Bolt removal.

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by Sabre170, Sep 28, 2013.

  1. Sabre170

    Sabre170 Been here awhile

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    Hey all,

    So, on the right side of the engine, the airbox is held on with an 8mm nut that threads onto an 8mm stud. This stud goes forward into the eng block area. I want to remove the stud, AND salvage the 8mm (1.25pitch) threads inside.

    (Airbox eliminator kit.....right now, left side has hex bolt. The right side has this stud/nut combo......looking to use hex heads on both sides).

    I'm stumped as it seems very stuck in there.

    ?????
    #1
  2. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    This would be your '78 R100/7?
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  3. ME 109

    ME 109 Long timer

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    Use a second nut locked up tightly against the first nut, and undo with the first (inner) nut. Some penetrating oil or some heat or both may be required.
    I thought two bolts were standard?
    #3
  4. Sabre170

    Sabre170 Been here awhile

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    Yes, my 78 100/7.....sorry for leaving that out.

    Maybe two bolts are standard.....if that is the case, PO decided to change that setup. I'll give the 2nut approach a try.
    #4
  5. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    No, I think a stud is standard on the right.
    #5
  6. JonnyCash

    JonnyCash turd polisher

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    ^Yes, it is, the nut on the stud holds the air box on. I don't think you could get a bolt in there.
    #6
  7. Sabre170

    Sabre170 Been here awhile

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    No luck with the double bold....in fact made things a bit worse.....started to strip some threads with all the torque.

    I didn't try any heat though. Any suggestions where to heat it up at? Heat the engine block in the vicinity of the bolt???
    #7
  8. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    Why do you want to remove this part?

    Give up. Airheads do not want to change. :deal
    #8
  9. Sabre170

    Sabre170 Been here awhile

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    On my airbox eliminator plate, it currently has the hex head in the left with a nut in the right. Call me OCD, but I want to have hex head bolts on both sides.
    #9
  10. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    If there's threads sticking out and no bolt head on the other side, it's a stud.

    Look for a bulge in the gearbox on the outside. it's is screwed into that. Apply heat there..
    #10
  11. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    but one will be screwed into the case and the other goes through to a nut. people are going to notice. Even worse, you're going to know. You wake up in the middle of the night staring into the darkness. All you'll see is that the two sides are not the same. you'll start to sweat. it becomes more difficult to breath...



    Anybdy ever mention that one cylinder is farther forward than the other? Or to put it another way, one is farther back. it doesn't have to be like that. Are the cylinders on a radial engine offset in a big spiral? No, they all lie in a plane. This is a two cylinder radial engine. It's not you with the problem. The designers of this thing were just perverse. Like with the through bolt and the stud.


    And they saw you coming.:D
    #11
  12. Andy-Gadget

    Andy-Gadget Any bike can go anywere

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    My standard procedure for steel "anything" screwed into alloy "anything", is to give it a good, square, smack with a big hammer, before trying to turn anything.

    The reason for this seemingly abusive approach is break the corrosion that develops between the steel and the alloy that stops the screw coming out if left alone.
    I have had to do this repeatedly in the last week working on a new to me XR650R motard, all the into alloy screws needed this treatment, with no failures. Button head socket headed cap screws, much loved by Mr Honda, received this smack via an allen key socket.

    I learnt this the hard way, while servicing Hydrovan air compressors, with big steel screw plugs with shallow hex heads that would round off if the above treatment wasn't religiously applied.

    So give the end of the stud a good wup with a precision adjusting tool, and try again.

    The con rods of a radial aero engine are all in line, as there is one master rod, that has all the other rods attached to it.
    The Boxer engine is a two throw engine or it wouldn't be a boxer, which means both pistons go out together, no similarity to a radial in any way that matters.

    #12
  13. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    Mention it all the time. Notice it every time in start my bike. I say to myself, "Look at that. The right cylinder is behind the left." :freaky

    I think the radial airplane engines are different than our bikes in many ways. For one thing they always have an odd number of cylinders. (I forget the reason or explanation of this but have for years been trying to find it. If a single row or bank of cylinders is used the number of cylinders is odd. The P-51 had an even number of cylinders because it had two rows and they could be run independently, I've heard)

    We have a lot of pilots and plane freaks here maybe somebody will explain.
    #13
  14. bmwrench

    bmwrench Long timer

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    "So give the end of the stud a good wup with a precision adjusting tool..."

    This is correctly described as a "Bashometer".

    That upper stud was not meant to be removed. It is nearly an interference fit thanks to being tapped undersized. You will need to heat the engine case near the stud, and it would help to have an assistant to lean on a wrench or vice grips while you heat it.
    #14
  15. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    [​IMG]
    #15
  16. bmwhacker

    bmwhacker Still on 3 wheels

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    I remember seeing films of other types of radial engines that have a stationary crankshaft, and the cylinders actually spin with the prop.:eek1
    #16
  17. Andy-Gadget

    Andy-Gadget Any bike can go anywere

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    WW1, rotary as apposed to radial, but the crank and rod system was most probably the same, for the same reason.
    #17
  18. jackd

    jackd Long timer

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    Now I'm going to go back 25 years when I still used to work on radials. The reason for the odd number of cylinders in each row was for the firing of each cylinder - the timing was #1 cylinder, then 3, 5, 7 , 9, 2, 4, 6, 8, and then back to #1. So they would fire every second cylinder to keep the power pulses coming smoothly as the crank did it's rotation.

    Er.. The P-51 didn't have a radial engine. Multiple row radials always had uneven numbers in their cylinder banks as well - 7, 9, etc. The Pratt & Whitney R4360 has 4 rows of 7 cylinders - total of 28. The Wright R3350 had 2 rows of 9 cylinders - total of 18. I hope I make sense here.
    #18
  19. jackd

    jackd Long timer

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    How the hell did removing a bolt turn into a discussion about radial engines?
    #19
  20. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    He knows how to get the stud out now. Should we be talking about girls? :snore

    For 4 grand you can get your own fully operational radial engine---table top size. Runs on glow fuel...

    powered wheels anybody?
    #20