Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Mr Head

    Mr Head Adventure Hippie

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    Oddometer:
    10,422
    Location:
    San Clemente, CA
    Rode over and picked up the car. Stopped to help a guy who flatted and had no pump. either my pump doesn't work or his tube was pinched. Personally I'd have just ridden it. because I have done that before. Car feels new.
    $1,300 later I'm happy and cool inside it. Now, I need to clean it up.
    That little ride put me over 100 for the week.
    And from the looks of the painting the trim is going to be white. Which is what we all wanted.
    [​IMG]
    Notice both gates are white. They started painting my doors white as well. We shall see how that all goes.
    Green Stainz, Geek and PMC like this.
  2. filmfan

    filmfan Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,834
    Location:
    Live Free or Die
    Conti Competition sew up, after its initial retirement with just a couple of spots showing, it became my spare and got put back on at least three times while I was running cheaper tires. Never punctured it.

    IMG_0676.jpg
  3. chippertheripper

    chippertheripper motorcycle junkie

    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    6,288
    Location:
    s.e. mass
    one lap or 2?
  4. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,760
    Location:
    Lexington, Virginia
    I love it! Staying fit is a lifetime habit and WAY too many people think they can park their asses on the couch for 40 years and then leap up and get right back into things they did in their 20's. It can be done but it's rare because it takes tremendous dedication to overcome that inertia and I suspect most will have health issues related to a sedentary life style for all that time. I have a friend who is 74 this year (+14 than me) and I cannot keep up with him on a bike. He also takes care of his farm and is a practicing blacksmith. I also know people who are much younger than I am and can't make it up a single flight of stairs without being totally winded and blown for the day. Use it or lose it, they say.
    Green Stainz, fullmonte and chasbo like this.
  5. Mr Head

    Mr Head Adventure Hippie

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    Oddometer:
    10,422
    Location:
    San Clemente, CA
    Back in the day a good friend and I rode to Boulder one morning and entered a crit. You could do that then.
    His wife drove up with a picnic blanket and a cooler of beer and sandwiches and set up in an adjacent park.
    At the start like an official who didn't know me tried to roll my clincher he swore was a sewup. It of course wasn't. He tore the calluses off his palms.
    Our plan was to do a few laps then sit up and get pulled. Then drink beer.
    Of course we begin moving up the field. I decided after a few laps that I could use a beer and just pulled off at the pit, told them I was done and went to get a cold beer.
    Rich thought I was still moving up the field. A mistake that dawned on him when his wife and I were cheering him on the next lap while hoisting beers.
    Beer and bike racing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. TheYeti

    TheYeti Hard to be Humble

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,358
    Location:
    North Carolina, a little left of center

    Wow it's amazing what a couple coats of paint makes
    manfromthestix and Mr Head like this.
  7. UngaWunga

    UngaWunga Mosquito bait

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    10,304
    Location:
    NH
    Dunno. Should I get my monies worth and go for 2? :lol3
  8. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Oddometer:
    32,590
    Location:
    NoVA for now...
    Had a strange interaction tonite after the ride. Wandered past one of the guys on the ride saying he wants a Top Fuel 17.5

    I have a Top Fuel 9.9 I'll sell you for $3k

    Nope. I'm going to buy it from a shop.

    I was so stunned that I blurted out Why would you want to do that?!

    Because it's my $$

    You're going to pay another $1500 (or more) for the same bike? When my bike is 7 rides old?

    Yup.

    :norton

    Called my co-worker/boss and explained the interaction while driving home. He clued me in that 'it's politics' and the guy in question is dealing with a shop in Charlottesville (45min or more south!) because the last shop in town pissed him off over a warranty, and blah blah blah the shop in Charlottesville hates my co-worker/boss. The guy I was talking to is not likely to pay retail, but my bike is still going to be less expensive (I know 'cause I worked for a Trek dealer!) and likely to have the AL rear end vs the carbon rear triangle on mine.

    The Top Fuel 9.8 closest to what I have is $5200-$5700 and that doesn't include the nearly $1000 (retail) carbon rear end on mine. Hell! The 9.9 frame alone retails for $3k!

    There are some times I just don't get people.

    M
    Green Stainz and Mr Head like this.
  9. Mr Head

    Mr Head Adventure Hippie

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    Oddometer:
    10,422
    Location:
    San Clemente, CA
    I think that sometimes. No many times people are stupid.


