Breaking the bead in the middle of nowhere

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by kiteguy, Dec 19, 2004.

  1. Katoum

    Katoum Adventurer

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    I finished one wheel with 6" of bead removed, and then reinstalled the tire.
    I was able to push bead down by hand but I could still not force it over the lip. With a sidestand as mentioned earlier is was much easier to get the bead broken, also the tire beads at a much lower pressure as well.

    On my rim after getting the hang of the router, I decided to remove the entire bead. This took approx 4 hours of work, but then I was pretty picky about the finish.


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    Here are some pictures of the rim in various stages, you can see from the different angles the bead and what was removed.

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    On the first wheel I did you can see the surface was a little rougher as we were using a standard steel (non carbide ) bit which was very dull, but it still got the job done just needed more finish sanding.



    This wheel has the entire bead removed with the carbide bit, and it was very easy to do, just had to keep you whits about you as routers sometime can have a mind of there own.
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    A few pictures showing the wheels we used to finish the inner edge.




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    And finally a few pictures of the router and the mod we did to the base.
    Hope this is has been of some help for the more adventurous :freaky

    Here is a link to pictures in a larger resolution for more detail.
    http://katoum.smugmug.com/gallery/385459
    #61
  2. Tim McKittrick

    Tim McKittrick Long timer

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    If you screw a few horisontal strips of wood to your router base such that they ride on the outside or the rim, you can center the router and make it easier to get an even cut. Then you just have to flip the wheel over to do the other side.
    If you have a helper, re-mount the wheel in the swingarm, hold the router steady, and rotate the wheel to control the feed. With the rail guides, you should be able to gradualy lower the bit and skim off a little at a time in order to get a better and smoother cut.
    #62
  3. Katoum

    Katoum Adventurer

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    Good points Tim, a guide to rub the inside edge of the wheel would definetly have been good, expecially with the dull bit, :thumb If I was going to be doing more I definetly would incorporate your idea.

    #63
  4. RAGrote

    RAGrote Long timer

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    #64
  5. Jay2

    Jay2 Pro Flattrack & SuperMoto

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    Buy it here www.motorcyclemoments.com or have you dealer order a dozen so everyone can get one. The RaceTools Bead Popper...For more info go to the web-site...Should end your problems for popping the bead on any of your tires...except ATVs of course!!! j2
    #65
  6. HellsAlien

    HellsAlien a has-been that never-was

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    Yes, that's what I use. A palm-sized compressor. Cost ten bucks at AutoZone. Remove the case, cut off the fan, put on whatever accessory connector you have on your bike. I cut off the pressure gauge too. The whole thing wraps up in a rag and fits easily into the stashbox under the seat with the rest of the tools & tire fix'in stuff. It's so light you can just let the airhose dangle from the stem fitting. It will do the 950 tire with some lube on the bead like 409 cleaner, chap stick or whatever.
    #66
  7. Singletrack

    Singletrack Adventurer

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    This thread has been quite usefull to share my frustration. I gave myself two hours to change both original Scorpions to new TKC-80's. "Should be plenty of time". Not. I would have been sucked dry by mosquitos if a rear flat had happened on the trail

    Front tire was no problem, but getting the damn axle out was a bear. I used the extention handle for the axle nut wrench from the tool kit and a hammer to coax it out. But I buggered the threads on the tapered end where the axle bolt screws in :baldy

    The rear axle took a 3 pound sledge with a block of wood to get it to move. Why does KTM spec painted axles??? The paint had worn at the bearing races and gripped the bearings.

    There was no way I could get the bead broken on the rear tire. I put the side-stand on the bead, wouldn't break. I used 2 F-clamps, 2 wood working clamps and a 5" bench vise. Still wouldn't break. Finally took it to a dealer. (Done at no charge too! Thanks guys at V&S Custom Cycles in Toronto)

    I'll grind down the inner bead stops later. Sounds like a good idea. But I do like the idea of some blow-out protection on a bike as big and fast as the 950.

    My question, how do people get the axles out on the trail? I'd like to weld on some grab handles like enduro bikes often have. Has anyone tried that?
    #67
  8. MookieBlaylock

    MookieBlaylock Long timer

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  9. RedFlash

    RedFlash Go Cubs!

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    And how!

    Just finished the abbreviated (6") removal of the inner bead and polished it up. Since I was doing the partial bead, I decided to forgo the router method and used a dremel tool with a cabride cutting bit. It took about 45 minutes per bead, then about ten miutes a side to polish with a medium flapper on the air die-grinder. I wasn't in any big hurry as the KTM is on standby until the o-rings arrive for the leaking water pump inlet pipe :bluduh .

    Your write up was very clear, informative and the pic's helped a bunch. I am sure the end results will be an easier chore of breaking the bead next time.

    Thanks :thumb !
    #69
  10. k7

    k7 Ancien cyclist

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    I was gonna do mine but... couldn't get the tire off. :puke1



    :hide
    #70
  11. Gregster

    Gregster Been here awhile

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    Do you think you'll have to get the wheel balanced, now that some mass has been removed from part of it ?
    #71
  12. RedFlash

    RedFlash Go Cubs!

