BMW X challenge transmission rebuild

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by tele-steve, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    I was following along with the Haynes manual on this one. They use the BMW TDC bolt to lock the crank and then take off the bolt. I made sure to buy the strongest bolt I could (grade 8 or something).
    The first and best option would be to leave the rear swing arm, tire, and chain in place and use the method described above where you leave the bike in gear, have someone hold down the rear brake pedal to keep the engine from rotating over and then use a breaker bar to spin off the nut. I did not have that option because I lost my counter sprocket splines and had no way of stopping the motor from rotating.
    The sequencing of the steps to dismantle the engine can vary in these first steps. It is easiest to get the clutch basket nut and the alternator nut off while the engine is still in the bike so you can use the weight and leverage of the bike to your advantage. Once this is done, you can then drop the engine.
    #21
  2. imeny

    imeny Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Israel
    Thank you guys for the answers :clap
    #22
  3. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    The bike is further apart than when I left all of you because I left my camera at the office and was impatient this weekend.
    So... I got the clutch basket holder on Friday.

    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ScceYwU1PB4/Ui0pMMzI6CI/AAAAAAAACqo/zsQ6TA8uJVw/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252027.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    It was about $28 on line. A quick adjustment and I was able to grab the basket. I placed a 27mm socket on the retaining nut and with some effort, spun the nut off. I'm sure a basket of pennies or rags would do the trick, but for $28 I was willing to use the right tool and not F-up anything in the process.

    Inspecting the clutch basket, I discovered something that I was hoping to find. When I first changed the oil after buying the bike (used), I found a small sliver of a spring attached to the magnetic end of the oil plug. I freaked out a bit because I had just purchase the thing and was thinking my motor was going to explode any minute. I took it to the dealer to have them look it over and they could not figure out where it could have come from. I crossed my fingers at that point and just tried to ignore it. Now with taking the engine out of the bike and cracking the case, I was hoping to find the source of the broken spring.
    And low and behold... it was in the clutch basket.

    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-oN1jBP23Izk/Ui0pRvn-WmI/AAAAAAAACtM/wA8Qlhev48w/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252036.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    It looks like it was a bad cast and there was just enough pressure on the end of the spring to snap it off. Here is what they should look like.

    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-jdZEInc71ow/Ui0pSobcJJI/AAAAAAAACr0/V3UPHXyeZe4/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252037.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    There is no real way to get to these springs as they are riveted into the clutch basket housing. So, I'm going to just be happy that I know where it came from.

    With the clutch out, I started to remove the bolts that hold the left case cover on to gain access to the timing chain, etc. Well, it turns out that there are two bolts that you can't get too unless you remove the engine from the bike because they are covered by the frame.

    I was at Napa Auto Parts earlier in the week and they had the deep 8mm hex socket I was looking for.

    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-6pcFhytvD-A/Ui0pNOk0_nI/AAAAAAAACqs/gRQtLQyuylk/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252029.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    This well endowed socket gave me access to the lower engine mount bolts I was not able to get too earlier. I took out both lower bolts leaving the upper engine bolts (the one's on either side of the head) in place. I placed my jack under the engine to give it support while I released the two final upper bolts.
    Now, the left side bolt is just another hex socket, so that was not a problem, but the right side has the dreaded castle nut. Not wanting to buy a $100 peg spanner from BMW, I took the route others had done and modified a deep socket to fit (in this case a 3/4). A quick tooling with an angle grinder and a file produced this.
    <img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-fCqkmRTJ8Xk/Ui0pO6TyhyI/AAAAAAAACrE/vEdTtjhMZao/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252032.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    It worked perfectly, but what I realized after I got the engine out was that it was completely unnecessary to do this part! YOU DON'T HAVE TO TAKE THE CASTLE NUT OUT TO REMOVE THE ENGINE. It is only used to adjust the play between the engine housing and frame. You only need to remove the two hex bolts on either side of the head to get the engine out of the frame. Trust me on this. The castle nut screws onto the other side of this thing.
    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-2jys8xFHkk4/Ui0pPwEz2vI/AAAAAAAACro/kMtlBqT97CY/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252033.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>
    Once you have the hex bolt out, the engine should slip down past this point.

    Anyways, with all of the bolts out of the frame, I started to lower the engine, but it was not drop down. It was stuck on the upper rear frame bolt location. I looked at the micro fiche to see if I was missing something, but could not see anything obvious.
    I poked around the frame with a screwdriver, hit it with a plastic hammer, etc., but it would not budge. On closer inspection I could see a small shaft/sleeve between the engine and lower frame. Reluctantly, I realized that I now had to remove the cast exterior lower frame elements to get the engine out. I jacked up what was left of the bike to slacken my hanging straps, moved them up the frame, and took off the lower frame elements.
    Here is the lower frame element with the short sleeve from the engine that does not allow you to drop the engine without COMPLETELY dismantling the bike.
    <img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-XNOH_C2aTYo/Ui0pV--6abI/AAAAAAAACsg/xB2goJ2a7i4/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252043.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    Sleeve on the engine case that keeps you from lowering the engine without taking the frame apart.

