Bikes you didn't like nearly as much as you thought you would.

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by davidji, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. 10/10ths

    10/10ths Road Trip Fool

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    .......I still own all three of the bikes I have purchased in my life.

    Having said that, I have dumped a TON of money into all three to modify all of them to fit MY BODY type.

    I firmly believe that ANY bike that ANYONE buys will have to be custom fitted to its owner.

    As far as the V-Stroms being boring. Absolutely Boring. Yes they are. Which is why they are AWESOME!!!!!

    What's the old curse? "May you live in interesting times"?

    I put a Scorpion exhaust can on the V-Strom and completely replaced the suspension. She's a lot more fun, and just as reliable. Costs coin, however, to reach that point.

    I have the Monster and the RC51 for "non-boring" rides.

    My thoughts are that since every bike needs money spent on it to make it comfy for your body, you should just buy the machine that appeals to you and understand that you WILL add a new seat, windscreen, shock, fork internals, pegs, rearsets, etc., to make it comfy for YOU.

    Cheers.
  2. Rinty

    Rinty Been here awhile

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    I always find it interesting how people react to different bikes. I notice that with mature riders, it's usually ergonomics.

    I've had two great BMWs, boxers, prior to my current one, and have some nits, but I'm not going there. :lol3
  3. Cakeeater

    Cakeeater Been here awhile

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    True.

    Fun thread to read. Age affects a lot. Bikes I loved as kid now would make me go "meh". As a youngster I would have laughed at the road sofa I ride now. Life changes.

    Cakeeater
  4. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Agreed. Someone said they didn't like the Tiger 800XC because it had bad air flow, was too tall, and too squirly. Those all sound like selling points to me. Raw experience, good ground clearance, and manueverable...

    All the discussion about feet forward seating position on cruisers got me thinking, though. What do you do to lift your butt off the seat to regain blood flow when cruising on the highway for extended periods? I was beginning to be tempted by the HD V-Rod, until I thought about that...Maybe brace your feet on the pegs and pull on the handlebars until your butt lifts off the seat? I'd hate to think what would happen if one hand slipped while trying to do that. :eek1
  5. hugemoth

    hugemoth Long timer

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    I think you're right, ergonomics is a big factor. With long arms and legs I've modified every bike I've owned to make them more comfortable. Why don't they make bikes more adjustable?

  6. A.S.F.

    A.S.F. Adventurer

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    Oregon
    2005 Z750s. I read all the reviews and thought to myself, I can fix the crap seat and put up with the buzzing...... :doh
    Rode it for a few thousand miles, didn't like it the whole time, didn't change a thing and sold it.
  7. Cakeeater

    Cakeeater Been here awhile

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    Add a backrest. Then you can push against it with your back with your feet on the pegs/floorboards. Lifts your butt. Doesn't require any arm pull. I ride with no hands, butt off the saddle on my Road Glide just for amusement on long rides.

    Cakeeater
  8. blk-betty

    blk-betty bam-a-lam

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    Never had an issue with blood flow or sore butt on a cruiser, but I've swapped all the seats for a hard ass Corbin.

    When riding a non cruiser, I feel the need to "stand" or hang my legs off the pegs simply to stretch my legs/knees. After a cross country trip on a Tiger 1050 I was jonesing bad for my '06 Street Glide just 3 days into a 10 day ride. Sold the Tiger (which I really thought was going to replace the Harley as my distance touring bike) 2 weeks after returning home from the trip. Traded the Street Glide on a '12 Road Glide 6 months after selling the Tiger. Yep, it's a heavy pig but damn comfortable and can be ridden much more spirited than many will ever know.
  9. dddd

    dddd Been here awhile

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    i had a 13 years old malaguti '77 moped, 30 cc, 2 stroke we rode in gravel. It could not climb a 1% grade and I think my father chainsaw was less smelly and less noisy...

    What? that the only other bike I know... cant complain about my "perfect" ninja 650r
    :D
  10. Unleaded

    Unleaded Unit Train

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    Absolutely. I've never owned a cruiser....only even ridden a couple. The new-framed Road Glide was one of them. Really, really nice bike. Shockingly so.

    And to stay on topic with this thread....1200GSA for me. It was a strange relationship I had with that thing. Not to be misunderstood, it was one of the finest motorcycles I've ever ridden. When I've been on longish rides I've missed it terribly. An absolute dream for long hauls, and as most know, well-acquitted in the bendy stuff. If I can afford a multi-bike stable one day, I'll own one again for distance work, no question. But as an all-around, one-bike-to-rule-them-all (which is what it is often labeled as) for the mostly local riding I do, it was too much of a good thing, and just not very inspiring.
  11. oldenuf

    oldenuf Been here awhile

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    Back in 1985 bought a K100RT, and thought it was a good machine, so when a low mileage, totally stock 1985 K100RS came up for sale at a local BMW dealer I took a look and test rode it and ended up buying it. I put a summer's worth of riding on it and it ran as well as could be expected.

