Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Mr Head

    Mr Head PowerPoint ADV

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    I programmed my HP- something to calculate spoke length, using an algorithm from Brandt. This was of course well before internet toys or excel was available in our pockets.
    I used it to calculate spoke lengths for a couple of sets of wheels I built. One set of training sew-ups, a radial spoked front and my set of C-record hubbed MA40's. Every spoke was the perfect length. That was cool. But, I had to create my own database of values to work from. Getting the rim measurement right is a trick. I did it by using two spokes and a caliper.
    I was never fast, so building as a profession would be dumb. Though I would not get fat.:lol3
    The usual method of building wheels back then was to go to the pro-shop, (real bicycle shop run by an old European ex-racer) who would hand you the hubs you desired, rims spokes and nipples, then berate you for screwing it up a few days later when you came back with the rear wheel laced backwards. :poser
    But, then patiently demonstrate how to re-lace it correctly and send you on your way.
    Then every time you walked in to buy some tubes, tires or just hang out, he'd ask if you broke those wheels yet.:wink:

    Good times.
    And yes, I've laced a wheel up completely backwards and mounted the tire and as I put into the frame noticed my error. It was 10:30-ish PM. There were a few raw words expended at somewhat elevated levels. The neighbors may have noticed. By, 1AM I had it corrected. :cry
    That has been long enough ago to not remember much more than that and which wheel that was, I think first rims on those old 36H Campy hubs, or maybe it was the second. Yeah, probably the second. Back when I could hear I could tune my spoke by ear. I even managed that with old airhead wheels from the 60's and 70's.
    I still prefer the look of those old spoke rims from the 1974 R90S to most cast wheels.

  2. Ridge

    Ridge Sinister Kid

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    Very cool. That's one skill I have yet to attempt... soon though!
  3. Mr Head

    Mr Head PowerPoint ADV

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    Buy This Book First

  4. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Buy the book. Read the book. Screw things up. Fix em. Get better. Repeat till you're decent at it. Then stop riding for 6 years and forget all you know so you have to re-learn it.

    S'how I did it anyway.

    I build most of my own wheels. I'll accumulate hubs and then find rims for em. ...or vice versa... I still have a stack 12" deep of box-section tubular rims from my days of racing track. :augie

    M

    Edited to add: :205 d by Mr Head. Oh well.
  5. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    I'm not sayin nuthin. Nope. Not a darn thing.

    BTDT more'n I can count.

    M
  6. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Likely Lost.

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    So because I would forget my ass if it wasn't attached I manged to ride 28 miles this morning.

    ......before I got to work so I could explain why I was three and a half hours late because I would forget my ass if it wasn't attached.

    I only live 6 miles from my door to the gate, I made that trip 4 1/2 times:huh Not my morning.
  7. Ridge

    Ridge Sinister Kid

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    Much grass, mee ameegos!
  8. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Likely Lost.

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    This is the story of my life here. :lol3
  9. Mr Head

    Mr Head PowerPoint ADV

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    Yeah that read part is important. I did it while I was in engineering school. meant I studied the book more than casually read it as a how-to.

    There were a lot of pencil scribbles in my world then.

    I need to re-true that rear wheel of mine again. Those Roval wheels suck for staying in tune under my wide load. I broke one spoke a while ago and the replacement spoke is smaller in cross section. Wrong color too.
    Need to figure out how to fix that.
    My truing stand and offset tool are in some storage unit. I know nothing about how to find them. So, I'll have to wait for my wife to show me, and in the mean time use the bike.
  10. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    fixt

    M
  11. zippy

    zippy Hinter dem Feld

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    amen on the 32/32. Although I bought mine with chris king hubs and had to learn to set the preload after the hubs loosened a bit. While I was intimidated by the thought the actual act was pretty damn easy.
  12. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    90% of my riding is on 32/32 wheels. I have one set of 28/32 wheels I ride lots too. My opinon for training is 'more spokes is more better.' Durability, ease of repair, and durability all count more than aero or even weight **for training.** Yes, I typed durability twice on purpose. I have wheelsets older than some of the people I ride with!

