Biffed off the Beemer...

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by C-Stain, Apr 23, 2013.

  1. C-Stain

    C-Stain Accredited Nincompoop

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    Thanks! Email replied to...
    #41
  2. fredgreen

    fredgreen Proud Canoodian

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    pics of tire tracks as requested, it appears to be an overcorrection, then lowside. I would think the foot went down instinctively, got caught, then twisted and was crushed from above by the weight of the bike and the dude riding it. Craig is still lying where he landed in the first pic, all I did was pick the bike up and put the sidestand down, so the angle it is pointed is exactly where it was pointed after the dismount.

    [​IMG]

    here you can see the tracks of the beemer clearly on the right side of the pic

    [​IMG]
    #42
  3. C-Stain

    C-Stain Accredited Nincompoop

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    Busting out of the hospital today and heading home! Was told by the surgeon that I needed to master stairs on crutches and after I went up and down at supersonic KLR speed - they gave me a handful of dilaudid and said, "Get the fuck outta here!"

    Waiting for Mrs and the Stain-mobile, but should be free and clear in a couple of hours!
    #43
  4. Eyes Shut

    Eyes Shut See no evil

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    Ouch! You have my sympathies! When I broke my tib/fib/ankle, no weight bearing for me for 12 weeks. Hopefully, you will be PWB long before that! Heal up quickly. :1drink

    Also, you probably already know about these things, but I found a fleece toe cover to be really nice to keep the piggies warm, and this Dry Pro cast cover made showering possible:
    http://store.drycorp.com/Dry-Pro-Waterproof-Leg-Cast-Bandage-Protector-s/39.htm
    #44
  5. dresda

    dresda shut up and RIDE!

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    Ewwww, Craig, so sorry to hear of your misadventure. So glad you had your buddies along to help and take documentary photos to share with the world. That reminds me I need to stop riding in touring boots and get something taller and with more protection.

    I hope you heal fast. I spent 3 months in a cast and a few years hobbling after a car accident. Not a fun time. I didn't have to lie in the mud for three hours waiting for the ambulance though. Arggg. :eek1

    Take care and I hope we see you in August.
    #45
  6. Emmbeedee

    Emmbeedee Procrastinators

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    Wow, that sucks. Too bad it happened at all but to be at the start of the season is doubly cruel.

    Sure hope you're not in too much pain, and that you heal up well, and quickly!
    #46
  7. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    Here's hoping for a speedy recovery!

    I saw this happen to a rider at walking speed last September.

    Maybe we need a "show me your x-ray thread"?

    Maybe not. :cry
    #47
  8. TagBagger

    TagBagger Adventurer

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    Get better fast Craig
    #48
  9. kelsow

    kelsow Long timer

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    I'd just like to share that it was Craig's birthday on the 1st.

    Can't tink of a worse way to spend it but keep the faith, pip pip, chin up and all that jazz.
    #49
  10. Daytrader

    Daytrader Elitist Bastard

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    Have a Keiths.
    Get well soon.
    #50
  11. C-Stain

    C-Stain Accredited Nincompoop

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    Thanks Kelsow!

    It may not be the perfect way to spend a birthday or to look at spending the summer, but its a far better fate than the friend who's funeral I have to go to tomorrow.

    I appreciate all the comments from folks here and all the support from friends and family.
    #51
  12. CallMeBoog

    CallMeBoog hi functioning idiom

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    It was good to see you and the lovely Mrs. Yesterday.
    #52
  13. Crisis management

    Crisis management Latte riders FTW!

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    At the risk of offending everyone involved....:hide



    Why you didn't you stuff Mr Stain into the Ural and drive him closer to help?

    A couple of reasons to ask this:
    The road looks in reasonable condition so shouldn't be too uncomfortable to travel on.
    He's a paramedic so should be able to splint the leg reasonably, equally I appreciate he's in the best position to decide what the best course of action is.
    It sounds like there was a long wait for help, could that have been shortened?

    The primary reason I ask this that over the last few years (as we age, most of my riding buddies are in their late 50's) I have been involved in incidents resulting in broken collar bones, feet, ankles etc usually in remote places. Our general solution has been to ride the patient out as they were capable of doing that rather than waiting 6 hours for an airlift. Again, I realise there is a point where you can't ride out and I'm interested in your opinion of this particular incident so I can store away your experience in my memory banks for when we need it next (probably the end of May, big off-road meeting in our central mountain area :D).