    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-KabijU-Pgj0/Ui0pVyHjwGI/AAAAAAAACsc/rr7DAbdVKYs/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252042.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    So now, the bike it pretty much completely taken apart.

    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-y5cY8LYrZxk/Ui0pT6R5RoI/AAAAAAAACsE/veei48dXfQ4/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252039.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-dCPPw9ssF-8/Ui0pUSAFD1I/AAAAAAAACsM/DSX1uJdBA24/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252040.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-bb2oueFXpSc/Ui0pYFB7WPI/AAAAAAAACsw/ua_o4Ba738o/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252045.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-mT_nffqAvcU/Ui0pZOE5FpI/AAAAAAAACs8/qy5v_B0rhbg/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252046.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-A4Ex9N6qve4/Ui0paMBbL9I/AAAAAAAACtE/5YRFWFjgGGc/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252047.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    For the electrical connections, I started placing labels with tape so I remember where they plug into.

    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-1HW65rfufPk/Ui0pOUJPW3I/AAAAAAAACq8/uVkg-NwMyJo/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252030.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    The bike itself is a little intimidating to work on, but I'm feeling more and more comfortable with it. It is beautifully engineered, but my god, they completely reinvented every damn thing about a dirt bike frame. No wonder they could not afford to keep producing these things.

    I've got an extended shopping list of bits and pieces I'll need for the replacement of the output shaft (gaskets, seals, etc.). I plan on placing the order this week, but don't expect the parts to come in very fast as I can't imagine many output shafts sitting around on shelves waiting to be placed into one of these bike.
    #23
  4. Niedz

    Niedz Been here awhile

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    Oct 2, 2010
    Oddometer:
    643
    Location:
    Bucks County, PA
    great thread, i feel like i'll be prepared for when my shift shaft breaks off!
    #24
  5. Johnnyboxer

    Johnnyboxer Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,126
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Can you give me a little more details?
    #25
  6. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    • Start with the offset swing arm mounts; one is threaded, the other is not.
    • The 'frame' is actually made up of 5 distinct parts consisting of 3 types of construction: cast aluminum (lower main frame), extruded and welded aluminum (upper main frame), front lower sub-frame (aluminum tube, bend and welded), rear shock mount (cast aluminum).
    • The rear lower main frame components are really complex and asymmetrical right to left to compensate for the location of the output shaft. and is why the swing arm has to mount the way it does (I'll take more detailed photos as I get further along).
    • You have to take apart all of these elements apart to remove the engine using a pretty good spread of tools.
    It is a complete mess of parts that when looked at individually has no resemblance to being connected to or part of a motorcycle, yet when they are all combined and connected it makes for one of the best adventure touring bikes ever made.
    #26
  7. Johnnyboxer

    Johnnyboxer Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,126
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Thanks for the insight, never had one apart

    Seems like they built a pretty good frame around the Rotax motor
    #27
  8. Niedz

    Niedz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Oddometer:
    643
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    Bucks County, PA
    yes when i serviced my rear swing arm bearings i was pretty blown away at the pivot construction. unusual but effective (i suppose).
    #28
  9. GSF1200S

    GSF1200S Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Oddometer:
    977
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I am somebody that swore I would never consider a BMW because they are too heavy, too complicated and break too much. This thread and this bike has me simultaneously convinced of how right and wrong I am. The engine in that xchallenge will do 100k miles before a rebuild (only dual sport single that WILL do it with decent maintenance), its lighter than my DR, it makes good power and Colebatch has proven it will run on shit gas. I agree it has to be one of the best adventure touring dirt bikes ever made, and it is no doubt in my mind the most underrated BMW adventure machine ever made. But god does it look complicated..

    I really would like to know- why do you think the shaft shit itself as it did? I dont really understand what would cause that. Just a defective one that wasnt hardened properly from the factory?