    M
  13. ericm

    ericm Been here awhile

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    You can make some measuring tools from two old (but straight) spokes. I cut mine so they are 250mm long to make the math easier.
    Thread on nipples until the end of the spoke is flush with the bottom of the slot. Loktite 'em on.
  14. soyanarchisto

    soyanarchisto Long timer

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    I'm trying to figure out what I did wrong.

    Purchased a new road bike (cannondale supersix evo red) about a week ago. Aside from a 40-mile ride on Sunday, I've only been using it for my daily commute (10 miles round trip). So, right about 100 miles or so.

    Tuesday, I'm riding home and in the homestretch is a small incline. I am riding in my highest gear (i.e. big chain ring and smallest cog on my cassette), and push it over into the third cog on the rear cassette for the "hill." Still in my big chain ring. I pedal another block or so before I notice a guy up ahead that I want to try and catch, so I stand up on the pedals to sprint. As soon as I put some pressure on the pedals, "pop" the chain comes off the big chain ring to the inside (towards the frame) and over the handlebars I go.

    What did I do wrong?

    Again, its a brand new bike. I did NOT switch gears while standing on the pedals (made that mistake before). I've been riding for over 30 years (never competitively) and this has never happened before. The bike has some rash on the brake levers and the seat but is otherwise fine (I, on the other hand, have a broken collarbone and some road rash). Took it back to the shop to have it looked at and they cant find anything wrong.

    Thoughts? As you can imagine, I would like to avoid this happening again.
  15. rbrsddn

    rbrsddn 3banger

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    I'm not sure If your chain ended up on the BB shell, but if it did, take a look at this...I haven't crashed, but have thrown the chain... http://www.rei.com/product/670913/t...ferralID=8b3b59c8-f57a-11e2-a969-001b2166c2c0

    Good luck, and keep the rubber side down!
  16. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    How heavy are you?

    My first guess is you torqued the frame/BB hard enough to cause a mis-shift in the front. Ask Mr Head about the old Vitus/Alan frames... They were notorious for that.

    After that: slightly loose BB or bearings migrating around in the shell.

    Otherwise? :dunno

    HTH

    M
  17. soyanarchisto

    soyanarchisto Long timer

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    6'3" and about 195 or so.

    Guy at the shop tried to replicate it but couldnt. Cable stretch maybe?
  18. pierce

    pierce Aven'Tourer

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    Geez, you knew Spence of Cupertino Cyclery, too? I was a customer of his after he'd "retired" and then reopened a shop by the same name in Pacific Grove, out by Asilomar in the fog zone. :gerg

    I probably should have kept my last pair of tubular rims he'd tied and soldered for me. vintage NR hubs and all. those rims were light, strong, and fast.
  19. ericm

    ericm Been here awhile

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    soyanarchisto- bummer about the collarbone.

    Is this an Sram bike? Could you have hit the shift paddle by accident as you stood? Sram takes very little lever travel to shift from the big ring to the small ring and the strong derailleur spring makes it happen fast when you trip it. I have had it shift all by itself but only in an extremely bumpy race (Copperoppolis for you NCNCA denizens). Not in normal riding.

    If the derailleur was out of adjustment from cable stretch you'd hear the chain rubbing on it. The rub would be worst in the smallest cog.


    My Vitus 979 would rub the chain on the derailleur but did not ghost shift even though it's a large frame.
  20. zouch

    zouch part-time wanderer

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    yep; that's me now, too,...

    i've been through radially-spoked 24º Rolfs (harsh), and all the way down to 28º GEL280s (brilliantly smooth with Contis) and been able to make them all last fine. but the way i descend on my favorite (read: crappy) roads i just feel more at ease with something like my nice set of (lightly spoked) 3x 32º Open Pros these days.
    even the stuff i beat on on my CX/Fire Road bike is 32º, though they're on a 135mm OLD rear axle and are either an asymmetric rear rim, or 2x on the non-drive side. (keep in mind that like so many of us, i'm not the featherweight that i once was, and i was 'GS'sized to start with...)


    divide the (low) mileage i get in these days over all the bikes and multiple wheelsets that i do it on, factor in the quality of the the parts and builds, and it seems like the dang stuff lasts so long when done right to start with i never remember what i've learned about building wheels. considering that i don't do any building often enough to stay in good enough practice, these days, were i to need wheels, i'd get them from one of the skilled and well-practiced pro wheelbuilders around here.


    cheers!