    Hope your feeling better, looked like a great place to ride.
    #53
  14. fredgreen

    fredgreen Proud Canoodian

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    I asked him that too, the leg was too badly damaged to even move him without a stretcher. The road was very bad too, the pics don't show the 12 km of hell we drove down. It took the wahbulance almost 2 hours to drive him the 12km. I tried to get a chopper called to airlift him from the site, that didn't happen, so they ambulanced him to the hospital, took one look at the leg, then called a chopper to come and get him and take him to Halifax!
    #54
  15. C-Stain

    C-Stain Accredited Nincompoop

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    No offense taken, all fair questions.

    The road was actually much worse than it looked in the photos. Travelling out in the ambulance was like travelling over the 7 layers of hell, and that was after 15-20mg of Morphine and 2mg of Versed.

    I considered the splinting, but when I started moving I could tell right away that I was dealing with an unstable, closed fracture. Additionally, when I wound up on the ground I was laying on the affected side. Even the slightest movement caused a pain scale of 10/10. There would be no way that I could have been splinted well enough to be put in the Ural Chair and be driven out without causing more damage.

    The wait could have been shortened if someone had decided to do a LifeFlight launch to the scene. However, Policy states that either an Ambulance or Medical First Response Fire Crew must be on scene to order the launch. The VERY rural fire department didn't think that a landing was possible. Therefore, no Chopper till the Critical Care Transport.

    I think that when I'm back riding again I will be carrying a much better First Aid kit. Mind you, narcotic pain meds aren't going to be in the mix, but certainly will be including some Ibuprofen or Tylenol. Given where we were, and the nature of the injury, I don't know if there would be anything we could have done differently. Had I been the responder, I may have pushed a little harder for a landing site to have the patient (in this case, me) airlifted from the scene. However, that day, it was not my call.

    If the person can be moved towards Medical Care SAFELY, I have no problem with that. However, you must be cognisant of any possible neuro-vascular damage that you may do by not splinting or immobilizing properly. Again, if you look at the X-ray pic in post 1, you can see that there are multiple fractures. Mine was not a simple case.

    I would recommend that more than one of you be trained in Wilderness First Aid or someone look at taking an EMT-Basic program to supplement any existing training you may have.

    Hope this helps. I should be posting a bit of an update tomorrow. Ortho Clinic first thing in the afternoon.
    #55
  16. Crisis management

    Crisis management Latte riders FTW!

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    Thanks for the replies, I appreciate the depth of explanation C-Stain, that puts quite a different complexion on the matter and raises the issues of lack of understanding of injuries and the consequences of moving people unsupported.
    You mention Wilderness first aid (not something we have here) but I imagine is similar to the offshore yachting first aid training we have (years in the coastguard, so everything in my toolbox is marine based). I will have a look at that, as your standard first aid is really stop em bleeding, keep em breathing and yell for help. Not much use when help isn't coming.

    Good stuff to learn from, some of the places we ride are remote and I wouldn't have liked to deal with your injury with only the skills I have at present.
    #56
  17. Hawk

    Hawk Pretentious Fukwit!!

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    Stoopid Canoodians :deal

    Craig, I hope you heal quickly and never break another bone. A biff like that will leave a mark for a long time.

    Do you need me to come up and ride your bike for you while you recuperate?? :ear
    #57
  18. Trane Francks

    Trane Francks Been here awhile

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    Nasty business. Good friends. Excellent advice about wilderness first aid/EMT-basic training.

    Heal well!
    #58
  19. Emmbeedee

    Emmbeedee Procrastinators

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    Would a Spot unit have helped decrease the response time? All three of us carry one on our bikes at all times. And I have a spare I can send you if you want it.
    #59
  20. fredgreen

    fredgreen Proud Canoodian

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    Spot is great to have, and Craig and I carry one regularly, but in this case, with road access to our location, local rescue was the best course of action. Cell phone reception was available, so 911 was called. With Spot, the SOS would go to Houston, Texas, who would then call the appropriate Canadian authourities, in this case the RCMP and Rescue Coordination Center in Halifax. They would determine which resources to send at that time. It was a faster response time through cell phone. One thing to keep in mind though when using cell phones, take a GPS with you, as cell phone locators used by the 911 dispatch are on the nearest cell tower, in our case 6km away from our location. It took me 5 minutes to convince the dispatcher of our actual location.
    #60