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  10. k7

    k7 Long pockets, short arms

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Oddometer:
    23,563
    Location:
    SOP - south of Phoenix, hotter n hell
    New parts arrived today, road-rash is slowly healing. Back on the bike soon.
    Mr Head, fullmonte, Ridge and 2 others like this.
  11. Askel

    Askel Perma-n00b

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    Jun 3, 2005
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    11,000
    Location:
    Da UP, eh.
    Depends on how good the post ride party is.
    fullmonte likes this.
  12. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,303
    Location:
    Nelson, New Zealand
    Been meaning to report back some highly-elevated levels of frustration with the tubeless setup on my Trek X-Caliber 8.

    After the advice here earlier in the year, I had another epic fail attempting to mount one of the tyres tubeless. After an hour or so of trying everything suggested and more, and blowing about 90 mL of Stan's all over me, my helper, the garage carpet, the cupboard doors, and every-fricken'-where, I gave up. There was not a shit-show in hell that tyre was going to get on to the rim such that it would seal. It wasn't even close.

    A couple of days later I had a very good, methodical look at it. Turns out there were a few issues:
    1. The tubeless valve wasn't sealing in the valve hole in the rim. The rim has a presta-sized hole on the outside, but the inner layer of the double-wall rim had a wider hole. The valve stem didn't have the necessary schrader-sized conical rubber seal piece to block off a wider hole. The tubeless kit didn't come with those, it was difficult to tell when ordering, and from the outside it looks like a narrow presta hole which is why I didn't chase it up. To solve that, I had to order a separate set of valves that come with the conical seals.
    2. The presta to schrader adapter I was using on the valve stem to use the air compressor was stopping the chuck on the air compressor from sealing. Backing it off about one turn still let the adapter seal against the valve stem, but crucially let the air compressor seal to actually blow a decent amount of air into the valve.
    3. Air, and sealant, was being blown out through all the external spoke nipples. WTF?? On inspection, the OEM rim tape had come unstuck. Air was getting under the rim tape, so getting into the hollow between the two layers of the rim, and thence out around the spoke nipples. To solve this, I removed the OEM tape and used the tubeless rim bands from the tubeless kit.
    I rode it with a tube for a few months until I next needed to place an online order, and bought the valve kit with the schrader adapter cones. I also got some Orange Seal (Endurance). I fitted up the tubeless rim bands, the valve stems, lubed the tyre beads with a strong dish soap solution, fitted the presta to schrader adapter loosely, hit it with the compressor... pfffft pfffft ding! pfffft ding! ding!... et voila! Easy-peasy!!! Gah! It would come off the bead every time I (deliberately) let the air out, and would pop back on no problemo first burst from the compressor. Added the sealant, popped it on the bead, pumped it up to pressure, shook the sealant around... done. Repeat on the other wheel. It's oh-so-simple when it works.

    I've been a happy camper running tubeless on that bike for a couple of months now. But tonight, I've discovered the front tyre is flat/unbeaded, and it has the same problem with this type of tubeless rim band now. Feck. Air is simply pouring out around the valve stem. There's sealant underneath the rim band. It's leaking slow enough that the compressor can bead up the tyre no problem, but it only takes 15-30 seconds for the air to leak out and un-bead the tyre. Given the band is sitting hard up against the inner edge of the rim, slightly curled up the wall, I'm not sure how this can happen, but perhaps the tyre bead is sitting up off the floor of the rim and not holding the rim band down? Dunno. It's supposed to be the correct size for the rim width.

    At this stage I'm not sure what I'm going to do. If I remove the tyre and clean up the rim band, it'll probably seal again. But for how long? Will rim sealing tape work any better than the OEM stuff did? Trouble is, having ridden tubes and tubeless back-to-back, I know how much better tubeless is in terms of ride quality and grip. I don't want to go back to tubes, but equally I have to be able to rely on the tyre staying up.
    YakSpout likes this.
  13. TheYeti

    TheYeti Hard to be Humble

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,358
    Location:
    North Carolina, a little left of center
    Yay!!! heal up quick!
  14. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,760
    Location:
    Lexington, Virginia
    You have carpet in your garage?

    :lol3

    Man if I tried that around here it would just be a mold and mildew petri dish after a week given our normal humidity and precipitation.