    I ask because I am honestly considering purchasing one for a RTW mount. I cant believe im saying that :huh

    Subscribed and look forward to seeing the internals :lurk
    #29
  10. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool

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    Jul 9, 2007
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    Viva Lost Wages!
    I think it is because the shaft isn't heat treated correctly, or the sprocket guys are hardening the wholes sprocket instead of just the teeth for the chain. I've had two of them do this now, and the second one has only seen BMW sprockets.
    #30
  11. GSF1200S

    GSF1200S Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Oddometer:
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    Austin, Texas
    Wow. Is tearing into the motor the only way to fix it(by replacing the shaft)? Any preventative way you have figured out to avoid the carnage? Seems a shame considering the ridiculous mileage the engine is capable of.
    #31
  12. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool

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    The only way to replace it is to split the cases and get the transmission out. Same deal for the shifter shaft.
    #32
  13. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    From what I've found so far and what I've gleamed from the inter web is that the failure is not with the engine or the output shaft. The failure was with the sprocket. It is clear that the sprocket was not hardened and the tolerance between the sprocket and shaft was too loose. In my case, I bought an aftermarket sprocket that was part of a set (front and rear sprocket + chain). In the future, I will only be putting on OEM front sprocket even if it hurts to make the $42 purchase.
    If there is a weak link in the design of the system, it is the fact that the splines on the output shaft are small. If you compare the output shaft splines on this bike to a proper dirt bike (a KTM 530 or Husaberg 570) the difference is obvious.
    Now, that should not deter you from buying the bike for your trip. It is an incredible bike and probably one of the best for a RTW trip. The motor has proven itself over and over for it's longevity and reliability. It is light, comfortable and highly capable. Just buy an OEM sprocket and if you are concerned, throw some lock tight in there. If you are really concerned, take the route of the XR owners and make three small spot welds between the sprocket and the shaft that can be easily ground off and re-tacked on when you change the sprocket (somewhere in Germany an engineer's pint of beer just spilled across the table).
    #33
  14. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    Buy an OEM sprocket.
    #34
  15. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    Ok.... with the engine out of the frame, you can finally get to the last of the left side bolts that allows you to take off the case that covers the oil pump gears and lower timing chain gear.

    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-uHGgpufpDJw/Uj72k7tHqwI/AAAAAAAACvM/HGpbewGOiDc/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252049.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    Next up was the large 27mm nut on the lower main shaft. This one required the breaker bar and some real elbow grease.

    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-hMrolsx2qUs/Uj72l3D6UpI/AAAAAAAACvk/eWIGls3HfEU/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252051.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    My plan is to leave the oil pump gears in place as I don't see any reason to remove them. I'll be double checking the microfiche to make sure.

    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-LE23WCja2nU/Uj72muzwYQI/AAAAAAAACwA/bn0xVnNPzcw/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252054.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    The front timing chain guide slides right out of the top of the head, but the rear guide can not come out until you have the cylinder off. I was hoping to leave the cams in place and slip the chain off the top, but that is not possible, so I took the cams out by removing the upper mounting bolts.

    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-SMmRy1RuQSQ/Uj72m_BgZ0I/AAAAAAAACwM/WJwde03BIGA/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252055.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-2JCVkRrT9Xg/Uj72nHcy6HI/AAAAAAAACwI/QHALeOwJFUg/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252056.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    Removing the cams drops the chain which allows you to get the gear off.
    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-FMZ4yHn5Djg/Uj72ndwamPI/AAAAAAAACwU/AsyOQwSKsaE/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252057.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    The gear was stuck pretty good, so I used a short wood dowel to lightly lever the gear off making sure to do so from both sides of the shaft.

    <img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Z1Mg1Bt9X6w/Uj72nsa6yBI/AAAAAAAACww/yWjDkeV8cOc/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252058.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JTtNTZWNLfI/Uj72nztBvxI/AAAAAAAACwc/_UNQJtsS4_o/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252059.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    The lower main shaft has a woodruff key to keep the main gear from slipping. It needed some light tapping as well before it released itself from the shaft.

    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-PBrFUfaDl5E/Uj72oPMh3yI/AAAAAAAACwo/YOuNdSUdp_U/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252060.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-NWs4BtSe5AQ/Uj72oUVZ9ZI/AAAAAAAACw0/d5SXumzdWYQ/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252061.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    Up next was the removal of the cylinder and head. I had watched the previous videos where it is possible to leave the piston in the cylinder so that you don't have to deal with the piston rings, so that was the plan.

    <img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-CemW3iYm7CQ/Uj72o-HZCKI/AAAAAAAACxI/Sq7epaW19F4/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252063.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-NEK2lUQumj0/Uj72pHxpTdI/AAAAAAAACxM/CTth0ZaJjHU/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252064.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    It was being a real pain the ass to slip the cylinder off. It was requiring way too much energy to slide the piston out. It was moving, but not as smoothly I had hoped. I was getting close to seeing the piston pin and with one more nudge, I would be there. Unfortunately I nudged it too much and pulled the piston out past the rings. :ddog

    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-hQpP25eVCcI/Uj72pii91LI/AAAAAAAACxg/2ohV1cST0dQ/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252066.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    At this point, I realized why it was so difficult to pull the cylinder off. I had placed the spark plugs back in the head once I got the engine to TDC several weeks ago and never removed them. :beccaThe vacuum of the piston in the cylinder was keeping me from smoothly sliding it off the case.

