Bicycle thread

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Zodiac, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Zodiac

    Zodiac loosely portrayed

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2001
    Oddometer:
    31,794
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    My Surly is all steel, and rides smooth as a cadillac, if you're going to go for steel, go all the way.

    My rule for components is this = buy the best you can afford:deal... The new Ultegra is supposedly incredible stuff, and the better the gruppo, the less adjusting, repairing, cleaning, tightening, and wear and tear. A clean click shift and all things like a swiss clock feels great when tuned. You'll be in awe after riding Sora..
  2. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    22,416
    Location:
    Masshole
    Thanks :thumb

    Now....can I see myself riding an orange bike I ask myself....:lol3
  3. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Oddometer:
    28,982
    Location:
    NoVA for now...
    :*sip*

    Mornin all. 57min on the bike at 20-something degrees out. :vardy Good thing I've invested in great clothes!

    rant
    There's a bunch of whiny little bitches in the club associated with the shop. Won't go out riding under 40deg. :cry Too cold! Waaa! :cry HTFU ya sissy Marys! Geez! Its not like we're in fucking Alaska or anything! This is Northern VA!
    /rant

    re steel forks: the biggest difference between steel and CF forks is the road buzz that gets thru on the steel fork but not on the CF fork. Big hits feel about the same on either. Steel is gonna be more 'forgiving' to live with for longer. ie: you don't hafta worry about mistreating it as much.

    M
  4. Zodiac

    Zodiac loosely portrayed

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2001
    Oddometer:
    31,794
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    PS - That bike has a very good wheelset, don't change out the rear - keep them paired - they're bulletproof and will last forever.
  5. Zodiac

    Zodiac loosely portrayed

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2001
    Oddometer:
    31,794
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    M, don't you think the buzz is more so when you're on an aluminum bike (with an aluminum fork) than when you're on a steel bike?

    My theory is like a shock absorber; road is rough gives buzz from the ground up. As it travels up the steel fork into a steel frame it dissipates or goes through to the other end like a conductor. If it's a CF fork, it's meeting the other (different since it's a different material and resonates differently) material like steel or aluminum and they're repelling each other - like two different pitched tuning forks i.e. more buzz...

    Since aluminum is so buzzy any CF at the lower ground level absorbs vibes well. So this works for alum bike frames.
    But IMHO steel soaks up vibes better than CF, so CF forks on a steel bike is a wash. All you're creating is 2 different frequencies that meet at the headset - and most CF forks have a steel or aluminum steerer tube anyway (not high end).

    Or maybe I'm just crazy....:lol3
  6. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Oddometer:
    28,982
    Location:
    NoVA for now...
    I was on a steel cross bike with a steel fork. Buzzy...

    Same bike path the next day on the CF fork? No buzz.

    M
  7. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,321
    Location:
    central IL
    Which is why I don't do group rides. There are always the crybabies who find something to bitch about. They can't just enjoy a ride.
  8. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,321
    Location:
    central IL
    I don't know if your theory is correct, as I believe carbon to have natural damping qualities. But, your thinking seems to be similar to my experience.

    Again, I'm talking my new bike versus the old. Even though my Tricross has carbon seatpost, seatstays, and fork, it still has more buzz throughout than the vintage bike. And again, the Tricross is on 32mm Contis and the BSA is on 28mm Panaracers. IDK. Maybe I just need to go order a Vaya (It's orange, this year! :clap And, only $1500 with Apex.) to figure this all out. :evil

    [​IMG]
  9. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    5,112
    Location:
    Pittsburgh PA
    The Vaya is an awesome bike. All the pictures of it with the high rise stem and the saddle nose pointing up make puke in my mouth a little but i still want one.
  10. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,321
    Location:
    central IL
    Makes me wanna' throw on an aerobar and go. :lol3
  11. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    22,416
    Location:
    Masshole
    I did like the look of those wheels to be honest so that is good info to know.
  12. fullmonte

    fullmonte Reformed Kneedragger

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,434
    Location:
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    From now on you guys can call me fullNancyboy, in this thread only.:deal FNB did ride 115 miles of singletrack in February. My toes (even with booties) get frozen at road bike speeds when its under 40F. They refuse to thaw out until immersed in hot water.:huh The short winters here are a huge plus.
  13. TheNedster