    Seriously, sorry for all your troubles with the switch to tubeless. Yours and other similar stories have encouraged me to just stick with good old-fashioned tubes and tough tires (I'm a big fan of Conti GatorSkins for the horrid roads we have around here :thumb). They may be a bit heavier and lower performance, but I'll take their proven functionality, reliability, toughness, and ease of maintenance over the potential benefits of tubeless. All of my motorcycles (and cars, truck, trailers, etc.) are tubeless but they were purpose-built and work flawlessly. Thanks for posting about your travails and I hope someone can help with your issues.

    Speaking of horrid roads, the local VDOT crews chip-sealed my frigging road while I was out of town yesterday :bluduh. Now I have two miles of lovely loose crushed rock (sharp splintered rock frags) and fresh tar to navigate from the farm down to the main road. While I appreciate what VDOT is doing to maintain the roads, I detest chip seal. Apparently the maintenance folks have never attempted to ride a bicycle or motorcycle over their creation. :devildog
    bikemoto and Mr Head like this.
  15. cjbiker

    cjbiker Nobody's Robot

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,906
    Location:
    Southern Maine
    How's Trek's warranty? I'm shopping FS bikes pretty hard, and it's becoming apparent that a good warranty and buying from a shop that's not 3 hours away (or mail order) is better than saving a few bucks. Maybe not $1500, but still.
    manfromthestix likes this.
  16. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,760
    Location:
    Lexington, Virginia
    I'm with you. I recently bought a new bike from a local shop and paid ~$300 more than I could have gotten it off the Web but I really appreciate my local guys and want to do my part to keep them in business. I bought new pedals, shoes, tool bag, blinky lights, and some other bits from them too even though those things are significantly cheaper on-line. They are always there for me when I need them and I try to reciprocate; even though it may cost me a few more bucks I think it's a good deal in the long run.
    Green Stainz likes this.
  17. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Oddometer:
    32,590
    Location:
    NoVA for now...
    $300 is 'noise.' $1500+ isn't unless you make significant amounts of $$ and have it to blow.

    ...and I AM the LBS in the picture. Dood in question is driving out the way to go somewhere else due to 'politics' :baldy

    It's exceedingly rare for Trek frames to spontaneously break. Crash and break? Yeah. Seen that. Mistreat the bike and break? Seen that too. The infamous JRA? Yup. Seen that too. IME a warranty isn't as important as it was.

    I thought EVERYbody knew that buying stuff from shop employees was about the best way to save $$. After all, we get it for less up front and typically pass on the savings. (and you can get next year's stuff cheap too once we upgrade again!)

    M

    edited to add: the stock rim strips on Bontrager wheels ARE NOT tubeless compatible. :nono You need the plastic rim strips for that. The plastic rim strips and regular tubeless valves work very well. AMHIK
    Mr Head and YakSpout like this.
  18. dogsslober

    dogsslober No neck tie, Ti neck

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,163
    Location:
    Morgan Hill Ca
    Not sure if you can get it down where you are," Gorilla tape" the rims or get some Stans tape and double wrap them
    YakSpout likes this.
  19. cjbiker

    cjbiker Nobody's Robot

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,906
    Location:
    Southern Maine
    Ok, the guy is dumb. 3
  20. Ridge

    Ridge Mischevious Disruptor

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,000
    Location:
    Cackalacky
    Setting up tubeless and getting it to work consistently is all in the prep and attention to the little details. I have four bikes; road, CX/Gravel, two MTBs, and 7 sets of wheels that are used between them. All are set up tubeless, all are performing as they should, and have done so for 3-4 years now. All my tires and rims are designed for tubeless use.

    Many problems I've troubleshot with local friends/riders were on setups never designed for tubeless. Can it be done... sometimes; is it recommended, not really, as your tire connection to the riding surface is kind of critical to safety.

    Using proper rim tape, at the proper width is key to set up. You want it to be wide enough to cover the spoke holes, but not so wide that it interferes with seating the bead. Gorilla tape works excellent but you take a slight hit to weight vs. dedicated rim tapes. I've used Stan's tape, Pacenti, American Classic, and DT Swiss; with DT being preferred. When taping, I start about 2 inches on one side of the valve hole, then wrap at least twice and stop about 2 inches on the opposite side of the valve hole. I've never had a loss of air through the spoke holes with this method. Any air losses are almost always due to burps from landing too hard, or one freak time where I took a turn too fast and rolled the tire right off the bead.

