents - at least my recumbent with my fat a$$ on-board is slow on the hills and they don't call it the Texas Hill Country 'cause it's flat. We once did a 600 mile tour there... over a week. That was 35 years ago.

    Most of us start out strong and taper off over the next nearly four days. I shoot for a 16-17 overall average and then take what the road, the conditions and my body allows. Under the right conditions, I can kick it to 23 mph easily on the flats - even late on the third day. That's not typical though.

    Once I'm on the ride, I never worry myself with the times on the controls. At a 15 mph overall, every two hours on the bike gives me an hour off at some point.

    Contingency plan? Yep, if the hills are too much and I'm too slow, sleep will be sacrificed. Not having a support car works to your advantage. The first group of six riders at last year's Last Chance made it to the first control together. Of that six, four quit the ride there. They all had their own support and the temptation of a warm car on a wet cold day was impossible for them to ignore. I can hear them now, "Forget this. I'm done." These were some very, very experienced and fast riders.

    I didn't have that choice - so I kept riding. I got around 8 hours sleep over 84.5 hours. Compare that to the numbers above - 84 hours total of which 19 hours in the controls. That allows for about 15 hours of sleep. That'd be super - but I doubt it'll work out that way. Either way, I hope I'm mentally tough enough to gut it out. All I'm doing is riding to the next control. Once I'm there, I eat a bit and set off for the next control.

    17 days until the Texas Stampede 1200! :freaky
  3. RxZ

    RxZ Legal Drug Dealer

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    To be fair M, it was new tires I was looking at, nothing too shiny :evil .

    I had ridden a bike with wider tires on it and really liked it, but that bike is at least 4 times better than mine (and 5x the price :eek1 ). There are so many things that could have made that bike feel better to me that it just isn't worth going down that road.

    My bike gets me from start to finish every time, what more could I want :dunno

    The bike will last much more than 300 miles, but honestly I am surprised the tires have. Lots small trees were cut at ground level to make the local trails, and now those pointy bits stick straight up. i.e. tire daggers. The rear is starting to loose air between rides, but it will hold the air I put in prior to a ride, I just have to refill it before the next ride.
  4. El Guero

    El Guero V4 Whore

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    Those brevets sound completely nuts. I imagine the sense of accomplishment when done is fantastic, but I don't think I have the will to do something like that. The bikes are cool though!
  5. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    tires are a different story. Tires are like tools. Hammers work real well for nails, but not so good for screws. Tire treads are the same way. :nod Some are good for hardpack. Some are good for soft stuff.

    I've tended to pick tires that'll do a little bit of everything. Starting with the original Ground Control thru my current version of the Z-max.

    ...but you have to experiment to see what works for you. :nod Riding styles are like belly buttons: everyone's is slightly different.

    Components? 'Nother story. People get a case of upgrade-itis (:wave) hoping that the new bit will 'fix' their riding. It typically doesn't. :nah I have bikes that weigh between 15# and 22#. I go the same speed on all of em. (in fact, I need to go do some intervals here pretty soon. :nod)

    M
  6. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Try telling skinny-tire riders that wider tires are nearly as fast and way more comfortable. I switched from a measured 27mm tire to a measured 37mm tire and lost nothing. However, the 37s are so much more comfortable. I've been asked why I'm riding such a wide tire and try to explain it to them. But, people look at me like I'm an idiot. They don't realize I used to ride a TT bike for an everyday bike. I actually do know what skinny tires are about. As always, the engine is the biggest factor; not the tires. :deal
  7. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    The problem comes when you're the one on the big tires and all the rest of the guys you're with are riding the small tires. :nod Especially when you're trying to keep up with significantly faster riders than you are. Those few extra watts are a doGsend at speed.

    For example: 2 weeks ago, I was on the Wed ride on my 32/32 training wheels. The end of Antioch Rd couldn't come fast enough 'cause I was darn near redlined. Last week, I rode my lighter, more aero wheels and I had a little left at the end of the road. HR was 5-10 beats lower and the legs weren't screaming at me nearly as much.