    What I found was that it was indeed a 27 year old motorcycle. The shifting was poor, and the handling was not the best, doing the old "tail wag" when pushed to hard in the corners. It had a lot of good features, but I was glad to pass it on, and go back to riding a new motorcycle.

    Art
  12. dmac57

    dmac57 Long timer

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    2001 CBR929RR. Only bike I've ever owned that I just didn't "make friends" with. Couldn't find it's "happy place" on the street or on the track. My lap times were probably just as good on an SV650 that I could just thrash. Put less than 1K on it. Traded it and a VFR straight up for an RSV Mille.
  13. nimbus9

    nimbus9 n00b

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    I started out on a 2011 Triumph Bonneville and rode it for 3500 miles before realizing I had the wrong bike. Things begin to look grim when I was trying to turn the bike into something it wasn't - that is something more like the Speed Triple which I ended up trading the Bonerville in for.

    I came back from a 700 mile ride and found that lack of high-end power made me bored of reading bumper stickers as I lacked the power to overtake other vehicles on mountain roads. I also learned that I don't care for chrome.

    I test drove a ducati streetfighter thinking I would give another manufacturer a go. The ergonomics did not instill me with confidence and I did not care for being almost over the front bars. Driving it only a short time left me with a feeling of needing to wear and Affliction t-shirt and ride up and down Venice beach. It had one of those ridiculously overpriced exhausts and it had a loud, throaty growl but really did not see the low rev torque that the Triple had in heaps.
  14. warewolf

    warewolf Tyre critic

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    Vive la difference! :evil

    I studiously avoid such carry-on. Most riding instructors say you should always be in a gear that responds briskly to the throttle = about 3d maybe 4th gear on most bigger bikes at urban cruise.
  15. davidji

    davidji bike curious

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    Even when they both like the same bike. For example, I love that bike, but I can't imagine riding mine that way. Aren't you lugging it at 35MPH in 6th?

    If you want to accelerate hard, all you need to do is downshift...4 gears.
  16. malott442

    malott442 Loud, yet refreshing

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    1. Superhawk.

    Too much low end, not enough top end.

    2. Husqvarna TE610

    Too much vibrations to ever ride it to the dirt spots. Otherwise a ridiculously awesome steed.

    3. My current Ulysses.

    Never knew Erik built a bike that handled poorly. With bags loaded and a passenger it will nearly wheelie through corners. Very off balance and sprung too soft to properly support one rider, much less 2.
  17. DC2wheels

    DC2wheels Castle Anthrax troll

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    Oh thank dog. I thought I was the oddball. Never really liked it.

    The '09 C-14 was the first bike I ever bought without a test ride (Big mistake #1)

    First bike that I had to put $$$ into within the first month and still never got comfortable. Changed the seat, windshields (2), passenger pegs, throttle barrel to a G2, heat blockers, rear rack , plus more that I am forgetting. And because of my freakishly long arms, the "handlebars" were too high and too close to me- can't change them because you can't (the whole list makes up Big mistake #2)

    Don't get me started about that STUPID keyless fob system. Who thought that one up? (That's their mistake)

    Or that I had to replace tires before 5000 miles- front worn out.

    Even after replacing the throttle barrel with a G2, the throttle action at part throttle (right between accel and decel) made it very hard to be smooth- Cathy actually had neck pain after a couple of 2-up day trips.

    Want to do maintenance? Lots of plastic to remove. LOTS.

    And last but not least, it was HEAVY and the constant worry of an accidental tipover that would have broken lots of that plastic.

    Biggest mistake of all? I sold my '93 BMW K1100RS right after I brought the Kawi whale home. DUMB. :cry


    Later in the same year I sold it at a pretty big loss and found a '92 K100RS- like going home.
  18. oalvarez

    oalvarez Resident Raggamuffin

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    That would be the '12 Guzzi V7 Classic for me. Cute bike and all, but contrary to logical thought, if it were a true classic/vintage bike I would probably have been ok with it!
  19. TRRcheck

    TRRcheck Been here awhile

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    Funny you mention the XR1200.. Of course, I own one and absolutely LOVE it :D. Recently, I came up with a list of 15 things I want in my next bike.. The XR1200 had only 1 out of 15 on list of "must haves". Oddly enough, I love my bike and will never sell it, unless extreme circumstances arose.

    Don't ask me why I love the bike, I just do. :rofl
  20. plugeye

    plugeye mc caregiver

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    dr650 although the torque/ powerband was very good & the frame was roomy. the fuel economy sucked, vibration ate tires, chain & sprockets, almost impossible to quiet it down enough for me. and of course the seat was no good.

    also EVERY street bike i ever rode.