    Nearly all of my valves are Stan's, and I purchased a 10 pack of Vittoria valve cores to swap out when they clog. They can be cleaned but it's tedious work. I've tried TruckerCo, Vittoria, AmClassic, and a few others but the Stan's design with the coned rubber always seems to perform most consistently.

    I set the beads with an air compressor and with no sealant in the tire before taking any further steps. I'll go back the next day to see if the bead is still set and the air is holding... most times it is, but there have been setups where I needed to address tape that was too wide, or valves that weren't tight enough. The tire, if tubeless-ready, should hold air at pressure without any sealant solution inside. I also seat the beads without the valve core installed. The air compressor chuck fits over the valve body just fine but you'll need to be quick with a thumb to cover the hole as soon as the bead is set and the tire is up to pressure., then quick again to plug the hole with the core and screw it in. With practice, there is an insignificant loss of pressure throughout this process.

    If the tire/wheel holds air overnight without any sealant solution; I'll remove the valve core again, then using an Orange Seal bottle with hose over the valve body; add the requisite amount of solution. MTB tires get 4oz, CX/gravel tires get 3oz, and road gets 2oz. I use the valve body for fill because the bead is already set and I don't want to go through that process again. I then clean the valve body with a cotton swab, and re-install the valve core.

    This is important, turn the wheel so that the valve is at the 12 o'clock position before adding any air. This ensures the sealant solution is at the bottom of the tire and you don't risk clogging the valve on the first fill. Make this a habit for all future air top-offs.

    Once the tire is back up to pressure, hold it horizontally out in front of you and move the sealant solution around the bead of the tire for a minute or so, then flip the tire over and repeat for the other bead.

    As for sealant, I've used Stan's, Slime, and Orange Seal with OS being my favorite. I found Stan's has some corrosive properties to it over extended periods, as well as getting the dreaded "stanimals" from the latex bunching up and drying. Slime stays in a liquid state the longest by a good margin but is much more dense than the other two so it carries a weight penalty, though it seals exceptionally well. Orange Seal is the happy medium. It remains in a liquid state the longest, has some glitter-flake in the solution to aid sealing, and doesn't tend to coagulate into large latex "boogers" like Stan's.

    So, to summarize:

    - Ensure tire and rim are tubeless-ready.
    - Wrap tape sufficiently, but not so wide as to interfere with bead setting.
    - Puncture the tape at the valve hole with a screwdriver that is slightly smaller in diameter to the valve body.
    - Ensure the valve is adequately covering the hole and is tight to both the tape surface as well as the threaded ring on the outside of the rim ( I will often press my thumb against the valve rubber while I'm tightening the threaded retaining ring).
    - Spray a little solution of dish soap and water all along the bead of the rim. This aids the tire to pop into the bead. Like 1Tsp:pint of water. It just needs a little help.
    - Seat the bead and listen for the pings, then inspect all along the bead for even setting. There is a raised "ring" of rubber a few millimeters from the bead that provides a visual reference for correct distance. If that ring is trapped under the bead, or looks uneven in distance anywhere around the circumference; the bead is not correctly set. (This is the same method if you're using tubes).
    - Read the specs on the sidewall of the tire to learn what the maximum pressures are for that specific tire. Manufacturers have set limits on maximum air pressure before it will blow off the bead. Check that the tire holds air without any sealant. I wait 24 hours.
    - Add the sealant through the valve body and give it a quick swipe before re-installing the core.
    - Rotate the valve to the 12 o'clock position and air up your tire to desired pressure.

    My tires will lose a couple of psi between rides, and some setups will lose pressure at different rates, but none of them have lost the bead, or unseated the tire.

    Is it a little involved, yes... but once set, it's unlikely you'll have to futz with it for months, at least until you decide to check the sealant levels/condition and/or top it off... even then, I usually only have to unseat the bead for a few inches at the opposite side of the valve to visually check and that's about every 6 months to annually.

    If mounting an older tire that was previously used in a tubeless application; it's worth the time and effort to work around the tire bead to remove any dried latex that would interfere with bead setting. The same holds true for the bead seat in the rim wall. Dried or bunched latex hiding in there will interfere with bead seating and air retention.

    I guess I could make a video to show some of these procedures and tips, but have my doubts it would have any value over what's already out there.



    Sent from my PU-286 Explosive Space Modulator
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