    Still got dropped on the hill, but I could ride to the first steep section with the group.

    For JRA, I've found that I'm darn near as fast on my 32c Tufos as I am the 23c Contis. ...and the Tufos insulate me more from the vibrations of the road.

    Gotta go ride... Back later

    M
  8. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Since switching to gravel, I no longer have that problem. :lol3
  9. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Makes one of us. My riding buddy is like a pit bull with a bone even off-road.

    M
  10. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    If you were riding in a mostly flat area like Florida, could the same rider maintain a higher speed than he could on a regular road bike?
  11. YakSpout

    YakSpout Obstacle Allusion

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    Depends on the size/shape of the aerobelly.
  12. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    Yes.

    In general, recumbents are more aero that DF's but some recumbents are more aero that other recumbents.

    All things being equal, a recumbent will always be faster than a diamond-frame. "All things being equal" means the riders are evenly matched, the tires/wheels are the same, etc so all the variable are eliminated except for the bike design itself.
  13. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    And the optional recumbent beard and sandals. :lol3
  14. YakSpout

    YakSpout Obstacle Allusion

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    I don't get that. The beard is drag. Should be shaved clean.

    Sandals on the other hand are totally aero.

    :rofl
  15. mud

    mud I just wander.....

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    Wanna know how many hammers I own???? :wink:
  16. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    The guy who re-introduced me to bicycling has since traded in his bicycle for a recumbent. He says he can no longer tolerate the physical discomfort of riding a bicycle for hours. It's ironic because he used to speak very disparagingly about recumbents and the people who rode them, but now denies ever having said those things. :rofl

    I don't know why they aren't more popular in Florida. I've been dying to test ride one of those two wheeled recumbents someone posted a video of. Unfortunately all they sell around here are the three wheeled type, which probably aren't as fast or as much fun. :dunno
  17. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    When a hammer is the only tool you own, all the world's a nail.
  18. mud

    mud I just wander.....

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    The funny part is, I can't remember the last time I used a hammer to hit a nail. Just like tires, they have MANY other uses.
  19. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    I suspect that if you dig deeply enough on ADV, you mgiht find a negative comment by me regarding recumbents. I can't deny it - it's out there on the record.

    Some of the fastest recumbent riders in the US are based in FL. Kent Polk is a phenomenal rider and a heck of a nice guy. Link

    He’s one of those unsung athletes that you don’t hear much about, but Kent Polk’s success within the ultracycling world is what many dream of. Seemingly more comfortable out of the limelight, Polk routinely teams with other racers to help maximize the result for both. Nevertheless, he’s still competing solo and during the four Bike Sebring 24 RAAM Qualifiers he’s raced (2010 – 2013), Kent has averaged 475 miles per race with a high mileage mark of 505 miles last year. Despite putting up some very large numbers, Kent has never won the event, that is until this year. Here’s Kent Polk’s winning 2013 Bike Sebring 24 race report.

    Kent's in his late 50's/early 60's I believe.

    John and Jacquie Schlitter also come to mind - they've both ridden over 400 miles in a single day on many occasions. Here's a story from last year's Sebring event. Linky

    Team Bacchetta’s Jacquie Hafner competed in the 2011 12hr Sebring race and set a new overall women’s 12 hr record with a 254.7 mile race. She went on to have great results throughout the 2011 season at the 12hr distance, but managed to avoid racing a 24hr. Enter the 2012 season. Jacquie raced the Sebring 24hr Drafting event to an overall women’s record of 516.4 miles. She’s also racing on a 4-person Race Across America (RAAM) team this June. Here is Jacquie’s Sebring 24hr record ride story:

    The Schlitter's run Vite Cycles in Sarasota - new shop, website. Trust me, they know fast recumbents.
  20. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    I used to own (and subsequently work) on old Land Rovers. It's always been said that with old Landies, it always comes down to a hammer and an adjustable wrench. BTDT.