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    Since most of the mass removed is aluminum, the effect is minimal. I am guessing the displacement is on order of one or two grams, as oppoosed to the standard single compensating "weight" mass of over 7 grams. Maybe a slight reduction in the usual compensation (or gain depending on the tire/rim combo) to fix the "problem". The tire manufacture tolerance will have a greater impact on balancing.
    #72
  13. PvtIdaho

    PvtIdaho Deck Spotter

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    I just got cleaned up from patching the rear tube/tire after picking up a self-tapping screw on the way to the movie rental place.

    Kind of creepy that this is the first thread on Orange Crush…

    I used the side-stand-with-the–bike-on-the-center-stand method. It worked like a champ.

    The pressure held until I got home and removed the screw so I got to do the repair in the garage.

    Liberal use of soap and water for lube made reseating the bead a little easier than other posts I’ve read here. I used a bicycle floor pump and the last part of the bead popped back at about 30 psi.

    I tried to reseat the bead using the same method I use on bicycle tires – bouncing the tire /wheel combo with about 15-20 psi in the tube. It seemed to be helping - right up to the point that the rear sprocket and 6 dampers scattered all over the garage floor. Oops…

    Special thanks to Turkish for the side stand idea. I’d probably still be in the garage and preparing to go postal if he hadn't posted that technique.
    #73
  14. adventure950

    adventure950 Anglo-Saxon

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    Ausie tyrepliers, For you lads who reckon these dont work think again, they are very light, I carry them fastened under the seat pan, to remove the tyre off the bead with them just lay a small tyre iron (you need one about 6 inches with a recessed dimple in the handle area) along the edge of the wheel rim then tighten away this gives the bead breaker a good edge to get hold onto then repeat this in three different places and the bead pops out in no time I can now do it in about ten mins. Popping the bead back on I use Bulk Co2 cartridges meant for large mountain bike tyres then ride the bike about 100yds slowly and the bead goes back in place - also use tyre soap( slippiest stuff in the world). (ps the cartridges contain Liqued petroleum Gas as well and are not reccommended for motor vehicles) Once the beads on I let the co2/gas mix out and re inflate with a hand pump _ dont want exploding tyres!. Tried and tested this method several times and I am getting quite good at it. I also have a small electric pump which I have carried on a trip in russia but never needed it once. ( It took up alittle more space than I had available)
    #74
  15. adventure950

    adventure950 Anglo-Saxon

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    Just found this little pump and seen a demo in a local cycle shop. not really designed for motorbikes but may be the answer to the re seating problems and getting enough pressure into the tyre before having a heart attack! I will buy one next week (£17.00) then pop my tyre off and try and pop it back on with this liitle pump. let you know how it works soon enough. look at them on the following web pages : www.cyclaire.com
    #75
  16. cjracer

    cjracer AWD please!!

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    Looks like a nice unit, anywhere to get this in the states?
    #76
  17. O.C.F.RIDER

    O.C.F.RIDER Loose nut behind h/bars

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    The only reason there would be to balance the wheel would be if you were going to ride the bike WITHOUT a tire on it:yikes
    SEE YA:lol2
    CHRIS
    #77
  18. adventure950

    adventure950 Anglo-Saxon

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    Thought I would report back re the cycleair pump I mentioned anyway I bought one, Removed rear wheel (3 MINS), deflated tyre and using ausie tyre pliers with the little adapters I have knocked up popped the bead all round (5mins).
    tyresoaped the tyre then tried this little pump and found it just did not have the volume of air to fill the tyre after 10 mins non stop pumping the tyre was going no where. so out came one bulkair co 2/lpg mountain cycle cartridge and pop the tyre was back on for 90% of the bead I topped this up with (5min)on my ordinary hand pump and then pop the bead was all on. Wheel back on torques up and ready to ride (4mins) usually just ride the bike to pop this bit of bead back on, But being the nice bloke I am and In keeping with this timed and very testing task decided to do it all by hand.
    So my results doing the whole removal, breaking the bead , reseating the bead and refitting the tyre took under 20 mins with a bit of time for mucking about. the cycleair pump was no good for this job so I will stick to my bulkair co2/lpg mix cartridge/ hand pump or alternatley the 12v electric pump to do the whole job. Hope this helps. (PS the bulk cartridges are not designed for high speeds at all ( max 40kph) they are designed for mountain bikes and so its advisable to empty the tyre at the first opportunity and re fill with air.
    #78
  19. cjracer

    cjracer AWD please!!

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    From the pics of the pump it looks like a hand pump, not electric? Is that the one that you bought or is it different? It says it's good for 120psi, but I could believe that it would not create enough volume per pump=arm falls off. Thanks for the test and reply.
    #79
  20. Goss

    Goss LC8 Adventurer

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    CJracer, thanks for setting me straight. I retract and plead the 5th. :lol3
    #80