Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Andrew

    Andrew Optimus Primer Super Moderator

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    :nod and :nod

    I'm using VP "thin gripsters" on both of my Rivendells, and am very happy. Even on long rides, 50-70 miles in a day, they're comfortable and I like being able to move my feet around - gives my leg muscles a break. For shoes, I found some excellent shot-putt shoes with dead-flat soles, no waffle tread just a slab of rubber. They're also fairly thin, but rubber is stout enough that I don't feel the pedal pins/spikes through the shoes (only on my legs when I'm walking the bike and bang into them).

    http://oceanaircycles.com/2013/04/22/vp-vice-and-001-pedal-comparison/

    http://www.rivbike.com/product-p/pe4.htm
  2. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Y'all can pat me on the back now. I got over my crisis of motivation aka the f*ckits and actually *gasp* rode the trainer just now. Managed to get in two sets of Tabata intervals in 53min.

    My Cateye Psychostimulator said I was hovering somewhere in the 400w range consistently across all 10min of intervals.

    That 20sec on seems to last for-effing-EVER! while the 10sec recovery flies. WhyTF is that?! :confused

    I've now matched last year. I rode the mother-loving thing twice last year and I'm up to twice already this year. :bluduh

    M
  3. Emperor Norton

    Emperor Norton Kilroy was here

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    I went to my LBS today to test ride the Sirrus and Secteur. I was not impressed with the feel/power of the brake levers on either (ok, Brembo spoiled me). I found the straight barred Sirrus the least comfortable of the two and didn't care for the thumb stretch to use the shifter. For me the Secteur was more comfortable and less twitchy (or after 20 years of not being on a bicycle I was remembering how to ride a pedal powered vehicle again). After tweaking the position of the seat and bars I thought I had my bike. Then the salesman points out the Allez Elite:becca
  4. Chisenhallw

    Chisenhallw Avowed Pussbag

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    I've narrowed it down to 'earth'. Or 'Baltimore'.
    The Allez is a very nice bike.
  5. inyang

    inyang 5secs away

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    What model of the Sectuer were you looking at?

    This?
  6. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

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    X2, nice BMX pedals with sharp pins work just fine. The sharper the pins, the less dangerous. It is like a knife, a dull knife is more dangerous, more likely to slip and hurt yourself.
    My riding consists of around town rides of 20-40 miles. I recently did Pittsburgh to DC, 370 miles total, on flat pedals.
    You can get a decent pull up on the pedals if you point your toes down a bit.

    I still use clipless on the MTB, they are useful for that log you have to bunny hop mid corner or the short steep climb where you need 110% power.

    Do not use toe clips, they are dangerous and do not offer any real advantage over good flat pedals. To put your foot down in an emergency you have to pull your foot back and then put it out to catch yourself. At least with clipless the motion is all to the side to put your foot down quickly.

    Be prepared to drop a little coin on good flat pedals, they can be comparable to clipless. Cheap Vp flats cost as much as cheap Vp clipless and it goes up from there.
  7. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

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    Wow, I am a flat bar fan, but damn, that is tempting. :clap

    FYI: the Allez is going to be more racy and less versatile. That Sectuer will do almost anything you want to do. The Allez will not accept larger tires for light off-road riding.
  8. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    <iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/tP3uAy1YQpQ?feature=player_embedded" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  9. Aurelius

    Aurelius Long timer

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    One advantage I've come to appreciate after switching from clipless to flats on my mountain bike is that on extremely steep and tricky climbs, flats make it much easier to get going again if you stall out and have to resume pedaling from a dead stop. When you're in the lowest gear, there often isn't enough time to clip the remaining foot back in after the other foot completes half a pedal stroke.

    On anything less challenging than expert level trails, I still prefer clipless pedals because of the advantages they confer. It just so happens that all my training at the moment involves mastering the most difficult and dangerous trails, and for that I don't want to be clipped in.
  10. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    Opinions may vary... For the most technical trails I much prefer being attached to my bike. Makes moving the back wheel around easier among other things.

    Once you get good with the clipless you can get in (and out of) em pretty darn quickly. Its just not something you end up thinking about 'cause the legs/feet just kind of do it automatically.

    Speaking of attached to the bike: just got in from a '5 Gravel Roads' ride. AKA I went backwards on the last stretch first and then re-rode the same stretch the 'right' way at the end of the ride. Roads were smooth enough that I could've ridden the road bike down em. :ricky

    M
  11. Mr Head

    Mr Head PowerPoint ADV

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    One way to train yourself to clipless is to stop at every stop sign, pull a foot out and put it on the ground. After a few hundred of those you'll not even think about it. The guys who used to tip over at the start lines back when I was racing were the ones who didn't stop at stop signs.
    Of course we were using tow straps. :lol3
  12. fullmonte

    fullmonte Reformed Kneedragger

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    I hope I wasn't the only one riding on Turkey Day. Got out for 9.6 miles of singletrack and blasted some previous lap times out of the water. Maybe it was the new Shimano Gore Tex winter shoes that did it. No froze toes today.:clap Of course, I almost fell down while unclipping a couple of times due to installing some unfamiliar cleats just before leaving the house.:eek1 Aurelius would've been proud.:D
  13. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    The nice thing with that one, other than discs, is the long-cage RD and it's super-low low gear.

    Not to mention, the geometry may be way too twitchy for a returning rider. Be sure to ride the Allez and Secteur back-to-back, JoeDuck.
  14. pierce

    pierce Aven'Tourer

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    FWIW, I've been using a pair of 'walking shoes' that have a substantial steel shank in the sole much like a good hiking boot. my Wellgo pin pedals grab onto these like glue, and the shank keeps me from feeling ANY pedal under me. the pedals have a dish that just about matches the curve of the ball of the sole of the shoes.
  15. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

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    That is what I ment by racy, twitchy might be a better way to put it. The Allez might feel like more fun on a 10 minute test ride but in my opinion, unless you actually plan on racing, the Secteur is the better choice. That bike will do it all.
  16. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    +1

    I loved my Roubaix. If it'd had a shorter head tube, I'd probably still have it.

    M
  17. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Figured you meant riding position.

    Agree with your last thought, as well.

    Has your shop gotten in an AWOL, yet?
  18. mud

    mud I just wander.....

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    I am kind of excited to see this one....
  19. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Yeah, their Trans-Con videos are intriguing. I'd like to get a new bike for '14 and really wanted a Fargo. But, this thing came along. Then, I keep thinking of just getting a Lynskey frameset and disc wheels and swap my Tricross components over. But, there's the Raleigh Tamland, too. Argh!
  20. mud

    mud I just wander.....

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    I LOVE my Fargo. It fits what I use it for perfectly. I tend to be the pack mule when my family goes for a ride and I can pretty much ride it anywhere and it does it really well. I like the new gravel bikes but I need (for now) full rack braze-ons, especially for lowriders.