Bigger chain for KLR hack?

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by JerryAtrick, Sep 26, 2017.

  1. JerryAtrick

    JerryAtrick Adventurer

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    Gen 1 KLR685 with a fairly porky sidecar. Couple people have suggested going to a 525 chain and sprockets (stock is 520). Seems like an easy and logical beef-up of the drive train. Anything I'm missing here?
    #1
  2. CCjon

    CCjon HighHorse Rider

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    None that I can think of. Am running the 525 chain with 525 sized rear sprocket and counter sprocket. You can also just run the larger 525 chain and leave the sprockets OEM. Some of the dirt riders do that so mud and sand are allowed to escape from between the 525 chain and the 520 sprockets.

    The dimensions for the 520 and 525 are identical except for the side plates which are slightly thicker thus stronger.
    #2
  3. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Actually, if I was upgrading, I'd be more interested in reducing sprocket wear than chain wear. But that's me. I figger if I break a chain out in the middle of nowhere, either I'm carrying a spare or I have a chain repair tool and some links. But swapping out sprockets is a much bigger PITA even if I'm home in the garage. Might depend on your appetite for wrenching. :puke1
    #3
  4. FR700

    FR700 Heckler ™©®

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    It doesn't really get much easier to change sprockets on a KLR', whether in the field or at home in the shop.


    #4
  5. High Octane

    High Octane Long timer

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    Except when you can't break that f'n nut loose! I had to cut it off my Versys rig.
    #5
  6. JerryAtrick

    JerryAtrick Adventurer

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    CS nut's a bitch if you torque it to the recommended spec. Eagle Mike recommends that spec but it's widely believed (including by me) that if you use his prevailing torque nut, you can drop down to a manageable degree of "tight."

    http://eaglemike.com/Prevailing-torque-nut-PTN.htm
    #6
  7. norton(kel)

    norton(kel) vintage

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    I have not yet replaced the stock chain on my '09 KLR and it has 26000 miles on it, 15000 of those with the sidehack on! Keep the chain clean & lubed!
    #7
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  8. BigFatAl

    BigFatAl Been here awhile

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    I've changed my KLR CS sprocket on the trail a couple times with no issue !!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #8
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  9. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

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    What do you all use for chain lube?
    #9
  10. FR700

    FR700 Heckler ™©®

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    DSC00538.JPG
    #10
  11. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    [​IMG]
    #11
  12. brstar

    brstar Been here awhile

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    Slippery sticky tacky stuff.
    #12
  13. JerryAtrick

    JerryAtrick Adventurer

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    Scott Oiler with their branded oil. $$$ no object!
    #13
  14. DavePave

    DavePave Been here awhile

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    On my DR 650 I use Chain Wax, probably basically the same as the above product. The key to using it seems to be to clean the chain after you ride, then spray the chain down. It sucks all that waxy goodness inside as it cools. I've got about 30K on my latest chain, so far almost zero stretch & no wear on sprockets either.....
    #14
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  15. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    No wear on the sprockets? Are you sure you are riding it? Maybe it's actually on a trailer and you only THINK you are riding it? :rofl
    #15
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  16. DavePave

    DavePave Been here awhile

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    Yes, I ride it. My bike has never been on a trailer or tow truck (yet, LOL). Theoretically, if the chain has sufficient lube, its internal workings won't wear as much. If the chain doesn't stretch (from internal metal wear) and if adjusted properly; Why would the sprockets wear as much in any given time/mileage period?

    No double entendre intended but, follow the chain of events. If I can slow or completely arrest chain wear, I've arrested the entire follow on process of sprocket wear. Regardless of how it's done, proper chain lube is necessary to lengthen the life of each component in the system.

    Not wanting to start a chain lube (or oil) thread, but I've found chain wax (and similar) to work very well for me in my environment.

    A chain is just an open final drive that isn't constantly bathed in oil. Some oils work better than others. Certainly you can see that running less than the needed amount of oil in your final drive wouldn't be optimum. Conversely, getting an oil to stick to an open chain that lubricates, reduces metal wear (etc) should provide a similar optimized result. It'll never be perfect, just optimized.

    All I am saying is that I find the parafilm based "waxy oils" to be a large improvement over regular mineral oil (only) based products. Because they stick inside of and on the outside of chains longer.

    One more upside of this type of product over mineral oil based products is, that in sufficient quantities to cover the chain - it encases the chain in a waterproof barrier. In my thinking making it more suitable for Adventure riding (water crossings) as opposed to oils that can rinse or fling off.

    Only downside is that they do attract more dirt - so cleaning after every (off-asphalt) ride is mandatory (in my thinking).

    YMMV

    Edit: I meant to add: That the OP is correct 525 chain side plates are thicker and stronger. Which seems like a good reason to run it.

    I seem to remember a thread from some time ago that delved into this topic, and the result was most people felt us DR650 & KLR drivers should run the 520 chain because it is more popular and more readily available in most bike shops, right off the shelf. 525 chain, IIRC isn't always in stock - apparently less bikes use it as compared to 520.

    Point being, that if you run 525 and you're on a ride (not in a large metropolis), you might have hard time finding a replacement that doesn't force you to also change your sprockets at the same time. And that's only if the shop that happens to be open that day, might also have the sprockets for your particular bike.

    Then again, carrying an extra chain and sprockets in your ADV kit resolves that issue.

    Again, YMMV
    #16
  17. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Only because the front sprocket has 15 teeth while the chain has 106 links. Each tooth goes around 7 times for each time a link goes around.

    But otherwise I agree 100% with everything you said here. ^^^
    #17
  18. BigFatAl

    BigFatAl Been here awhile

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    I use ( and have been for many years ) motor oil on my chains.Most of the time used oil from my bike.


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    #18