    TheNedster Lurkapotamus

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Oddometer:
    890
    Location:
    Perched atop the Great Central Valley
    I had the same problem even with good socks and ducnut's el cheapo plastic bag toe warmers (don't laugh, they help!). My bicycle sensei had me loosen the straps on my shoes; instant improvement due to increased bloodflow to the tootsies. Might be worth a try if you haven't already.
  14. fullmonte

    fullmonte Reformed Kneedragger

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,434
    Location:
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Now you tell me. Got any pics?:ear Day time highs haven't dropped below 60 in over two weeks.:D The short of it is I've recently rediscovered how much fun mtb single track can be, since we have some new trails that are close (a 10 minute drive)to the house. That, coupled with the harshest winter in years, has kept me off the road bike. I figured I'd wait until most of the salt/sand grit gets washed off the roads before jumping back into it. The winters here are very Seattle like in nature with lots of rain. We got snow twice and then nothing, in terms of precip.
  15. elchulopadre

    elchulopadre Hairodynamic

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,997
    Location:
    subject to change
    Compact cranks are basically two-chainring cranks with a smaller bolt-circle diameter, which normally accomodate smaller chainrings. A typical 'standard' crank can have 53 teeth on the big'un, and 39 on the small 'un, where the compact might typically have 48 and 34, respectively. Actually, your bike comes with a 50/34, so it's almost undoubtedly a compact - I don't think you can get anything smaller than a 38 to fit on a standard crank.

    Smaller chainrings sacrifice top speed in exchange for more options on the low end. An additional benefit is that it lets you run a cassette with few gaps in between the gears (like an 11-23, for example), giving you a much more even distribution of your gear ratios. The problem with standard cranks is that a lot of these ratios are unusable by mere mortals.

    Nothing wrong with steel, nothing wrong with ultegra. The spec of the motobecane looks pretty good, actually. Unless you're looking at the blue one, in which case it's crap. :D
  16. rbrsddn

    rbrsddn 3banger

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,944
    Location:
    Madison,CT
    My buddy went with the Compact crank when he built up his Trek Madone. Not sure the ratios, but I think the big ring is 48 T. I've got the 39/53 standard cranks, but am going up to a 27 Cassette. Next build will most likely have the Compact. Ultegra is a very durable gruppo. No need for Dura Ace unless you want the bling factor.
  17. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    22,416
    Location:
    Masshole
    :rofl

    Goddammit, it's looking more and more likely I am going to go orange (never thought I'd say that about a bike....) :lol3
  18. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Oddometer:
    20,103
    Location:
    SOP - south of Phoenix, hotter n hell
    All these posts about bicycles and equipment - I'd love to hear of your goals for bicycling.
  19. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    22,416
    Location:
    Masshole
    I guess my primary goal is to get fit and lose weight. I have tried many things and cycling just suits me the best - I am no lightweight so running regularly is out and while I used to swim a ton, it hurt my shoulders and it was just a PIA to do, especially if you have people who have no freaking idea how to swim lanes.

    That said, I LOVE cycling as it gets me out and about and I really feel like I'm doing something good for my body.

    Not really a regrets kind of person but I sure wish I'd found cycling 20 years ago....
  20. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Oddometer:
    28,982
    Location:
    NoVA for now...
    Actually... the 50 x 11 combo feels almost exactly like a 53 x 12 combo so you're not losing out on the top end either.

    I toodled along on my cross bike this AM. It has a compact crank on it. I find myself in the big ring longer. Only shifting to the inner when the road points up.

    After a few weeks of riding only the compact crank, the regular rings on my other bikes felt HUGE!!!

    M