    The cir clip that holds the piston pin in place was easy to remove and the piston quickly pops off the crank arm. There was more carbon buildup than I thought there would be, but I'm not too sure what I was expecting.

    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Q183OaIcgp8/Uj72qCK-luI/AAAAAAAACxc/q_o4ZjMayrE/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252067.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    Looking into the maw of the beast.
    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-1SIXT5bFQe0/Uj72rRokZtI/AAAAAAAACxo/ADtJUr-YJ30/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252068.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    With the cylinder off, I'm going to wait until I get all of my replacement parts before cracking the case open. My plan is to have everything in place so that I can crack the case, disassemble, and reassemble in one day.
    #35
  16. Niedz

    Niedz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Oddometer:
    643
    Location:
    Bucks County, PA
    wow some good progress!
    #36
  17. michael1968

    michael1968 Long timer

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,001
    Location:
    Newcastle, Australia
    Yep, you only need to remove them if you want to check the oil pumps, since this was an external failure you probably don't need to worry.


    Don't forget to put the rear guide back in before you put the clutch basket back on like I did...
    #37
  18. johncr250

    johncr250 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    33
    Location:
    New York State
    I would have done the same thing!
    #38
  19. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    It turns out that the main shaft needs to be sourced from the Motherland. 1-2 weeks until it hits US shores and then it gets shipped to CO.

    Stay tuned.
    #39
  20. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    I received my part order about a week and half ago, but work has been sucking up all my time, so it took a while for me to get back into the build.

    My next step was to split the case. Following along with the Haynes manual, I made a template to keep track of the bolts and where they were located in the case.

    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-TUk-WG4oacM/Uli-2TnslBI/AAAAAAAAC0o/zav_548MHKE/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252069.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    After removing the bolts, the case is suppose to easily come apart, but mine was not budging. There are two areas on the case where you can lever the sides open and with some gentle prying, but still no-go. WTF? I pondered this a bit more, whacked it with a rubber mallet... nothing. I went back to the inter-web for some searching. I brought up the F650 maintenance video and got a laugh when he mentions splitting the case and not to forget the one bolt that is hard to see located under the oil filter housing. Sure enough, I missed this one. After removing the last bolt, the cases easily lifted apart.

    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-azDVVNLne6Q/Uli-8TCHRPI/AAAAAAAAC1A/6j39OvE2MPc/s640/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252072.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    The process for removing the shift linkage is not very well described or illustrated. It is pretty straight forward though. The shift rod (connected to the shift lever) rests in the case with two springs around it. The rod also acts as a pivot for the gear selector and lever. When you pull the shift rod out, the rest comes with it, leaving the shifter roll, shifter forks, and transmission gears in place.

    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-8iuXlS6tYz4/Uli-4d26luI/AAAAAAAAC0w/OPxvA1qD6Qs/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252071.jpg" height="800" width="600" /></a>

    With that out of the way, you are left looking at this.
    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-qnSrOQ_nWQU/Uli-0n_it_I/AAAAAAAAC0k/1d6XlSxIusw/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252070.jpg" height="600" width="800" /></a>

    <img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ZLehPiUb5aM/Uli--cVuD-I/AAAAAAAAC08/9xkT4A671qo/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252073.jpg" height="600" width="800" /></a>

    To remove the shifting roll, you have to remove/relocate the shifter forks. This is quite easy. Just pull up on the pin that holds the shifter forks in place and rotate them out of the way. I made sure to label which fork was located where and in which orientation.

    Shifting roll-
    <img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-IbsFE-EUA5k/Uli_EcFAxcI/AAAAAAAAC1U/QsSxN9rHR8g/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252076.jpg" height="600" width="800" /></a>
    The strange profile around the bottom of the shifting roll is what controls the amount of pressure needed to slip the bike into gear. It essentially keeps the transmission in the gear that is selected until your action on the shift rod pushes the shift lever over these humps. So, at this point, I started to take a closer inspection of the Shifting Roll and shift selection linkage for wear. Looking at the lever that rides along the bottom of the Shifter Roll (this keeps the transmission from slipping into other gears and rides along the asymmetrical profile along the bottom of Shifter Roll), it is obvious that I will need to order another one of these.
    <img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/--fxnLAd2lAE/Uli_FULbGtI/AAAAAAAAC1Y/yinCDuS5RP0/s800/BMW%2520motor%2520rebuild%2520-%252075.jpg" height="600" width="800" /></a>

    As X-challenge owners experience, finding neutral can be a real bitch. I'm hoping that by getting a new lever I can lessen the trail of tears in my search for neutral.
    #40